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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
FROM BOMBAY TO BOLLYWOOD: 50 YEARS OF INDIAN CINEMA

Indian cinema boasts the most prolific output of any national film industry on the planet—its films, stars, and songs are beloved at home and by millions around the world, yet remains largely unknown to many audiences in the West. Often incorrectly referred to as “Bollywood” (a term which actually only applies to the Hindi cinema of Mumbai, one of many film production centers in the country), Indian cinema is much more than the “song and a wedding” fare typically referenced in Western pop culture. Blending the traditions of musical storytelling and popular myth with dozens of different genres—often all in the same movie—Indian cinema eschews easy classification and demands recognition for its diversity and vitality. This ten-film retrospective offers a primer on popular Indian cinema and a rare opportunity to celebrate these classic films as they are meant to be seen—big movies on the big screen. 

 

Sponsored by East India Co. Grill & Bar, Anjali School of Dance, and DJ Anjali and the Incredible Kid. 



Sat, Jan 9, 2016
at 12 PM

Watch Trailer
AWAARA
DIRECTOR: RAJ KAPOOR
INDIA, 1951

Known as “The Showman” by his contemporaries, Raj Kapoor produced, directed and starred in some of the most lasting classics of Indian cinema’s Golden Age, including BARSAAT (1949) and SHREE 420 (1955). Released a scant five years after India achieved its independence from Britain when Indian national cinema was still getting its footing, AWAARA stars Kapoor and his longtime muse (and off screen love) Nargis, and tells the story of the intertwining lives of a poor tramp and the privileged young woman he loves. Effortlessly blending comedy, romance, and pointed social commentary, Kapoor’s film nods to the classics of Hollywood cinema while forging a distinctly Indian identity all its own. “Kapoor’s singular and gargantuan talent subsumes a variety of influences and affinities—Chaplin, Frank Capra, Orson Welles—with even a touch of Russ Meyer apparent in the later work.”—Elliot Stein, “Raj Kapoor: The Showman Auteur of Indian Cinema.” (193 mins.) 

 

Archival 35mm print courtesy of TIFF's Film Reference Library. A performance by students at the Anjali School of Dance will precede the film. Film will be followed by a reception at the Portland Art Museum’s Mark Building with refreshments provided by East India Co. Grill and Bar and Sierra Nevada and music by DJ Anjali and the Incredible Kid. 


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Sun, Jan 10, 2016
at 6:30 PM

Watch Trailer
PYAASA
DIRECTOR: GURU DUTT
INDIA, 1957

 

Sensitive, lyrical filmmaker Guru Dutt was only 39 when he died of an apparent suicide, but he nevertheless left behind a lasting mark on India’s cinematic history. PYAASA (“Thirsty”), the most autobiographical of his works, is the story of a struggling young poet (Dutt) whose genius goes unrecognized until he is mistaken for dead and his work is “posthumously” published through the efforts of a golden-hearted prostitute (Waheeda Rehman). Suffused with an air of romantic longing, PYAASA is both a celebration of the creative spirit and a harsh condemnation of society’s hypocritical attitude towards artists. Of all the remarkable films produced during Indian Cinema’s Golden Age, this is “the most soulfully romantic of the lot.”—Richard Corliss, Time Magazine. (146 mins.) 

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Sat, Jan 16, 2016
at 1 PM

Watch Trailer
MOTHER INDIA
DIRECTOR: MEHBOOB KHAN
INDIA, 1957

 

Unabashedly patriotic, MOTHER INDIA is an epic celebration of the indomitable spirit that weathered seemingly insurmountable hardships following the country’s independence from Britain. Allegorically told through the many trials and tribulations faced by Radha, a poor village woman (played from youth to old age by charismatic superstar Nargis), the story follows its heroine as she weathers the storms of abandonment, destitution, floods, and fires with the same steely, selfless resolve. Often compared to GONE WITH THE WIND for its epic scope, it was the first Indian film to be nominated for the Best Foreign Film Academy Award. “A defining film in the history of Bollywood. . .often said to have helped set the pattern for the nearly 50 years of Indian film that followed it.”—The New York Times. (172 mins.) 

 

35mm print courtesy of BFI Distribution. 


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Sun, Jan 17, 2016
at 2 PM

Watch Trailer
CHARULATA
DIRECTOR: SATYAJIT RAY
INDIA, 1965

 

The personal favorite film of famed Bengali director Satyajit Ray (THE APU TRILOGY), CHARULATA tells the story of the titular lonely housewife of an affluent Bengali family. While her husband spends his days toiling at his beloved newspaper, Charulata paces the confines of her mansion like a caged bird, dreaming of becoming a writer and breaking free of her restrictive life. The catalyst for rebellion arrives in the form of her husband’s handsome cousin, who inspires her to both pick up a pen and fall in love. The simple tale is sensitively rendered through Madhabi Mukherjee’s inspired portrayal of Charulata, which offers glimpses of the hidden fires burning beneath her seemingly restrained demeanor. With this exquisitely shot, deeply felt film, “Ray effortlessly transcends categorization; words like ‘realist’, ‘humanist’ and ‘miniaturist’ fall pitifully short of describing what he was capable of.”—British Film Institute. (117 mins.) 

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Sun, Jan 24, 2016
at 3 PM

Watch Trailer
SHOLAY
DIRECTOR: RAMESH SIPPY
INDIA, 1975

 

Often credited as the most popular film in the history of India and perhaps the one with the greatest impact on the India’s pop culture, SHOLAY’s stunning scenes have retained iconic status. Legendary stars Dharmendra and Amitabh Bachchan—here at the height of his “angry young man” persona—are charismatic outlaws recruited by a former policeman to help bring down a ruthless bandit. With nods to the Spaghetti westerns of Sergio Leone, SHOLAY is considered one of the great examples of the genre mixing masala film, here blending romance, action, buddy film, slapstick comedy and melodrama into one dizzyingly entertaining spectacle. “There are many ways to achieve greatness and the way here is with heroism, villainy, redemption, revenge, true love, and as many stars as there are in the sky.”—Rogerebert.com. (204 mins.) 

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Sun, Jan 31, 2016
at 4 PM

Watch Trailer
SALAAM BOMBAY!
DIRECTOR: MIRA NAIR
INDIA, 1988

 

Tender in its compassion for its young subjects and unflinching in its portrayal of the harsh realities of life on the streets of Bombay, SALAAM BOMBAY! tells the story of Krishna, a young boy who must fend for himself as he struggles to earn 500 rupees to pay for his brother’s damaged bike. “A lively, strangely celebratory look at the resilience of India’s street children. It’s a savvy, sentimentalized first feature by director Mira Nair, a documentarian who finds innocence and a harsh playfulness in this asphalt nursery.”—The Washington Post. Nominated for the 1989 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. (114 mins.) 

 

35mm print courtesy of the Harvard Film Archive. Special thanks to Jeremy Rossen and Mark Johnson.


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Sat, Feb 6, 2016
at 6 PM

Watch Trailer
SATYA
DIRECTOR: RAM GOPAL VARMA
INDIA, 1998

 

SATYA, a surprise breakout hit, has been critically lauded for its realistic depiction of gang violence in Mumbai, and was eventually credited as having ushered in the genre of Mumbai noir. A mysterious young man named Satya (J.D. Chakravarthy) becomes embroiled in a gangland turf war, and quickly finds himself in over his head as he struggles to keep his violent life of crime secret from the object of his affections (Urmila Matondkar.) Varma skillfully paints a complex portrait of the criminal underworld in which every character exists not in black and white, but in unsettling shades of gray. “Rejoice. India’s answer to Quentin Tarantino is here. . .Ram Gopal Varma belts it out straight, like a prize-boxer delivering a knockout punch.”—Filmfare Magazine. (171 mins.) 

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Sun, Feb 7, 2016
at 6 PM

Watch Trailer
DILWALE DULHANIA LE JAYENGE
DIRECTOR: ADITYA CHOPRA
1995

 

One of India’s the best-loved romances is also its longest running: the film is still in its original theatrical release, having recently celebrated its 20th year at the Maratha Mandir theatre in Mumbai. Chopra’s directorial debut broke box-office records and made superstars out of its two talented young leads, Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol, who play Raj and Simran, two non-resident Indians who meet on holiday in Europe and fall in love. Even though Simran’s marriage has already been arranged to another man, Raj follows Simran to India to win over her parents and make her his bride. The film’s enormous popularity speaks to its universal appeal: it embraces both the romanticism of following one’s heart and the importance of family. “One of the world’s favorite films. Raj and Simran…are among the immortal screen couples.”—Scott Jordan Harris, Rogerebert.com. (181 mins.) 

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Sun, Mar 6, 2016
at 3 PM

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DEVDAS
DIRECTOR: SANJAY LEELA BHANSALI
INDIA, 2002

 

Operatic in every sense of the word, Bhansali’s adaptation of the legendary Bengali novel features dazzling sets and costumes, impossibly beautiful stars, and stunning musical numbers. When star-crossed childhood sweethearts (Shah Rukh Khan and former Miss World Aishwarya Rai) are wrenched apart by circumstance and harsh societal strictures, it sends them both into a tragic downward spiral. An opulent spectacle and a grand, sweeping eulogy to eternal love lost, “DEVDAS has a grandeur the old Hollywood moguls would have loved.”— Richard Corliss, Time Magazine. (185 mins.) 

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Sat, Mar 12, 2016
at 2 PM

Watch Trailer
LAGAAN
DIRECTOR: ASHUTOSH GOWARIKER
INDIA, 2001

 

At the height of the British Raj (colonial rule) in the district of Champaner, extreme drought forces a poor village to appeal to the local governor for relief from their high taxes (“lagaan”). When the handsome young villager Bhuvan insults the commanding officer of the cantonment, the village is offered a wager: beat the British officers in a game of cricket and enjoy three years free of tax—or lose, and pay triple tax. Nominated for the 2002 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and featuring an exuberant soundtrack from renowned composer A.R. Rahman (SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE), LAGAAN is a timeless, endlessly entertaining fable—not to mention the best epic-sports-movie-musical-romance you’ll ever see (no previous knowledge of cricket required). “The answer to those who ask why they don’t make movies like they used to: They do, but in India.”—Jami Bernard, New York Daily News. (225 mins.) 

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