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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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Special Screenings


Fri, Sep 14, 2007
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 15, 2007
at 7:15 PM

Sun, Sep 16, 2007
at 7 PM

JACK SMITH AND THE DESTRUCTION OF ATLANTIS
DIRECTOR: MARY JORDAN
US
A defining influence on several generations of underground artists, performers and filmmakers, Jack Smith (1932-1989) was an intensely charismatic, sometimes exasperating fixture of the New York art scene. The patron saint of the queer avant-garde and the whole genre of performance art, his Atlantis was both the idea of a fantastical utopia and the reality of the Lower East Side apartment in which he prophetically staged baroque, improvisational multi-hour one-man theatrical productions, often with a cast of stuffed animals and dolls. An avant-garde photographer, filmmaker, actor and all-around "flaming creature," Smith has been credited as a major influence by Fellini, Godard, Jarmusch and Andy Warhol, who considered him"the only person I would ever try to copy." "I genuflect before Jack Smith, the only true 'underground filmmaker.'"—John Waters. "Irresistible." – Richard Corliss, TIME. ( 95 min )


Sponsored by Just Out Newspaper
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Wed, Sep 19, 2007
at 7 PM

HOW DIGGING A WELL CAN UNDERMINE CENSORSHIP:
NARRATIVE STRATEGIES IN IRANIAN & ARAB FILMS
VISITING LECTURE
We welcome German film writer and critic Heile Kuehn, the juror for this year's 34th Northwest Film & Video Festival, for a lecture on contemporary middle-east cinema and culture. "After 9/11 we tend to demonize anything Islamic or Arabian. We rather look for the projections of our fear, our anger, our revolt against terrorism, the oppression of freedom and violence against women. To understand what is going on in Iran and Afghanistan, in Algeria or Morocco, we could profit from their projections: even the notorious Iranian censorship could not prevent filmmakers from speaking, sometimes whispering the truth. In Palestinian movies we recognize the power of absurdity: "Waiting for Godot" could have been written for a society that spends quite a lot of time queuing in front of checkpoints. Yet out of this blackness we witness filmmakers fighting back fundamentalism by claiming Islam for themselves: not the Islam of terror, but of civil rights, spiritual wisdom as in Sufi tradition or beauty as immortalized in "1001 Nights."—HK. ( 80 min )


FREE ADMISSION Co-sponsored with Pacific Northwest College of Art.
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Thu, Sep 20, 2007
at 7 PM

ANTONIA
NW Film center & THE PORTLAND LATIN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL PRESENT:
DIRECTOR: TATA AMARAL
BRAZIL
Amaral's vibrant film follows the ups and downs of four spunky Afro-Brazilian female rappers living on the outskirts of São Paolo. Preta, Barbara, Mayah and Lena provide back-up vocals for an up and coming male rap group and are anxious to find their own spotlight. At a concert in the girls' neighborhood of Brasilandia they finally get the chance to sing and their performance wows the local crowd. Marcelo, a suave promoter, offers to help guide them on the road to success and they warily accept. But circumstance and passion conspire against finding an easy road to stardom as each must struggle with obligations to husbands, family, and friends as well as music business treachery. Set against the back drop of Brasilandia's poverty and violence, yet strong sense of community, this sassy, streetwise and music-filled drama offers the promise of a way out through art, music and the poetry of everyday experience. ( 90 min )


Tonight's film is co-presented with the Portland Latin American Film Festival, September 20-23. www.pdxlaff.org. Special admission: $9 general; $8 Silver Screen Members, Silver Screen Club Friends, Portland Art Museum members; $7 students, seniors, children.
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Fri, Sep 21, 2007
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 22, 2007
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 23, 2007
at 4 PM

ALICE NEEL
DIRECTOR: ANDREW NEEL
US
Portrait painter Alice Neel (1900-1984) was a self-described collector of souls. Through six decades of the 20th century, she recorded her sitters on canvas, among them Andy Warhol, Bella Abzug, Allen Ginsberg and Annie Sprinkle. Neel always sought the "authentic," moving from Greenwhich Village to Spanish Harlem just as the Village was gaining reputation in the art scene. She sacrificed almost everything for her art, delving so far into the psyches of her sitters that she would almost lose herself. Yet Neel was also a dedicated mother who raised two sons in the bohemian world she inhabited. Filmmaker Andrew Neel, Alice Neel's grandson, puts together the pieces of the painter's life using personal archival video and intimate one-on-one interviews with Neel's surviving family members. The documentary explores the artist's tumultuous biography and the legacy of Neel's determination to paint her era. "A stunning portrait of perhaps the most gifted, cutting edge, raunchy and defiant female artist of modern times"—TIME OUT. ( 81 min )


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Thu, Sep 27, 2007
at 7 PM

OPEN SCREENING
DIRECTOR: YOU
NORTHWEST
Invite your friends to a public showing of your latest project as we throw open the doors of the Whitsell Auditorium for our bi-monthly open screening. If you have something you're proud of, sign up by October 1st with Thomas Phillipson at thomas@nwfilm.org. First come first served as time allows. ( 90 min )


FREE ADMISSION
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Tue, Oct 9, 2007
at 7 PM

EXTREME PRIVATE EROS: LOVE SONG
NW Film center & 40 FRAMES PRESENT:
DIRECTOR: HARA KAZUO
JAPAN
"Hara's second film is without a doubt his most outrageous, personal and masochistic work. Shot over several years—mostly handheld black-and-white and often with out-of-synch sound--—this raw confessional has Hara following his ex-wife, 26-year-old radical feminist Miyuki Takeda, capturing their post-break-up relationship and her new life without him. This was a brutal dose of reality for Japanese viewers, as it matter-of-factly tackles heartache, sex, insecurities, gender politics, and even on-camera childbirth. Kazuo's film offers an extraordinarily intimate portrayal of the ideology, philosophy, and lives of radicals in the Vietnam era and the postwar relationship between Japan, Okinawa, and the United States."—Anthology Film Archives. ( 92 min )


Co-sponsored by Portland State University English Department, Film Studies Minor.
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Fri, Oct 19, 2007
at 9 PM

Sat, Oct 20, 2007
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Oct 21, 2007
at 2 PM

BLACK WHITE + GRAY: A PORTRAIT OF SAM WAGSTAFF AND ROBERT MAPLETHORPE
DIRECTOR: JAMES CRUMP
US
Exploring the relationships between legendary curator Sam Wagstaff, famed photographer Robert Mapplethorpe and punk rock's "poet laureate" Patti Smith, BLACK WHITE + GRAY reveals the fascinating story of the influential figures who helped form the epicenter of New York's grand collision of art, fashion, music and club life in the '70s and '80s. Featuring interviews with Patti Smith, Dominick Dunne, Dick Cavett, Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Eugenia Parry, Philippe Garner, Ingrid Sischy. "A solid account of how the curator and patron Sam Wagstaff defined photography as an art form for the 20th century, chronicling the passion with which he assembled the photo collection he eventually sold to the Getty Museum for $5 million in 1985."—PREMIERE. ( 70 min )


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Fri, Oct 19, 2007
at 9 PM

Sat, Oct 20, 2007
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Oct 21, 2007
at 2 PM

A WALK INTO THE SEA: DANNY WILLIAMS AND THE WARHOL FACTORY
DIRECTOR: ESTHER ROBINSON
US
Robinson's engrossing, dream-like portrait is of her uncle Danny Williams, Warhol's onetime lover and collaborator and a filmmaker in his own right. Robinson's behind-the-scenes peek into the Factory era and the story of William's mysterious disappearance at age 27 offer both homage to his largely unrecognized talent and another chapter in the saga of the enigmatic Warhol legend and its many causalities. "It's always useful to be reminded that Warhol perversely got off on setting acolyte against acolyte and standing back to survey the emotional (and sometimes physical) damage (and, of course, profiting immensely) . . . Fascinating stuff." —David Edelstein, NEW YORK MAGAZINE. Best Documentary, Berlin Film Festival. ( 77 min )


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Tue, Oct 23, 2007
at 7 PM

ONE WAY BOOGIE WOOGIE 27 YEARS LATER
NW Film Center & 40 frames present:
DIRECTOR: JAMES BENNING
US
"In 1977, concerned about the decaying nature of his native Milwaukee, Benning shot ONE WAY BOOGIE WOOGIE, an hour-long film composed of 60 shots of industrial urban landscape: smokestacks, sidewalks, three Volkswagens, people few and far between, an animal here and there. In characteristic fashion, Benning's apparently simple, static shots are exercises in meticulous painterly composition, and their careful sequencing ensures that the director's playful humour is given full expression. For 27 YEARS LATER, Benning returned to Milwaukee to shoot 'the same film again'. The shot-by-shot re-staging uses very obviously different stock —the colours are brighter, there's a distinctly modern tone. Buildings are showing their age, or gone; people likewise. Seen together, these two films offer a cogent illustration of how America has changed in the intervening years, fraying in places, gentrified in others. Benning's method, and his affinity with his subjects is extraordinary—as if he completely absorbs the landscape, imbues it with geo-political and cultural relevance, and re-presents it to us in a unique mix of formal rigour and mischievous invention."—LONDON FILM FESTIVAL. ( 121 min )


James Benning will introduce the film. Co-sponsored by Portland State University English Department, Film Studies Minor.
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Thu, Oct 25, 2007
at 6:30 PM

TEEN SCREEN
NORTHWEST TRACKING:
DIRECTOR: NORTHWEST TEENS
US
Today's young filmmakers are using film and video to tell unique, inventive, and often humorous, narratives that reflect the particulars and peculiarities of the world as they see it. Join us tonight as we showcase seven shorts created by teens participating in a variety of Young Filmmakers Program activities, from the summertime Media Arts Academy for Teens, and annual Young People's Film & Video Festival, to artist residencies conducted at individual area high schools. The program includes: BLAME FIONA, a comedy of errors in which fate has the last word, created by youth participating in the Media Arts Academy for Teens bootcamp led this summer by Andy Blubaugh; MILLER THRILLER, a story of a funeral home that becomes a public school, produced by students at the Miller Education Center in Hillsboro; RED PLAYGROUND, a girls-eye-view of hunter and prey, directed by Vancouver School of Arts & Academics' Martha Early; AT THE DINER, vignettes from an establishment that serves more than pie and coffee, by Vancouver School of Arts & Academics' Eliot Murray; TILE "M" FOR MURDER, the story of Scrabble's undue influence on a nice married couple, produced by Ballard High School (WA) students Kyle Seago, Sami Kubo and Michael Gore; NICE TOUCH, in which friendship unfolds in a lonely apartment, by Ballard High School (WA) student Kevin Fitz-Wong; IN THE LAUNDRY ROOM, wherein an unlikely alliance of imagination and truth goes bump in the night, by Dalton Rose, of Snohomish High School (WA). ( 75 min )


Filmmakers in attendance to introduce their films. FREE ADMISSION.
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Fri, Oct 26, 2007
at 7 PM

THE PERFECT SHOW: AN EVENING WITH KARL KROGSTAD
NORTHWEST TRACKING:
DIRECTOR: KARL KROGSTAD
US
Tonight we welcome Seattle filmmaker/impresario Karl Krogstad for an evening of new works he thinks are "darned close to perfect!" Over Krogstad's 40 years of making shorts and features of every persuasion—animation, live action, documentary, found footage collage—his work has been in dozens of film festivals, the training ground for an amazing cross-section of the Seattle film community for whom he is a source of singular amusement and creativity. Among the works he is premiering are THE TRAVEL SHOW, an ode to the glories of France; THE SHRINE TO CIRCUSANITY, a document of an annual Krogstad happening in the eastern Washington desert; FELLINI'S LAST SCENE, his interpretation of a scene in a train car scripted by Fellini (a Krogstad hero) just before he died; THE MAKING OF FELLINI'S LAST SCENE, a making-of documentary by Alex Gonzalez about the making of the aforementioned film; and BEST OF THE AMERICAN AVANT GARDE, favorite clips from the cable television show he produces in Seattle that features work by Northwest filmmakers. "All these films are strange. Like good poems, all served on ice."—KK. ( 90 min )


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Fri, Nov 2, 2007
at 7 PM

Sat, Nov 3, 2007
at 7 PM

Sun, Nov 4, 2007
at 5 PM

COOL SCHOOL
DIRECTOR: MORGAN NEVILLE
US
New York has long been regarded as the heart of the American art movement, but by the 1950s, as the post-war rise of Abstract Expressionism became the new wave of painting in the United States, a small but determined band of painters, curators and collectors on the West Coast were determined to make themselves known. Neville's COOL SCHOOL examines the rise of the Los Angeles art scene and how it brought a new and vigorously American slant to contemporary painting whose influence endures. Neville profiles, among many others, Walter Hopps and Irving Blum, owners of the Ferus Gallery, which championed the work of sculptors Ed Kienholz and Larry Bell and painters Ed Ruscha, John Altoon and Billy Al Bengston; architect Frank Gehry, whose ideas dovetailed with those of the new L.A. artists; and Dennis Hopper and Dean Stockwell, actors and Hollywood bohemians whose love of the new L.A. art (and willingness to buy pieces) provided crucial support for a struggling movement. "What THE COOL SCHOOL does so well, through its color accents and black-and-white photography, through the kinetic music that propels Jeff Bridges' narration and the unorthodox attitude that reflects the artists themselves, is impart a sense of discovery. As Neville so obviously feels, making a staid, overly respectful movie about a gang of revolutionaries would miss the point."—VARIETY. ( 89 min )


Morgan Neville will introduce the film Friday evening.
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