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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
2015 UCLA Festival of Preservation

 

The UCLA Film & Television Archive is, after the Library of Congress, the largest collection of media materials in the United States and ranks among the premier film preservation institutions in the world. The Archive’s annual preservation efforts—an ambitious, eclectic range of everything from lost silents to at-risk mid-century features, shorts, and documentaries—find new audiences in each year’s Festival of Preservation in Los Angeles and in the works selected for a smaller touring program. We are honored to present the 2015 UCLA Festival of Preservation program, a surprise-filled treasure trove sure to delight cinema lovers of many persuasions. “Forget Cannes, Sundance, even the Oscars: This is the cinematic event I look forward to most of all. That’s because no other movie festival comes close to it in the magnificent breadth of neglected but compelling American film material it puts on display. ”— Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times. Special thanks to Shannon Kelley, Head of Public Programs; Steven Hill, Circulation; Todd Weiner, Archivist; and Dr. Jan-Christopher Horak, Director, UCLA Film & Television Archive, for making these new 35mm preservation prints available. Program notes by Marty Rubin, Gene Siskel Film Center, Chicago. Additional notes are available in the Festival of Preservation Program catalogue (www.cinema.ucla.edu/programs/ucla-festival-preservation), which also includes additional information about the films and the Archive’s ambitious preservation efforts. 



Fri, Mar 18, 2016
at 7 PM

MEN IN WAR
DIRECTOR: ANTHONY MANN
US, 1957

 

MEN IN WAR represents a pinnacle of achievement in both the war movie genre and for director Anthony Mann. In the early days of the Korean War, a cut-off platoon tries to get back to its battalion, as Mann’s mythic brother-against-brother theme is played out between a war-weary lieutenant (Robert Ryan), an opportunistic loner (Aldo Ray), and a strange, mute father figure (Robert Keith). From the opening tracking shot across a smoking wasteland, the terrain is established as a palpable, living force that has to be fought through inch by inch. “Stunningly shot . . .War on the ground has rarely been done much better than this.”—David Denby, The New Yorker. (104 mins.) 

Preservation funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute. 


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Sat, Mar 19, 2016
at 4:30 PM

THE LONG VOYAGE HOME
DIRECTOR: JOHN FORD
USW, 1940

 

Between 1939 and his departure for the war in 1942, director John Ford was in the middle of a remarkable string of masterpieces. Gregg Toland, one the greatest-ever cinematographers, was revolutionizing film style with the deep-focus camera techniques that would culminate in his work on CITIZEN KANE. Together, Toland and Ford transformed this adaptation of four one-act plays by Eugene O’Neill (who considered it the best film version of his work) into a melancholy shadow-play about a group of sailors manning an explosives-carrying freighter. In the powerful final act, the sailors flounder amidst the onshore nightlife of a desolate harbor-side town. “An essential work . . . as personal and as deeply felt as any of the more recently canonized Ford masterpieces.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader. (105 mins.) 

Preservation funding provided by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and The Film Foundation. 


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Sun, Mar 20, 2016
at 4:30 PM

MY BEST GIRL
DIRECTOR: SAM TAYLOR
US, 1927

 

Mary Pickford was the most popular star of the silent era, whose celebrity surpassed even that of Chaplin and Valentino. MY BEST GIRL was her last silent film, and is widely regarded as one of her best. The story’s Cinderella romance between a spunky department-store stock girl (Pickford) and the owner’s son (Charles “Buddy” Rogers) is enriched by a motif of role-playing and disguise (he pretends not to be wealthy; she pretends not to be virtuous.) Cinematic highlights include a romantic stroll through the city, whose enchanted ordinariness evokes F.W. Murnau’s SUNRISE, made the same year. (72 mins.) 

Preservation funding provided by The Mary Pickford Foundation, The Packard Humanities Institute, and The Film Foundation. Preceded by two short films featuring early Mary Pickford performances: THE SON’S RETURN (US, 1909, 11 mins.), by D.W. Griffith, and A MANLY MAN (US 1911, 10 mins.), by Thomas H. Ince. 


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Sun, Mar 20, 2016
at 7 PM

SPRING NIGHT, SUMMER NIGHT
DIRECTOR: J.L. ANDERSON
US, 1967

 

Disregarded as an exploitation film (complete with tacked-on nude scenes) before dropping out of sight completely for forty years, this remarkable rediscovery has been hailed as an important classic in the New American Cinema tradition of SHADOWS, WANDA, THE EXILES, and KILLER OF SHEEP. Steeped with regional flavor, the story is set in a backwater of southeastern Ohio, where a young man impregnates a young woman who may or may not be his sister. Forcefully blending cinéma-vérité immersion with art-film sophistication, this unique film is a tour de force of sustained ambiguity, from the uncertain blood relationship between the two main characters to the idyllic/infernal nature of the world in which they live. “A compelling and beautiful drama that held its own with the very best of independent cinema.”—Ross Lipman, Sight and Sound. (82 mins.) Preservation funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute. 

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Tue, Mar 22, 2016
at 7 PM

BACHELOR'S AFFAIRS
DIRECTOR: ALFRED L. WERKER
US, 1932

 

With a nod to his offscreen playboy persona, debonair star Adolph Menjou plays an aging, wealthy lothario who is railroaded into marrying a full-bodied but empty-headed young blonde (Joan Marsh). Exhausted by her non-intellectual demands, the over-taxed husband conspires to find a younger man to divert the desires of his lusty new bride. Saucy, cynical, and fast-paced, BACHELOR’S AFFAIRS is a prime example of the “pre-Code” interregnum of mature Hollywood content. “There’s just one word to describe it: hilarious.”—Leonard Maltin, Indiewire. (64 mins.) Preservation funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute. 

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Fri, Mar 25, 2016
at 7 PM

FIRST LEGION
DIRECTOR: DOUGLAS SIRK
US, 1951

 

One of Sirk’s most unusual and explicitly philosophical films, this adaptation of Emmet Lavery’s 1934 play centers on a Jesuit seminary where an apparent miracle draws hordes of hysterical supplicants and sparks an internal debate over the validity of the alleged visitation. Working in a very different vein from the baroque flamboyance of his later color melodramas (WRITTEN ON THE WIND, ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS), Sirk’s deep-focus black-and-white style keeps skepticism and faith in a delicate balance. Anchored by Charles Boyer’s superb performance as a lawyer-priest whose integrity turns him into a reluctant detective, the excellent cast includes William Demarest in an unusually substantial and moving role as the go-to parish sorehead, and little-remembered character actor Lyle Bettger as an intriguing, agnostic antihero. (86 mins.) Preservation funding provided by The Louis B. Mayer Foundation and The Carl David Memorial Fund for Film Preservation. 

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Sat, Mar 26, 2016
at 4:30 PM

THE BIG BROADCAST
DIRECTOR: FRANK TUTTLE
US, 1932

 

In 1932 Paramount rounded up an impressive roster of radio personalities and threw them into this lightly plotted story about a radio station managed by George Burns (with partner Gracie as his logic-bending stenographer), bankrolled by an eccentric Texan (Stuart Erwin), and headlined by chronically tardy crooner “Bing Hornsby” (Bing Crosby, in his first starring role). The guest stars include the classy African American quartet The Mills Brothers harmonizing to “Tiger Rag,” patriotic powerhouse Kate Smith warbling “When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain,” and Harlem hipsters Cab Calloway and His Orchestra belting out a raucous rendition of “Kickin’ the Gong Around,” complete with simulated coke-snorting. “Playful, exuberant, and zany to the max.”— Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times. (80 mins.) Preservation funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute and Universal Pictures. With ME AND THE BOYS (UK, 1929, 7 mins.) by Victor Saville, which features a 20-year-old clarinet player named Benny Goodman. 

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Sat, Mar 26, 2016
at 7 PM

WHITE ZOMBIE
DIRECTOR: VICTOR HALPERIN
US, 1932

 I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE, NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, and countless other films trace their lineage back to WHITE ZOMBIE, widely regarded as the first zombie movie. The film is dominated by Bela Lugosi’s compelling performance as a Haitian voodoo master who uses a combination of magic potions and mind control to turn natives into docile slave workers for his sugar mill...and to impose his will upon a comely visitor (Madge Bellamy). A low-budget independent production, WHITE ZOMBIE cannily transcends its financial restraints with sets recycled from DRACULA and FRANKENSTEIN as well as a robust soundtrack of chanting natives, screeching buzzards, and, above all, the creaking, groaning machinery of the sugar mill. (68 mins.)


Preservation funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute. 

DOUBLE FEATURE WITH 

THE CRIME OF DOCTOR CRESPI 

US 1935 

DIRECTOR: JOHN H. AUER 

Loosely based on Poe’s “The Premature Burial,” the low-budget chiller THE CRIME OF DR. CRESPI features Erich von Stroheim as a brilliant surgeon who nurses a secret grudge against the colleague who stole away the woman he loved. A critical illness lands the rival on Stroheim’s operating table, setting the stage for a hideous revenge. Stroheim’s committed performance is the film’s main attraction, with a striking use of extreme close-ups to convey his startling mood swings from soft-spoken civility to snarling contempt. (63 mins.) 

Preservation funding provided by the Packard Humanities Institute. 


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Sun, Mar 27, 2016
at 4:30 PM

HER SISTER'S SECRET
DIRECTOR: EDGAR G. ULMER
US, 1946

 

B-picture auteur Ulmer took advantage of one of his biggest budgets to craft this intelligently scripted, solidly acted, amazingly subtle wartime drama--while still retaining his characteristically subversive attitude toward conventional morality. The story centers on a young New Orleans woman named Toni (Nancy Coleman), who is impregnated by a soldier on leave and reluctantly gives up the baby to her childless and wealthier older sister (Margaret Lindsay). Things become complicated when Toni begins to reconsider her decision. Struck from the original camera negative, this print represents a rare opportunity to see a “Poverty Row” production in its pristine state. “In this feverishly romantic, visually resplendent war-at-home melodrama . . .Ulmer cuts loose with a wild creativity that yoked his theatrical imagination to a keen view of the traumatic times.”—Richard Brody, The New Yorker. (86 mins.) 

Preservation funding provided by The Film Foundation and the Franco-American Cultural Fund. 


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