Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Friday Film Club

 

Our inaugural Friday Film Club discussion series—presented monthly when the Portland Art Museum’s galleries are open late on Friday evenings—features works with implicit or explicit focus on landscape: rural and urban, physical and emotional. Presented in conjunction with the Museum’s “Seeing Nature” exhibition, on view October 10-January 8, we hope these films will spark dialogue, both between audience members and between artistic mediums. The screenings are accompanied by post-film discussions led by a Museum docent, sometimes with a short exhibition tour component. Special Admission: $5. 



Fri, Nov 20, 2015
at 5:30 PM

THE GREAT NORTHWEST
DIRECTOR: MATT MCCORMICK
US, 2012

 

Portland filmmaker Matt McCormick’s film is inspired by—and recreates—a 3,200-mile road trip made in 1958 by four Seattle women who recorded their journey in an elaborate scrapbook of photos, postcards, brochures, and receipts. Fifty years after their trip, McCormick found the scrapbook in a thrift store and, charmed, set out to re-trace their route, searching out every stop that the ladies had so lovingly documented five decades earlier. The resulting film juxtaposes the land and landmarks then and now, a double portrait capturing the eternal and the new. “Like McCormick’s other quasi-documentary film projects, THE GREAT NORTHWEST is notable for the sheer visual pleasure that it offers viewers. McCormick is very patient with his camera and he draws on a talented photographic eye to deliver prolonged shots that can’t be described as anything other than lovely.”—Megan Driscoll, Portlandart.net 

( 70 min )
^ Top

Fri, Dec 11, 2015
at 5:30 PM

TASTE OF CHERRY
DIRECTOR: ABBAS KIAROSTAMI
IRAN, 1997

 

Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival and celebrated as the critical rival of his own 1994 film THROUGH THE OLIVE TREES, Abbas Kiarostami’s TASTE OF CHERRY follows a middle-aged, middle class man—possibly cut from the same cloth as Kiarostami himself—quietly resolved to some desperate purpose. As he criss-crosses the rural outskirts of Tehran in his expensive SUV, the man gives lifts to a series of strangers—a Kurdish soldier, an Afghani seminarian, a Turkish taxidermist—and then offers each a considerable sum of money if they will assist him in his terrible task. Each person he picks up has moral or ethical objections to his plight, and each symbolizes a discrete, key section of Iranian society. Kiarostami’s celebrated poetic humanism is evidenced throughout the film; his noted formalism—unique blurring of fact and fiction, documentary and drama—for which he is so well known, is here held in check until the film’s last, enigmatic finale. “TASTE OF CHERRY actually says a great deal about what it was like to be alive in the 1990s, and despite its somber theme, this masterpiece has a startling epilogue that radiates with wonder and euphoria.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum. 

( 98 min )
^ Top


   
© 2009-2017 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development