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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

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Volume 5
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Volume 3
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Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
ORSON WELLES AT 100

The late film scholar Gilberto Perez referred to Orson Welles as “a director with an immediately recognizable style if there ever was one.” Perhaps no other filmmaker, with the exception of Alfred Hitchcock or Stanley Kubrick, has been as globally discussed by film critics and connoisseurs. Welles’ films—many of which were made under considerable scrutiny and now precariously exist in contested multiple versions—remain enduring cinematic pleasures of the highest order.

On the occasion of his centennial year, the Northwest Film Center offers a primer of Welles’ work. While it proudly features some of his most lauded masterpieces, the series also dives deeper into some of Welles’ lesser-known work, as well as a handful of films he acted in and sometimes surreptitiously produced and directed. In grasping to capture Welles’ allure, film critic Jonathan Rosenbaum’s reflection speaks for many cinema lovers: “Though I wouldn’t necessarily call him my favorite, he remains the most fascinating for me, both due to the sheer size of his talent, and the ideological force of his work and his working methods...a major part of Welles’ talent as a filmmaker consisted of his refusal to repeat himself—a compulsion to keep moving creatively that consistently worked against his credentials as a ‘bankable’ director, if only because banks rely on known quantities rather than on experiments.”



Sat, Dec 12, 2015
at 7 PM

Mon, Dec 14, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
CITIZEN KANE
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
1941

Routinely voted—by critics, scholars, and filmmakers—as one of the best films ever made, CITIZEN KANE is many things at once: the first film of one of the 20th century’s most beloved and iconic artist-entertainers, the supreme technical achievement of the era’s classical Hollywood cinema, and a narrative delight of the highest order. Ostensibly retracing the life and loves of ambitious newspaper magnate Charles Foster Kane (Welles), the film is really a meditation on loss of innocence and the collapse of the American Dream, long before those tropes became well-worn. With one foot in the past and one in the future, CITIZEN KANE is the “film that introduces the modern cinema, though it also represents the culmination of the classical.”— Francesco Casetti, “The Eye of the Century.”

( 119 min )


35mm print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive.


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Sun, Dec 13, 2015
at 7 PM

Tue, Dec 15, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US, 1942

Following the success of CITIZEN KANE, Welles embarked upon one of the most famously disastrous productions of the 1940s. THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS tells the story of a wealthy family unable to adapt to the changing times in the years following the Industrial Revolution. Despite the fact that he lost control of the editing of the film (which had a full hour of footage cut by the studio) when he left to shoot his ill-fated Latin American film IT’S ALL TRUE, THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS—narrated by Welles and starring regular collaborators Joseph Cotten and Agnes Moorehead—remains one of the classics of the Hollywood studio era and one of Welles’ greatest creations, featuring his trademark deep focus shooting and bravura ensemble direction.

( 88 min )


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Thu, Dec 17, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
JOURNEY INTO FEAR
DIRECTOR: NORMAN FOSTER
US, 1943

Packed to the gills with his Mercury Theatre players, JOURNEY INTO FEAR is a Welles product through-and-through (though it was directed by Norman Foster, a previous collaborator of Welles’.) In the end Welles is only credited with acting in the film, donning a thick Turkish accent in his role as Colonel Haki, leader of a secret police force, who meets Graham (Joseph Cotten), an American trying to return home from Russia but who is being hunted by Nazis in Istanbul. Welles and his Mercury cohorts were famously fired from RKO during post-production, leaving the film to be cut by the studio, but it remains a unique entry in his filmography.

( 68 min )


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Fri, Dec 18, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
JANE EYRE
DIRECTOR: ROBERT STEVENSON
1943

Charlotte Brönte’s gothic 1847 novel about a penniless girl’s resolute journey through life stars Welles as the mysterious, brooding Edward Rochester, wealthy lord of Thornfield Hall who employs (and falls in love with) the titular heroine (Joan Fontaine). We follow Jane from girlhood through her early adulthood, from brutal reform schools to her work as governess of Thornfield and finally through her turbulent courtship with the mercurial Rochester. While Welles is credited as one of three producers, his considerable influence looms large within the film’s thick, intense atmosphere, infused throughout with Bernard Herrmann’s magnificently understated score.

( 97 min )


Archival 35mm print courtesy 20th Century Fox Archive.


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Sat, Dec 19, 2015
at 2 PM

Mon, Dec 21, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
THE THIRD MAN
DIRECTOR: CAROL REED
UK, 1948

Pulp novelist Holly Martins (Joseph Cotten) travels to shadowy postwar Vienna at the invitation of an old friend, black-market opportunist Harry Lime (Welles), only to find himself investigating his friend’s mysterious death. Thus begins this twisting, subversive tale of love, deception, and murder. Thanks to brilliant performances, Anton Karas’s famously evocative zither score, Graham Greene’s razor-sharp dialogue, and cinematographer Robert Krasker’s dramatic use of light and shadow, Reed’s THE THIRD MAN has continued to grow in stature as the years pass. “One great shot after another. I’ve seen it 50 times and it’s still magic.”—Roger Ebert.

( 104 min )


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Sat, Dec 19, 2015
at 4:30 PM

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THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US, 1948

Here writer/director Welles smolders alongside bombshell Rita Hayworth (Welles’ second wife) in a wildly stylish film noir that was years ahead of its time. Welles plays a tough, footloose Irish sailor who takes a job on a wealthy lawyer’s private yacht, only to fall in love with the sinister man’s beautiful wife. The story’s multiple double-crosses come to a boil in San Francisco, where some of Welles’ (and cinema’s) most memorable visualizations of a twisted world of corruption and evil unfold with surreal delight. “The film’s bravura moments resonate beyond pyrotechnics, especially the magnificent sequences of reflexive cinema in the macabre Hall of Mirrors scene and the confession of love in a ‘fishbowl’—the San Francisco Aquarium.”—Pacific Film Archive.

( 87 min )


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Sat, Dec 19, 2015
at 7 PM

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MACBETH
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US, 1948

Welles’ passion project was made at the scrappy Republic Pictures on discarded lots previously used for Roy Rogers Westerns. At the time of its production it was only the fourth Hollywood adaptation of a Shakespeare work. Despite its low-budget origins, MACBETH retains a striking visual style consistent with Welles’ earlier films in addition to a psychological intensity found in few films of the period. Welles stars at Macbeth, an ambitious Scottish general intent on acquiring power by any means necessary, whose moral corruption is spurred on by Jeanette Nolan’s conniving Lady Macbeth. Welles dives into the role, his immense dramatic powers channeled through a thick Scottish brogue.

( 107 min )


35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive; restoration funding provided by The Film Foundation and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.


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Sun, Dec 20, 2015
at 4:30 PM

BLACK MAGIC
DIRECTOR: GEORGE RATOFF
US/ITALY, 1949

Meteoric rise and precipitous fall—hallmarks of Welles’ work, especially in the 1940s—are given the magical treatment in BLACK MAGIC, an adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ 1848 novel CAGLIOSTRO. Welles plays the magician Cagliostro, who, following a literally torturous childhood, rises to fame after he learns the art of hypnosis and uses his new skill to exact revenge on the court of Louis XV. The film bears many of Welles’ signature cinematic flourishes, including stunning use of point-of-view camera.

( 105 min )


35mm preservation print courtesy of the Library of Congress.


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Sun, Dec 20, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
OTHELLO
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US/ITALY/MOROCCO/FRANCE, 1952

Among Welles’ finished films, OTHELLO has one of the most troubled production histories. Financed largely out-of-pocket and shot intermittently over a three-year period, OTHELLO nevertheless remains one of Welles’ most beautiful works; a compact, powerful drama fraught with taut atmospheric pleasure. As with MACBETH before it, Welles takes liberties with Shakespeare’s original work, which concerns the Moorish general Othello (Welles) and his new wife Desdemona (Suzanne Cloutier), who are manipulated and betrayed by their jealous subordinates. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

( 90 min )


New digital restoration of the 1992 reconstruction, originally supervised by Beatrice Welles-Smith.


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Tue, Dec 22, 2015
at 7 PM

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THE STRANGER
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US, 1946

Welles’ post-war thriller tackles Nazism head-on as UN War Crimes Inspector Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) searches for Welles’ fugitive Franz Kindler, an architect of the Holocaust now posing as a schoolteacher in small-town America. Kindler, now Charles Rankin, is married to the daughter of a Supreme Court justice and lives an unassuming life. But when Wilson releases Kindler’s former associate (Konstantin Shayne), the Nazi fugitive falls squarely in Wilson’s crosshairs. His secret double life is threatened with exposure, and he’ll do anything to keep it under wraps.

( 95 min )


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Sat, Dec 26, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Mon, Dec 28, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
TOUCH OF EVIL
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
US, 1958

Celebrated as one of the greatest film noirs ever made, Welles’ mid-career morality tale sees him writing, directing, and starring as detective Hank Quinlan, a corrupt, exalcoholic cop working just north of the US-Mexico border. The legendary three-minute tracking shot that opens the film introduces us to Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston), a Mexican police detective who begins to investigate the mysterious death-by-explosion of two Americans at the border crossing. As Vargas uncovers more and more layers of corruption in the unnamed border town, Quinlan simultaneously falls off the wagon and tightens his deadly grip around Vargas and his comely new bride (Janet Leigh).

( 95 min )


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Sat, Dec 26, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Dec 27, 2015
at 4:30 PM

CONFIDENTIAL REPORT AKA MR. ARKADIN
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
FRANCE/SPAIN/SWITZERLAND, 1955

Bearing key similarities to THE THIRD MAN, Welles’ noir concerns small-time smuggler Guy Van Stratten (Robert Arden), who overhears a dying man whisper the name “Gregory Arkadin.” Armed with this clue and in search of blackmail money, Van Stratten works his way into the inner circle of well-to-do amnesiac Arkadin. Arkadin hires Van Stratten to research his former life before the amnesia, but as Van Stratten digs deeper people begin turning up dead. Full of delirious canted angles and gorgeous location photography spanning Europe and Mexico, CONFIDENTIAL REPORT is “extraordinary, and unjustly unrecognized.”—Richard Brody, The New Yorker.

( 93 min )


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Sun, Dec 27, 2015
at 7 PM

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COMPULSION
DIRECTOR: RICHARD FLEISCHER
US, 1959

If anyone was born to play a high-powered, world-weary lawyer defending two murderers against the death penalty, it was Orson Welles. With archetypal bravado, but never looking more exhausted, Welles defends Judd and Artie (Dean Stockwell and Bradford Dillman), who have killed a schoolboy seemingly out of pampered, silver-spoon boredom. Based upon the infamous real-life Leopold and Loeb murders and shot in beautiful black-and-white CinemaScope with frames populated by ornate locations—libraries, Ivies, courtrooms, and well-heeled brats—Fleischer’s film showcases Welles’ range while offering trenchant commentary on a topic still very relevant today.

( 103 min )


New digital restoration courtesy of 20th Century Fox Archive.


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Fri, Jan 1, 2016
at 7 PM

Sat, Jan 2, 2016
at 2 PM

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THE TRIAL
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
FRANCE/WEST GERMANY/ITALY, 1962

Welles translates one of Franz Kafka’s best-known literary works into a disorienting black-and-white cinematic world of crime and punishment. After relatively anonymous bank officer Josef K. (Anthony Perkins) is spontaneously arrested and charged with an unnamed crime, he struggles in vain to discover exactly what it is he has done. While Kafka’s novel is famed for its psychological modernism, Welles’ film delves deep into the psyche of Josef through Perkins’ nervous tics and the unnamed city’s white walls and modernist cubes. Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide.

( 119 min )


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Sat, Jan 2, 2016
at 4:30 PM

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MAGICIAN: THE ASTONISHING LIFE AND WORK OF ORSON WELLES
DIRECTOR: CHUCK WORKMAN
US, 2014

“Oscar-winner Chuck Workman’s (famed for his Academy Award clip montages and iconic trailers) impressive, comprehensive documentary tells the tragic, extraordinary story of Orson Welles, a great filmmaking genius whose masterpieces were interspersed with films compromised by studio intervention or never completed at all. Workman tells Welles’s story through a wealth of interviews with the director and actor, an impressive assortment of clips, and testimonies by luminaries including Martin Scorsese, Peter Bogdanovich, George Lucas, Walter Murch, and Steven Spielberg.”—Telluride Film

 

Festival.

( 91 min )


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Sat, Jan 2, 2016
at 7 PM

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CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT AKA FALSTAFF
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
FRANCE/SPAIN/SWITZERLAND, 1965

His third “finished” Shakespeare adaptation, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT, sees Welles dulling his edges a bit in offering up a highly poetic vision of Falstaff, a recurring character in the Bard’s works. Falstaff, the rotund sidekick of the devious Prince Hal (Keith Baxter), plays audience proxy as the Prince ascends to the throne following the defeat of Henry IV’s (John Gielgud) enemies. “The one Welles film that deserves to be called lovely. Restrained and even serene, it is ample proof of how sensitive and subtle an artist he is.”—Dave Kehr, The Chicago Reader.

( 113 min )


 

New digital restoration courtesy of Janus Films.


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Sun, Jan 3, 2016
at 4:30 PM

Mon, Jan 4, 2016
at 7 PM - Canceled due to inclement weather

Watch Trailer
F FOR FAKE
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
FRANCE/IRAN/WEST GERMANY, 1973

F FOR FAKE, a pseudo-documentary revolving around the shadowy world of art forgery, sees Welles at his most globe-trotting and literally magical. Beginning as a kind of portrait of notorious forger Elmyr De Hory, the film quickly spirals away from any linear narrative, instead becoming a loose tapestry of forgers and fakers, not least of whom is Welles himself. “Hoax-biographer” Clifford Irving and Welles’ muse Oja Kodar appear at various points; the pace steadily increases, and the narratives interweave to the point of dizzying disorientation. “There is fascination and poignancy in seeing Welles’ elegant retreat into this hall of mirrors.”—Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian.

( 89 min )


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Sun, Jan 3, 2016
at 7 PM

THE IMMORTAL STORY
DIRECTOR: ORSON WELLES
FRANCE, 1968

Welles’ first color film—significant considering the development of scores of color processes since the 1920s—tells the story of Clay (Welles), a wealthy but aging Macao merchant, who, upon hearing a story in which a young sailor is paid to impregnate an elderly man’s wife, decides to recreate the legend for himself. The problem: he’s unmarried. Enter Virginie (Jeanne Moreau), the daughter of Clay’s former business partner, “hired” to be Clay’s wife and enact his twisted fantasy. However, Virginie has a score to settle with Clay and the myth turns upon him. “Thematically and poetically it exemplifies Welles’ late lyrical manner. . . It’s awkward yet exquisite.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum, The Chicago Reader.

( 70 min )


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