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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Sat, Jan 9, 2016
at 4:30 PM

Northwest Film Center Student Screening

 

Everyone is invited to watch the many short films created by students in the classes of Fall Term 2015. Whether the first attempt of a beginner or something more ambitious from an advanced student, it’s an uncurated, all-comers program for anyone who has decided they’re ready to show their work on the big screen. Join in congratulating them on this important step in their journey toward self-expression through film. Free Admission.  Reception to follow. (120 mins.)

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Wed, Jan 20, 2016
at 7 PM

SON OF SAUL
DIRECTOR: LASZLO NEMES
HUNGARY, 2015

 

Saul is a member of the Sonderkommando, a group of Jewish prisoners forced to assist the Nazis in the disposal of gas chamber victims. While working in one of the crematoriums, Saul discovers the body of a boy he believes to be his son. As other members of the Sonderkommando plan a rebellion, Saul decides to carry out an impossible task: save the child’s body from the flames, find a rabbi to recite the mourner’s Kaddish, and offer the boy a proper burial. “A film that looks into the abyss, this shattering portrait of the horror of Auschwitz. . . [is] a bombshell debut . . .an utterly harrowing, ultra-immersive experience, and not for the fainthearted.”—New York Film Festival. (107 mins.) 

 

This year’s Hungarian submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award. Screening open to Silver Screen members and Portland Jewish Film Festival sponsors only. 


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Sat, Mar 5, 2016
at 6:30 PM

Sat, Mar 12, 2016
at 6:30 PM

OUT 1: NOLI ME TANGERE
Episodes 1 & 2
DIRECTOR: JACQUES RIVETTE
FRANCE, 1971

 

Produced on a tight schedule between Rivette’s acclaimed L’AMOUR FOU and CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING, OUT 1 was, until now, one of the most chronically unseeable films of the latter half of the 20th century. The film follows the activities of two theater troupes rehearsing productions of Aeschylus and two outsiders peripherally circling the proceedings. The outliers are a charlatan (Jean- Pierre Léaud) and a scam artist (Juliet Berto) who claim to have correspondence proving the existence of a secret society mysteriously called The Thirteen, with which some members of the troupes may be involved. Rivette’s magnum opus provides a critical lens through which to view post-1968 French society and its discontents. “In OUT 1, Rivette used a formidable tool—a made-for-television 16 mm camera he pointed at a bunch of actors/friends he respected, and at a city he loved. A camera that would allow him to shoot in long takes (some lasting up to 13 minutes) and to follow the improvisational rhythm of the action. He never faced head-on the trauma of May ‘68 (Noli me tangere)—but he composed one of the most accurate expressions of his time. One of the most real.”—Bérénice Reynaud. “The cinephile’s holy grail.”—Dennis Lim, The New York Times. (ep. 1 & 2, 199) 

All screenings will feature a 15-minute intermission between episodes. Digitally restored by Technicolor, for Sunshine with the support of the Centre national du cinéma et de l’image animée. Color grading supervised by the film’s cinematographer, Pierre-William Glenn, AFC. 


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Mon, Mar 7, 2016
at 6:30 PM

Mon, Mar 14, 2016
at 6:30 PM

OUT 1: NOLI ME TANGERE
EPISODES 3 & 4
DIRECTOR: JACQUES RIVETTE
FRANCE, 1971

 

Produced on a tight schedule between Rivette’s acclaimed L’AMOUR FOU and CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING, OUT 1 was, until now, one of the most chronically unseeable films of the latter half of the 20th century. The film follows the activities of two theater troupes rehearsing productions of Aeschylus and two outsiders peripherally circling the proceedings. The outliers are a charlatan (Jean- Pierre Léaud) and a scam artist (Juliet Berto) who claim to have correspondence proving the existence of a secret society mysteriously called The Thirteen, with which some members of the troupes may be involved. Rivette’s magnum opus provides a critical lens through which to view post-1968 French society and its discontents. “In OUT 1, Rivette used a formidable tool—a made-for-television 16 mm camera he pointed at a bunch of actors/friends he respected, and at a city he loved. A camera that would allow him to shoot in long takes (some lasting up to 13 minutes) and to follow the improvisational rhythm of the action. He never faced head-on the trauma of May ‘68 (Noli me tangere)—but he composed one of the most accurate expressions of his time. One of the most real.”—Bérénice Reynaud. “The cinephile’s holy grail.”—Dennis Lim, The New York Times. (ep. 3 & 4, 215 mins.) 

 

All screenings will feature a 15-minute intermission between episodes. Digitally restored by Technicolor, for Sunshine with the support of the Centre national du cinéma et de l’image animée. Color grading supervised by the film’s cinematographer, Pierre-William Glenn, AFC. 


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Tue, Mar 8, 2016
at 6:30 PM

Wed, Mar 16, 2016
at 6:30 PM

OUT 1: NOLI ME TANGERE
EPISODES 5 & 6
DIRECTOR: JACQUES RIVETTE
FRANCE, 1971

 

Produced on a tight schedule between Rivette’s acclaimed L’AMOUR FOU and CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING, OUT 1 was, until now, one of the most chronically unseeable films of the latter half of the 20th century. The film follows the activities of two theater troupes rehearsing productions of Aeschylus and two outsiders peripherally circling the proceedings. The outliers are a charlatan (Jean- Pierre Léaud) and a scam artist (Juliet Berto) who claim to have correspondence proving the existence of a secret society mysteriously called The Thirteen, with which some members of the troupes may be involved. Rivette’s magnum opus provides a critical lens through which to view post-1968 French society and its discontents. “In OUT 1, Rivette used a formidable tool—a made-for-television 16 mm camera he pointed at a bunch of actors/friends he respected, and at a city he loved. A camera that would allow him to shoot in long takes (some lasting up to 13 minutes) and to follow the improvisational rhythm of the action. He never faced head-on the trauma of May ‘68 (Noli me tangere)—but he composed one of the most accurate expressions of his time. One of the most real.”—Bérénice Reynaud. “The cinephile’s holy grail.”—Dennis Lim, The New York Times. (ep. 5 & 6, 190 mins.) 

 

All screenings will feature a 15-minute intermission between episodes. Digitally restored by Technicolor, for Sunshine with the support of the Centre national du cinéma et de l’image animée. Color grading supervised by the film’s cinematographer, Pierre-William Glenn, AFC. 


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Wed, Mar 9, 2016
at 6:30 PM

Thu, Mar 17, 2016
at 6:30 PM

OUT 1: NOLI ME TANGERE
EPISODES 7 & 8
DIRECTOR: JACQUES RIVETTE
FRANCE, 1971

 

Produced on a tight schedule between Rivette’s acclaimed L’AMOUR FOU and CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING, OUT 1 was, until now, one of the most chronically unseeable films of the latter half of the 20th century. The film follows the activities of two theater troupes rehearsing productions of Aeschylus and two outsiders peripherally circling the proceedings. The outliers are a charlatan (Jean- Pierre Léaud) and a scam artist (Juliet Berto) who claim to have correspondence proving the existence of a secret society mysteriously called The Thirteen, with which some members of the troupes may be involved. Rivette’s magnum opus provides a critical lens through which to view post-1968 French society and its discontents. “In OUT 1, Rivette used a formidable tool—a made-for-television 16 mm camera he pointed at a bunch of actors/friends he respected, and at a city he loved. A camera that would allow him to shoot in long takes (some lasting up to 13 minutes) and to follow the improvisational rhythm of the action. He never faced head-on the trauma of May ‘68 (Noli me tangere)—but he composed one of the most accurate expressions of his time. One of the most real.”—Bérénice Reynaud. “The cinephile’s holy grail.”—Dennis Lim, The New York Times. (ep. 7 & 8, 171 mins.) 

 

All screenings will feature a 15-minute intermission between episodes. Digitally restored by Technicolor, for Sunshine with the support of the Centre national du cinéma et de l’image animée. Color grading supervised by the film’s cinematographer, Pierre-William Glenn, AFC. 


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