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VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
The Art of Reinvention: Paul Thomas Anderson & His Influences

Paul Thomas Anderson occupies a unique position in the American film industry: a cinephile auteur working within the confines of the major Hollywood studios but making his own brand of idiosyncratic, distinctive films with an eye for art over commerce. Anderson’s films cover wide dramatic terrain, from the inner workings of American pseudo-cults in BOOGIE NIGHTS and THE MASTER, to the sprawling interrogation of family in MAGNOLIA, to the Southern California oil boom at the turn of the 20th century in THERE WILL BE BLOOD. A child of Los Angeles, his work has largely focused on the marginalia of the City of Angels, off the well-worn, glamorous path, shaping everyday lives into poetic meditations on modern existence. In addition to Anderson’s seven features we are pleased to offer 14 films that have influenced his work over the years. As all of Anderson’s films have been shot on film, most of the films in the retrospective will be screened on 35mm prints—an increasingly limited possibility in the era of digital cinema.

 

View The Art of Reinvention series trailer



Fri, Jul 24, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Jul 25, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
HARD EIGHT AKA SYDNEY
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 1996

Anderson’s first feature announced a powerful new voice in American cinema at a time when Quentin Tarantino and the Coen brothers were taking cinemas by storm with their film-history-inflected, sweeping creations. Anderson opts instead for a part-70s crime flick, part-chamber drama focused on a small group of wayward souls: Sydney (Philip Baker Hall), an aging gambler, John (John C. Reilly), a troubled young man whom Sydney takes under his wing, and Clementine (Gwyneth Paltrow), a Reno cocktail waitress. Sydney, the poker-faced moral and philosophical center of the group, leads his younger companions out of the trouble they naturally stir up, but holds a huge secret of his own, one which threatens to shatter the delicate balance they’ve created. “Movies like HARD EIGHT remind me of what original, compelling characters the movies can sometimes give us.”—Roger Ebert. (102 mins.)

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Sat, Jul 25, 2015
at 7 PM

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THE KILLING OF A CHINESE BOOKIE
DIRECTOR: JOHN CASSAVETES
US, 1976

Cassavetes’ foray into the crime genre follows small-time nightclub owner Cosmo Vitelli (Ben Gazzara), who jumps from one big debt to another when, following his pay-off of a major gambling debt, he celebrates by losing $23,000 in a poker game that same night. However, the men to whom he owes the money have other ideas about the payment, forcing Cosmo to become a hit man instead. Through his depiction of the out-of-his-element Cosmo, representing a microcosm of declining American masculinity, Gazzara delivers a tour-de-force performance. “One of the things that comes through in the film is the agony of confrontation with the powerful—an inevitable aspect of the film business, or of any business, but one that must have left scars on the soul of even as fiercely driven an artist as Cassavetes was.”—Richard Brody, The New Yorker. (135 mins.)

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Sun, Jul 26, 2015
at 7 PM

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HOUSE OF GAMES
DIRECTOR: DAVID MAMET
US, 1987

Having won the Pulitzer Prize for his play GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS, Mamet turned his attention to the silver screen with this no-nonsense, elemental peek into the world of con men—centered around card games specifically—for which he wrote the screenplay and directed. Margaret (Lindsay Crouse) is a successful psychiatrist who becomes drawn into this shady yet tantalizing world after one of her patients confesses that he’s deep in debt and in trouble, beholden to Mike (Joe Mantegna), a hustler at the House of Games. As Margaret’s curiosity about Mike’s world gets the better of her, she sets off down a path that may be irreversible. “A welcome throwback to the primacy of character and careful story construction, at a time when narrative intricacy was in short supply on American movie screens.”—Kent Jones. (102 mins.)

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Fri, Jul 31, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Aug 1, 2015
at 4 PM

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BOOGIE NIGHTS
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 1997

With a script first developed in his teens and a story previously filmed as a short, Anderson delivered this wake-up call to the American cinema, weaving a poignant, tragic-yet-ultimately hopeful tapestry of lives in the late-70s Southern California “adult film” industry. Jack Horner (Burt Reynolds), patriarch of a small studio in the San Fernando Valley, discovers Eddie Adams (Mark Wahlberg), an aimless young man, who—once Horner convinces Eddie of his potential—transforms overnight into porn juggernaut Dirk Diggler. The rotating cast of characters surrounding Jack and Dirk include matriarch Amber Waves (Julianne Moore) and budding star Rollergirl (Heather Graham), among others, who form a makeshift family, having been cast adrift from their own. “One of the most ambitious films to have come out of Hollywood in some time.”—Emanuel Levy, Variety. (155 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 1, 2015
at 7 PM

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JACKIE BROWN
DIRECTOR: QUENTIN TARANTINO
US, 1997

Tarantino’s perhaps underappreciated crime drama stars Pam Grier as Jackie Brown, a flight attendant for a small Mexican airline who smuggles drugs for Ordell Robbie (Samuel L. Jackson) on the side. Ordell has a network of smugglers and couriers working for him, but also has ATF agent Nicolette (Michael Keaton) hot on his trail. Jackie, arrested for drug possession, runs out of options and takes matters into her own hands and with the help of unassuming bondsman Max Cherry (Robert Forster), She turns the tables on everyone, although Ordell’s circle—including Bridget Fonda’s stoner surfer Melanie and Robert De Niro’s smarmy ex-con Louis—offers Jackie resistance at every step. “You savor every moment of JACKIE BROWN. Those who say it is too long have developed cinematic attention deficit disorder. I wanted these characters to live, talk, deceive, and scheme for hours and hours.”—Roger Ebert. (154 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 2, 2015
at 7 PM

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I AM CUBA
DIRECTOR: MIKHAIL KALATOZOV
CUBA/USSR, 1964

For a film ostensibly dealing with the Cuban Revolution, and produced essentially as Communist propaganda, I AM CUBA has somehow managed to transcend those typically drab descriptors to remain one of the most innovative films ever made. More impressionistic than plot-driven, Kalatozov’s detailed-yet-freewheeling look at Cuba of the late-50s and early-60s—made in collaboration with the Russian poet Evgeniy Evtushenko and cinematographer Sergey Urusevskiy (THE CRANES ARE FLYING, LETTER NEVER SENT)—is a startling vision of a country in flux, especially 50 years later as Cuba opens to the West.  “Undeniably monstrous and breathtakingly beautiful, ridiculous and awe inspiring, I AM CUBA confounds so many usual yardsticks of judgment that any kind of star rating becomes inadequate…to put it simply, the world doesn’t make allowances for a freak of this kind.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum. (141 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 7, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Aug 8, 2015
at 3 PM

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MAGNOLIA
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 1999

Anderson’s third feature takes the theme of chance and applies it to the stories of a cadre of Angelinos on the brink, where chance meetings both threaten to disrupt a fragile order and offer a shot at redemption springing from unexpected sources. Two classic, titanic father-figures structure the film’s expansive focus: dying movie mogul Earl Partridge (Jason Robards) and falling-from-grace quiz show host Jimmy Gator (Philip Baker Hall), from whose turbulent lives flower intertwining threads: estranged children, disillusioned spouses, and the aftermath of fame, both real-time and in reflection. However, with such colossal downfall comes unexpected, life-saving absolution. MAGNOLIA, a huge critical success upon release, significantly widens the scope and complexity of Anderson’s interrogation of the American family in spectacular fashion. (188 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 8, 2015
at 7 PM

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STRAY DOG
DIRECTOR: AKIRA KUROSAWA
JAPAN, 1949

Kurosawa’s neorealist, post-war tale of urban malaise follows homicide detective Murakami (Kurosawa regular Toshiro Mifune) during a sweltering heat wave in which he has his gun stolen on a crowded bus. Riddled with shame and guilt, Murakami sets out on an odyssey to recover the weapon, encountering a wide array of unique individuals as he journeys through the bombed-out depths of a nearly unrecognizable Tokyo. Kurosawa, just a year before his masterpiece RASHOMON, provides an acute study of the pathos that arises when one’s back is against the wall in all possible ways. “It’s in its suggestion, through a multiplicity of rhythms, textures, and moods, of the range of human possibilities and of multiple worlds that ignore each other, that STRAY DOG is most fervent and haunting.”—Chris Fujiwara. (122 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 9, 2015
at 6 PM

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SHORT CUTS
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US, 1993

Adapting several short stories by the Pacific Northwest author Raymond Carver and transplanting them to a bristling early-90s Los Angeles, Altman deploys his trademark restless camera coupled with overlapping, densely layered sound to concentrate on the idea of the American family in the Reagan-Bush era while exploring dominant notions of masculinity and marital fidelity.  As the several stories in the film begin to intertwine, a complex tapestry emerges—each connected to each other by thin strands. A who’s-who cast (including Robert Downey, Jr., Andie MacDowell, Tim Robbins, Lyle Lovett, and Julianne Moore, among others) flesh out Altman’s anxiety-ridden vision of modern America to create “A rich, unnerving film, as comic as it is astringent.”—Kenneth Turan, The Los Angeles Times. (187 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 14, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Aug 15, 2015
at 4:30 PM

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PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 2002

With two sprawling, epic works preceding it, with this film Anderson sought to make a “Friday night film,” a short, compact entertainment in the classical mode—as much as possible with Anderson, anyway. Reinvigorating Adam Sandler’s career as Barry Egan, a neurotic plunger salesman with seven sisters and a newfound harmonium, this unassuming, highly unconventional film finds its nucleus with a fledgling relationship between Barry and Lena Leonard (Emily Watson). However, when Barry calls a phone sex line, he’s dragged into a tangled web of fraud and threats of violence from a ring led by a sleazy Philip Seymour Hoffman. This brings Lena into danger, and Barry must act to preserve not only her safety but also, ultimately, the one meaningful relationship he’s ever forged. “What Mr. Anderson wants to do is recapture, without nostalgia, the giddiness and sweep of old movies, and his mastery of the emotional machinery of the medium is breathtaking.”—A.O. Scott, The New York Times. (95 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 15, 2015
at 7 PM

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THE BAND WAGON
DIRECTOR: VINCENTE MINNELLI
US, 1953

This Technicolor extravaganza came at a time when MGM could do no wrong, especially the Freed Unit (named for producer Arthur Freed), which released the justly famous SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN the prior year to rapturous critical and audience reception. Minnelli’s film—produced by Freed and written by the same team behind SINGIN’—while lesser known, offers much of the same visual and aural pleasure and self-reflexivity while adding a melancholic edge, focusing on declining star Tony Hunter (Fred Astaire), who seeks to revitalize his career on Broadway. However, Tony, along with co-star Gaby (Cyd Charisse), must overcome a pretentious director who seeks to turn a light comedy into a retelling of the Faust legend—and, somehow, fall in love on the way to saving the show. (112 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 16, 2015
at 7 PM

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SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER!
DIRECTOR: FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT
FRANCE, 1960

Truffaut, hot off THE 400 BLOWS, his masterpiece of adolescent dread, completely changes directions with SHOOT THE PIANO PLAYER, a film influenced by Hollywood gangster movies that trades in claustrophobic framing for black-and-white Cinemascope grandeur and invention on a small scale. “France’s Frank Sinatra” Charles Aznavour (THE TIN DRUM, UN FLIC) stars as Charlie Koller/Eduoard Saroyan, a nightclub pianist in the depths of depression following the death of his wife. Léna (Marie Dubois), a waitress, is falling in love with Charlie, but his past, unclear at best, begins to catch up with him—threatening not only his newfound love but much, much more. “Even more than BREATHLESS, this 1960 Truffaut was the movie that broke the French new wave on American audiences. The mode is romantic gangster soulfulness; the theme is the audio equivalent of a pack of Gitanes.”—J. Hoberman, The Village Voice. (92 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 21, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Aug 22, 2015
at 4 PM

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THERE WILL BE BLOOD
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 2007

Anderson’s features, while always sharpening their edges as they go, have never been hard-as-nails as this adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s novel OIL!. Daniel Day-Lewis inhabits oilman Daniel Plainview, a leathery explorer intent on creating and quickly expanding an oil empire during the late-19th Century. With his adopted son as his partner, Plainview soon strikes it rich on the land of the Sunday family—and, ultimately, the surrounding land—until he’s nearly bought up an entire town. With his newfound success, Plainview is bombarded on all sides: by an estranged brother, by a larger oil company in search of a buy-out, and finally, by Eli Sunday (Paul Dano), an old school, up-and-coming evangelist with a new church inextricably wrapped into the local fabric. Structuring the film are the pull of capital and the spirit of discovery at all costs—an American odyssey with a spiking trajectory mirroring stock market booms and crashes. (158 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 22, 2015
at 7 PM

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BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK
DIRECTOR: JOHN STURGES
US, 1955

This hard, economical, hybrid Western noir follows one-armed WWII vet John Macreedy (Spencer Tracy) as he stops in the small desert town of Black Rock, looking for a man named Komoko. Initially rebuffed, as Macreedy digs deeper, he learns that not only has the train failed to stop in Black Rock for four years, but also that Reno Smith (Robert Ryan) has been bullying the townspeople into silence about Komoko and his whereabouts. But Smith has friends as well, who threaten Macreedy at every turn, leading to an explosive finale. “You can learn more from John Sturges’ audio track on the BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK laserdisc than you can in 20 years of film school.”—Paul Thomas Anderson. (81 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 23, 2015
at 6 PM

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GIANT
DIRECTOR: GEORGE STEVENS
US, 1956

Featuring James Dean in the final role of his mercurial career, GIANT transcends it’s myth-laden reputation to be a key film of the mid-50s. A grand, sprawling epic, it  follows two generations of a Texas cattle family in the years leading up to and following World War II. Rock Hudson plays patriarch Bick opposite Elizabeth Taylor as his new bride Leslie, leading the family ranch through an oil boom against the backdrop of institutional discrimination, here focusing on Mexican immigrants employed by the family. Dean’s Jett Rink troubles the waters while working for Bick’s sister when he becomes enamored with Leslie—leading to inevitable tragedy. In addition to the excellent performances by the three leads, the film builds room for several key supporting roles, including turns by Dennis Hopper, Mercedes McCambridge, Sal Mineo, and Carroll Baker. (201 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 28, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Aug 29, 2015
at 4 PM

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THE MASTER
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 2012

WWII veteran and consummate alcoholic Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), aimless and adrift following the end of the war and his reintroduction into American society, takes up with Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and his wife Peggy (Amy Adams). Dodd, the leader of a shadowy movement called “The Cause”—which bears more than a passing resemblance to Scientology—takes a liking to Freddie, particularly his homemade moonshine, and launches into a series of increasingly odd psychological experiments on the somewhat shell-shocked vet. But while “The Cause” looks like the home Freddie has been looking for, signs point to things going sour for him because he’s simply too strange to fit in. A major critical success with Oscar nominations for all three leads, THE MASTER demonstrates that Anderson’s “cinema has entered its visionary stage—and boy, let’s hope it stays in it.”—Gabe Klinger, Cinemascope. (144 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 29, 2015
at 7 PM

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PUTNEY SWOPE
DIRECTOR: ROBERT DOWNEY, SR.
US, 1968

Downey, Sr., always the incisive provocateur, here fabricates a kind of fable in which the chairman of the board of a Madison Avenue advertising firm—seen in an entirely different light in the TV drama MAD MEN—dies and Putney Swope (Arnold Johnson in his debut role), the token black man on the board, is installed as the new chairman. In a key twist, Swope whittles down the firm’s client list, banning any work for the tobacco, alcohol, or military industries, meanwhile firing every white employee (save one), repopulating the staff with his radical friends, and renaming the company “Truth and Soul, Inc.” Through this setup, at every turn the film goes into totally unexpected territory, adding up to one of the most remarkable and subtly hilarious works of the new American cinema. (84 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 30, 2015
at 7 PM

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MELVIN AND HOWARD
DIRECTOR: JONATHAN DEMME
US, 1980

Demme’s fifth feature and first major critical success is a film dealing with the peculiarities of American lower-middle-class life that is ostensibly focused on the legend of Howard Hughes and his mysterious, nine-figure last will and testament. Hughes (Jason Robards) might be the big draw, but in this intimate work Demme is happy to follow Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat) through various trials and tribulations while he searches for his American Dream. As it turns out, a chance encounter and short car ride with Hughes will change Melvin’s life forever—much to his chagrin. A “sharp, engaging, very funny, anxious comedy.”—Vincent Canby, The New York Times. (95 mins.)

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Thu, Sep 3, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 6, 2015
at 7 PM

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THE BIG SLEEP
DIRECTOR: HOWARD HAWKS
US, 1945/46

One of the key noirs of the 1940s, THE BIG SLEEP features several legends of the American page and screen—Lauren Bacall, Humphrey Bogart, Howard Hawks, Raymond Chandler, William Faulkner, and Leigh Brackett—collaborating on a messy masterpiece that, fittingly, lacks traditional narrative logic but more than makes up for it with dripping atmosphere and fine performances. Bogart stars as private detective Philip Marlowe, hired by an elderly tycoon to ostensibly track down a man blackmailing his daughter, who has gotten into some gambling trouble. The enigmatic, sharp-talking Vivian Rutledge (Bacall)—the tycoon’s elder daughter—warns Marlowe to more nefarious things at play, and as he chances upon increasingly shady dealings, the two get closer while the treachery multiplies at a gallop. (114 mins.)

Screening on Thursday is the 1945 pre-release version, Hawks’ preferred cut. Screening on Sunday is the 1946 wide-release version, which Roger Ebert has called “a case where ‘studio interference’ was exactly the right thing.”


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Fri, Sep 4, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 5, 2015
at 4 PM

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INHERENT VICE
DIRECTOR: PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON
US, 2014

Adapting a Thomas Pynchon novel for the screen is a task at which none have succeeded before Anderson, who sculpts a highly amusing, atmospheric screenplay out of Pynchon’s novel of the same name. Joaquin Phoenix returns for his second work with Anderson as Larry “Doc” Sportello, an incessantly pot-smoking private detective on the trail of several cases: keeping ex-girlfriend Shasta Fay Hepworth’s (Katherine Waterston) affair with a married man from exploding, hunting down a member of the Aryan Brotherhood with a debt to pay, and finding the missing, adrift Coy Harlingen (Owen Wilson). As all of these cases begin to intertwine, Doc comes in contact with a cadre of characters that could only populate the beaches and canyons of Los Angeles in the early 1970s—and could only come from a mingling of the eccentric imaginations of Pynchon and Anderson. (148 mins.)

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Sat, Sep 5, 2015
at 7 PM

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GOODFELLAS
DIRECTOR: MARTIN SCORSESE
US, 1990

Scorsese’s masterpiece of late-American Dream excess and the decaying effects of a ceaseless lust for money follows Henry Hill (Ray Liotta), a young man who idolizes the mobsters he sees in his neighborhood every day, as he works his way up the Brooklyn mafia hierarchy over a thirty-year period.  Perched above him in the pecking order is a ferocious trio: soft-spoken patriarch Paul Cicero (Paul Sorvino), the charismatic “Jimmy the Gent” (Robert DeNiro), and the terrifying, high-strung Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci). As we learn the deep inner workings of the Italian-American mafia through Hill’s experiences, longtime Scorsese cinematographer Michael Ballhaus’s camera incessantly roves, capturing every minute detail, while Thelma Schoonmaker’s crisp editing propels the story along at near-breakneck pace. (146 mins.)

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