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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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Volume 1

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Volume 1

2009
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Volume 1

2008
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Volume 4
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Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
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Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
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Volume 4
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Volume 1

2005
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Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
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Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
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Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
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1999
Volume 5
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1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
(Re)Discoveries: New Restorations, New Prints

As cinema moves into its second century, the preservation of classic films is finding new life through digital technology and collaborative efforts by film archives and studios worldwide. At the same time, appreciation for the glories of 35mm film prints and the opportunity for new generations to see the originals on the big screen remains a distinct pleasure. The Film Center is pleased to present this selection of iconic classics enjoying a second life via restoration or preservation, either by digital magic or lovingly made film prints. We hope you’ll discover something new, or see a longtime favorite in an entirely new light.



Fri, Sep 11, 2015
at 8 PM

Sun, Sep 13, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
LOSING GROUND
DIRECTOR: KATHLEEN COLLINS
US, 1982

Collins’ film, which she wrote and directed, follows a trapped philosophy professor (Seret Scott) whose artist husband sells a piece to a major museum, subsequently entering into an affair while the couple tries to navigate their increasingly tense relationship. At its core a story about creative exploration and existential longing for true experience within the twin contexts of marriage and the postmodern world, LOSING GROUND is credited as the first feature directed by an African American woman and a key entry into the new American cinema of the 1980s. “The clothes the characters wear, how they talk and what they talk about, the grainy texture of the images and the weariness of the world they capture — all of these emerge from a time capsule devoted to an era that doesn’t quite have a name. But partly because those images have remained unseen for so long, and partly because Ms. Collins, who died in 1988, was such a bold and idiosyncratic filmmaker, LOSING GROUND also feels like news, like a bulletin from a vital and as-yet-unexplored dimension of reality.”—A.O. Scott, The New York Times. (86 min)

 

Restoration supervised by Nina Lorez Collins, digital transfer by DuArt Labs, sound transfer by FotoKem, DCP by DI Factory, Warsaw. Thanks to Terri Francis, Ann Horton-Line, Brian Meacham and the Yale Film Study Center.


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Sat, Sep 12, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 13, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
LIMITE
DIRECTOR: MARIO PEIXOTO
BRAZIL, 1931

Revered as perhaps the greatest Brazilian film ever produced, Brazilian novelist Peixoto’s lone film is deeply expressionistic, created following a trip to Europe where the writer immersed himself in the work of directors Fritz Lang and F.W. Murnau, among others. Peixoto’s fever dream concerns three lost souls marooned on a boat; through flashbacks, he pieces their stories together via a burst of beautifully rippling, surreal tableaux that recall Luis Buñuel. Profoundly silent after Hollywood and Europe had long since moved to sound filmmaking but featuring music by modernist composers Satie, Debussy, and Stravinsky, LIMITE is “a glorious film, a work of exquisite, handcrafted visual beauty that exceeds its reputation.”—Kent Jones. (114 min.)

Restored by The Film Foundation’s World Cinema Project in collaboration with the Cinemateca Brasileira with funding provided by Doha Film Institute, Qatar Airways, Qatar Museum Authority and Cartier. Restoration carried out at Cineteca di Bologna/L’Immagine Ritrovata laboratory and Cinemateca Brasileira.


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Fri, Sep 25, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 26, 2015
at 7 PM

Mon, Sep 28, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
JANE B. PAR AGNÈS V.
DIRECTOR: AGNÈS VARDA
FRANCE, 1988

Varda’s freewheeling documentary, never before released in the United States, is a deeply idiosyncratic portrait of the famed French actress, singer and cultural muse Jane Birkin. The film—ostensibly spanning the decade from age 30 to 40 and produced on the occasion of Birkin’s 40th birthday—delves us directly into Birkin’s thoughts, hopes, and fears through series of staged miniatures drawn from the history of Western art, in which Varda reconfigures famous Janes through time in Birkin’s likeness. Strewn throughout are intimate moments with Birkin and her family, showing us the private, quiet side of the star. And, as only Varda can conjure, with JANE B. PAR AGNÈS V. it’s possible to speak of a detailed, rigorous mise-en-scène, rare indeed for a so-called documentary. (97 min)

2k digital restoration from the original 35mm negative completed at Eclair Labs, supervised by Agnés Varda, with support from the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animee (CNC), Paris.

SCREENS WITH

KUNG-FU MASTER 
(AKA LE PETIT AMOUR) 
FRANCE 1988 
DIRECTOR: AGNÈS VARDA 
Varda’s son Mathieu Demy stars alongside Jane Birkin and Charlotte Gainsbourg in this tender look inside a mother-daughter-boy love triangle of sorts. Lucy (Gainsbourg) and Julien (Demy), 14-year-old schoolmates, have a kind of on-again, off-again relationship—tentative, at times cruel, at times sweet; in short, a teenage romance. But when Julien takes a liking to Lucy’s mother Mary-Jane (Birkin) and the 40-something mother of two tentatively reciprocates, the three are thrown into turmoil. Beautifully understated, and featuring gorgeous visuals and searing performances from the three leads, KUNG-FU MASTER is an underappreciated work in Varda’s substantial filmography. (80 mins.)

 

2k digital restoration from the original 35mm negative completed at Eclair Labs, supervised by Agnés Varda, with support from the Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animee (CNC), Paris.

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Sat, Sep 26, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Sep 27, 2015
at 7 PM

FROM MAYERLING TO SARAJEVO
DIRECTOR: MAX OPHÜLS
FRANCE, 1940

Banned during the German occupation of France in WWII and directly leading to Ophüls’ (LA RONDE, THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE…) exile, this opulent yet intimate film looks inside the vicissitudes of European court life in the 30 years leading up to the dual assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (John Cabot Lodge) and his lover Czech Countess Sophie Chotek (Edwige Feuillère), an event that directly precipitated the beginning of WWI. Skillfully marrying form and content, Ophüls’ fluid camera moves—anticipating his famed costume dramas to come—describe, in great detail, the miniscule events in the lives of the powerful that can shake both nations and the world. “An exemplary political film, the counterpart to Jean Renoir’s THE RULES OF THE GAME (1939) as a work of vast historical vision in a quasi-operatic form.”—Richard Brody, The New Yorker. In French with English subtitles. (95 min.)

New 35mm print courtesy of The Film Desk.


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Fri, Oct 9, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Oct 10, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Oct 11, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
ONLY ANGELS HAVE WINGS
DIRECTOR: HOWARD HAWKS
US, 1939

Hawks’ fourth film about air-bound transit stars Cary Grant as Geoff Carter, a pilot for a small airline whose main task is delivering the mail to and from a remote camp in the foothills of the Andes. Carter manages several other pilots who repeatedly take massive risks due to the treacherous terrain and the limitations of their aircraft. Bonnie (Jean Arthur) appears in the tiny outpost and, realizing the senselessness by which the men act, quickly becomes their moral compass. But when Carter’s outfit has the opportunity to secure a huge contract at great risk, the unit is forced to face a choice: immediate safety or earning a living. In a world where everyone around them stoically faces their own mortality on a daily basis, Bonnie and Carter become entangled due to their refusal in the end to uphold the status quo. (121 min.)

Restored in 4k digital from the original nitrate picture negative and composite duplicate negative by Sony Pictures Entertainment at Colorworks.


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Fri, Oct 16, 2015
at 8 PM

Sun, Oct 18, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
GASLIGHT
DIRECTOR: GEORGE CUKOR
US, 1944

Ingrid Bergman won the first of her three career Oscars for her intensely vulnerable, highly expressive work in Cukor’s taut, subtle marriage thriller. She plays opposite a suitably creepy Charles Boyer, whose psychopathic husband Gregory terrorizes Bergman’s Paula when the two move into her murdered aunt’s house. Upon learning that her aunt was murdered for a very specific reason, Paula—and her neighbors—see Gregory increasingly attempting to drive her crazy, intent on dredging up a secret long buried in the decaying Victorian mansion. Although a characteristically glossy MGM production, GASLIGHT is an underappreciated noir melodrama of the first order, foreshadowing Bergman’s character in Hitchcock’s NOTORIOUS. (114 min.)

New 35mm print courtesy Warner Brothers.


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Sat, Oct 17, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Mon, Oct 19, 2015
at 7 PM

THE BELLS OF ST. MARY’S
DIRECTOR: LEO MCCAREY
US, 1945

In one of her most radiant roles, Ingrid Bergman stars as good-natured Sister Mary Benedict, a Catholic nun at the dilapidated St. Mary’s school, which faces abrupt closure. Enter newcomer Father Chuck O’Malley (Bing Crosby), with whom Sister Mary immediately strikes up a friendly rivalry. The two must band together, however, to find a new building for the school, and fast. Meanwhile, Sister Mary endears herself to the students, helping them through tough times and even teaching one boy how to properly fistfight. One of RKO’s biggest successes of the 1940s, Bergman’s performance singlehandedly lifts the film from the sentimental, showcasing her considerable talents in a way that no other film in her career would. (126 min.)

Preserved in 4k digital by the Paramount Archives; scanning, picture restoration and color correction by Technicolor; audio restoration by Audio Mechanics.


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