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VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
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Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
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Volume 3
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Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
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Volume 4
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Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
WIM WENDERS PORTRAITS ALONG THE ROAD

Beginning with his key role within the coterie of German filmmakers who took flight in the 1970s, Wim Wenders has since become one of world cinema’s greatest directors— and possibly its most poetic. Following an extensive restoration project of Wenders’ best-known works and most sought-after rarities, the Film Center is pleased to present this 14-program retrospective. Wim Wenders: Portraits Along the Road features critically-acclaimed classics such as PARIS, TEXAS (1984) and THE AMERICAN FRIEND (1977), while offering several long-unavailable films including Wenders’ feature debut, THE GOALIE’S ANXIETY AT THE PENALTY KICK (1974), and the complete five-hour director’s cut of the legendary UNTIL THE END OF THE WORLD (1991). The series highlights the important ways in which Wenders’ career has been shaped by his long-standing collaborations—with the producer Peter Przygodda, the cinematographer Robby Müller, the novelist and screenwriter Peter Handke, and the actors Rüdiger Vogler and Bruno Ganz. Much like the rock ‘n’ roll bands Wenders so adored through his youth and adulthood, these recurring collaborators form something of a backing band to Wenders’ frontman. His films—best seen on the big screen in the company of family, friends, lovers, and strangers—offer a glimpse of hope in a time of strife, and are profoundly resonant in a time where cinematic poetry has come to inhabit an increasingly marginal role in our collective lives. 

Synopses adapted from Janus Films’ “Portraits Along the Road” tour website: janusfilms.com/wenders/. For notes on the restoration project, please visit wimwendersstiftung. de/en/digitization/. 

 

Special thanks to the Wim Wenders Stiftung and Janus Films for restoring these key works and coordinating the touring program. 



Fri, Mar 4, 2016
at 7 PM

THE GOALIE'S ANXIETY AT THE PENALTY KICK
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY/AUSTRIA, 1972

 

Goalkeeper Josef Bloch (Arthur Brauss) is sent off after committing a foul during an away game; a seemingly simple act that causes him to completely lose his bearings. He wanders aimlessly through an unfamiliar town, spends the night with the box-office attendant of a movie theater (Erika Pluhar), and strangles her the next morning. But instead of turning himself in or fleeing, Bloch then goes to the country place of his ex-girlfriend (Kai Fischer) and passively waits there for the police to come and arrest him. As Wenders himself has stated, the visual idiom of Alfred Hitchcock’s films provided the model for this, his debut film. Adhering minutely to the thoroughly “cinematic” source (a novel by Peter Handke) and working with cameraman Robby Müller and editor Peter Przygodda—both of whom had already worked with him on his thesis film at the HFF (University of Television and Film Munich)—Wenders’ first cinematic collaboration would weld his team together for years to come. (100 mins.) 

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Sat, Mar 5, 2016
at 3:30 PM

WRONG MOVE
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY, 1975

 

Glückstadt in northern Germany, a palace along the Rhine, a housing project on the outskirts of Frankfurt, and finally the Zugspitze—these are the stations of the journey that young Wilhelm Meister (Rüdiger Vogler) hopes will save him from the gloomy irritability and despondency that plague him in his hometown. It is in these alien environs that he hopes to finally satisfy his most uncontrollable urge: to write. Imagining that the journey will broaden his horizons and develop his voice as an author, this unusual path actually leads Wilhelm through an unbroken series of failures. Each successive disaster is the result of his own faults as well as the shortcomings of the people he meets along the way: Laertes (Hans Christian Blech), the street singer struggling with his Nazi past, the mute girl Mignon (Nastassja Kinski in her first role), the poet (Peter Kern), and the actress Therese (Hanna Schygulla). (103 mins.) 

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Sun, Mar 6, 2016
at 7 PM

ALICE IN THE CITIES
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY, 1974

 

ALICE IN THE CITIES is technically Wenders’ fourth film, but he often refers to it as his first, because it was during the making of this film that he discovered the “road movie,” the genre that would eventually become his signature. It was also his first film to be shot (partially) in the U.S. and the first to feature his alter ego, Philip Winter (Rüdiger Vogler). Winter, a German journalist, wants to write a story about America but is unable to produce anything apart from a series of Polaroids. The day before Winter is set to return home, a woman convinces him to take her daughter Alice (Yella Rottländer) with him. Saying that she has urgent business to take care of, the woman agrees to meet them in Amsterdam to reclaim her daughter. When the mother fails to appear as planned, Winter and Alice set out to try to find Alice’s grandmother in the Ruhr region of Germany. During their search together, their initial mutual dislike gradually transforms into a heartfelt affection. (112 mins.) 

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Thu, Mar 10, 2016
at 7 PM

KINGS OF THE ROAD
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY, 1976

 

Wenders began shooting KINGS OF THE ROAD in an era of mass cinematic extinction, relying not on a script but on a pre-discovered route which took him through the little towns along the Berlin Wall that still contained movie theaters. KINGS OF THE ROAD is about a friendship between two men: Bruno, a.k.a. King of the Road (Rüdiger Vogler), who repairs film projectors and travels along the inner German border in his truck, and the psychologist Robert, a.k.a. Kamikaze (Hanns Zischler), who is fleeing from his own past. After driving his old Volkswagen straight into the Elbe River in a half-hearted suicide attempt, Robert is fished out of the river by Bruno. Thus begins a shared journey through a German no-man’s-land, a journey that leads them from the Lüneburg Heath to the Bavarian Forest. The men’s old moving van, outfitted with film projectors in the back, becomes a metaphor for the history of film—it is no coincidence that the film is dedicated to legendary German director Fritz Lang. (175 mins.) 

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Fri, Mar 11, 2016
at 8 PM

THE STATE OF THINGS
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY/US/PORTUGAL/FRANCE/SPAIN/NETHERLANDS/UK, 1982

 

THE STATE OF THINGS is a highly personal film about filmmaking in Europe and America. A film crew finds itself stranded at the westernmost tip of Europe, where the director, Friedrich Munro (Patrick Bauchau), his cameraman (Sam Fuller), scriptwriter, and actors have been abandoned by their producer. After shooting their last feet of film, there is nothing left for them to do but wait. Friedrich finally sets out for Los Angeles to search for the missing producer (Allen Garfield) and finds him hiding in his RV on Sunset Boulevard, attempting to evade a group of unscrupulous gangsters. Friedrich unwillingly finds himself pulled into the underworld conflict, armed with only a Super 8 camera for protection. (100 mins.) 

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Sun, Mar 13, 2016
at 4:30 PM

THE AMERICAN FRIEND
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY/FRANCE, 1977

 

Jonathan Zimmermann (Bruno Ganz) believes that he will soon die of leukemia. An unscrupulous American named Tom Ripley (Dennis Hopper) learns of his plight and exploits Zimmermann’s illness for his own purposes. He introduces Zimmermann to underworld figure Minot (Gérard Blain), who offers to hire the terminally ill man as a professional hit man. He is to be paid extravagantly for his work, thus enabling him to leave something behind for his wife (Lisa Kreuzer) and their child. What does he have to lose, since he is going to die anyway? The cast of Wenders’ film includes not only the directors Hopper and Blain but also Hollywood legends Sam Fuller and Nicholas Ray, as well as Peter Lilienthal, Daniel Schmid, and Jean Eustache. (126 mins.) 

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Sun, Mar 13, 2016
at 7:15 PM

PARIS, TEXAS
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY/FRANCE/UK/US, 1984

 

This unconventional road movie is based on a script by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Sam Shepard and tells the story of Travis (Harry Dean Stanton), a man who one day wanders out of Mexico and into the blazing heat of the South Texas desert. Travis does not speak a word and seems to have lost much of his memory, but he is driven by a desire to find and reunite his family: his young wife, Jane (Nastassja Kinski), whom he estranged through his pathological jealousy, and his seven-year-old son, Hunter (Hunter Carson). Travis is helped in his quest by his brother Walt (Dean Stockwell) and Walt’s wife Ann (Aurore Clément), who have cared for Travis’s son in the years he’s been missing. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival.” The movie lacks any of the gimmicks used to pump up emotion and add story interest, because it doesn’t need them: It is fascinated by the sadness of its own truth.”-- Roger Ebert. (148 mins.) 

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Sat, Mar 19, 2016
at 7 PM

WINGS OF DESIRE
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY/FRANCE, 1987

 

WINGS OF DESIRE marked Wenders’ homecoming and was his first German film after eight years in America. The main characters are guardian angels—benevolent, invisible beings in trench coats—who listen to the thoughts of mortals and attempt to comfort them. One of them, Damiel (Bruno Ganz), wishes to become human after he falls in love with the beautiful trapeze artist Marion (Solveig Dommartin). Actor Peter Falk, playing himself, helps Damiel during his transformation by introducing him to life’s little pleasures. The film is narrated from the perspective of the angels, who see the world in black and white. Only when Damiel becomes human does a world of color reveal itself to him. (128 mins.) 

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Mon, Mar 21, 2016
at 7 PM

THE LEFT-HANDED WOMAN
DIRECTOR: PETER HANDKE
WEST GERMANY, 1978

 

“Writer-director Handke and producer Wenders present a new digital restoration of this exquisite—and little seen—film of the 1970s. A married woman living in the suburbs of Paris separates from her husband and begins adjusting to a life alone. She translates Flaubert, putters around the kitchen, picks up her father from the train station, and hikes with her son. As the banal particulars of her daily routine proceed in a rigorously poetic fashion, every spoken word and gesture feels deliberate and momentous. With its austere compositions, minimal camera movement, and delicately restrained performances by Edith Clever and Bruno Ganz, THE LEFT-HANDED WOMAN is a powerful meditation on autonomy, self-preservation, and liberation. Handke cited Chantal Akerman as a key influence when the film premiered at Cannes, though the family dramas of Yasujiro Ozu seem equally apt.”—The Museum of Modern Art. (115 mins.) 

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Sun, Mar 27, 2016
at 7 PM

TOKYO-GA
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY/US, 1985

Seeking to recover the past from the tide of time, Wenders travels to Tokyo in order to find traces of the cinema of famed Japanese auteur Yasujiro Ozu within the modern-day metropolis. Lacing his film with “pillow shots” in the style of Ozu and featuring profoundly moving interviews with Ozu collaborators Chishu Ryu and Yûharu Atsuta, Wenders’ film becomes a lament for Ozu’s Tokyo, contrasting the cinema of his idol with images of neon pachinko parlors, bullet trains, and high-rise office towers. Wenders’ film becomes a portrait not only of one of cinema’s most singular artists but also of a city ready to unceremoniously usher in the postmodern era. “If there were still sanctuaries in our century . . . if there was something like a ‘holy treasure of cinema,’ for me, that would be the work of Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu. Ozu’s work doesn’t need my appraisal. And such a ‘holy treasure of cinema’ is just imaginary. So my journey to Tokyo was no pilgrimage. I was curious to see if I could discover something from this time, whether something was left of his work, images perhaps, or people even . . . Or if in the twenty years since Ozu’s death so much changed in Tokyo that there was nothing left to be found.”—Wim Wenders. (92 mins.) 

PRECEDED BY 

REVERSE ANGLE 

WEST GERMANY/FRANCE/US 1982 

DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS 

 

“REVERSE ANGLE was my first diary film. It is about “new wave music” (among others Jim Jarmusch’s Del Byzanteens), about straying in New York, about the editing process of HAMMETT in the presence of Francis Ford Coppola, about a novel by Emanuel Bove and about Edward Hopper. And, somehow, the whole thing was a reflection about filmmaking in Europe and America.”—Wim Wenders. (17 mins.) 



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Fri, Apr 1, 2016
at 7 PM

NOTEBOOK ON CITIES AND CLOTHES
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY, 1989

 

This “diary film,” as Wenders calls it, investigates the similarities of the filmmaking craft to that of the Tokyo-based fashion designer Yohji Yamamoto, who, in the early 1980s, shocked and revolutionized the fashion world with his avant-garde designs. Wenders shot the film on his own, without the use of a film crew. During this unusual production, which stretched out over the course of a year, Yamamoto and Wenders became friends. “Fashion. I got nothing to do with that. At least that was my reaction when the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris asked me if I would like to make a short film about a fashion designer . . . The world of fashion. I am interested in the world, not in fashion. But maybe my judgment was premature. Why shouldn’t I try to approach the topic without prejudices? Why not look at fashion like any other industry, the film industry, for example?”—Wim Wenders. (83 mins.) 

Please note updated date and time (was 4/2 at 2pm).


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Sat, Apr 2, 2016
at 5 PM

UNTIL THE END OF THE WORLD
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
GERMANY/FRANCE/AUSTRAILIA/US, 1991

 

In order to enable his blind wife (Jeanne Moreau) to see, Dr. Farber (Max von Sydow) invents a process that makes it possible to transmit the images recorded in the brains of sighted people directly into the visual systems of blind people. Farber’s son Sam (William Hurt) sets out on a journey around the world in order to “see” and record the various stations of his mother’s life for her. Struck by the poetry of his journey, the Frenchwoman Claire (Solveig Dommartin) falls in love and sets out in pursuit of him. She, in turn, is followed by author Eugene (Sam Neill), who is recording her adventure. Eugene notes: “In the beginning was the word. What would happen if only the image remained in the end?” Forced by his distributors to hack down his original eight-hour cut to a more commercially viable three hours, UNTIL THE END OF THE WORLD was critically and financially unsuccessful upon its release and Wenders himself was thoroughly dissatisfied with the result. However, two years after its initial 1990 theatrical run, Wenders created a director’s cut of the film which--at a length of almost five hours-- lives up to his intentions and to the epic nature of the story. (295 mins.) 

Please note updated start time (was 4pm).


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Sun, Apr 3, 2016
at 4:30 PM

BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
GERMANY/FRANCE/US/UK/CUBA, 1999

 

In 1998, Wenders embarked on a trip to Havana with his old friend and collaborator Ry Cooder, who wanted to record a series of musical collaborations with local Cuban musicians. Accompanied by a small film crew, Wenders was able to capture the inception and execution of a project which grew into a worldwide cultural phenomenon. Calling themselves the Buena Vista Social Club, the collective of Cuban musicians (many of whom were unknown outside of their native country) recorded fourteen songs over the course of only six days. The resulting album, entitled The Buena Vista Social Club, was nominated for multiple industry awards and has to date sold over 12 million copies. From beginning to end, Wenders was able to observe and accompany the musicians on their global and musical journey; following them as they recorded the album in Havana, then on their April 1998 trip to Amsterdam for their first-ever public performance (having never played together outside a studio), and finally to their triumphal concert at New York’s Carnegie Hall in July 1998. The resulting film is a remarkable document of cross-cultural collaboration, musical inspiration, and of the meteoric rise in worldwide fame enjoyed by some of Cuba’s most legendary and long-overlooked musicians. (105 mins.) 

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Sun, Apr 3, 2016
at 7 PM

WIM WENDERS' SHORT FILMS
DIRECTOR: WIM WENDERS
WEST GERMANY, 1967-69

 

Before delving into the world of feature filmmaking, Wenders got his start with several short films made in the last years of the 1960’s, which he shot on both 16mm and 35mm film stock. The films include the structuralist experiment in color entitled SAME PLAYER SHOOTS AGAIN (1967); SILVER CITY (1969), one of Wenders’ student films, comprised of a series of window shots from his Munich residence set to 78r PM records found in his school’s attic; the “slapstick” POLICE FILM (1969), dealing with the police response to Munich’s 1968 student riots; the mysterious Dylan- and Coltrane-inspired ALABAMA: 2000 LIGHT YEARS FROM HOME (1969); and 3 AMERICAN LPs (1969), which explores the relationship between the German landscape and American rock ‘n’ roll. (90 mins.) 

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