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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
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Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Fri, Apr 3, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Apr 4, 2015
at 5 PM

Sun, Apr 5, 2015
at 3 PM

Sun, Apr 5, 2015
at 5 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
A YEAR IN CHAMPAGNE
DIRECTOR: DAVID KENNARD
US, 2014

Only sparkling wine produced within the boundaries of the Champagne region is truly “Champagne.” Wine importer Martine Saunier leads us on a tours of six Champagne makers to see how they make their product, from small independent producer Saint-Chamant to the illustrious houses of Gosset and Bollinger. Most Champagne is not just the product of a specific year. Signature house styles are creations that happen behind closed doors and in the miles of cellars beneath the countryside. Pull back the curtain and see how the people of a cold, tough land with a grim history of wars and conflict triumph in producing the drink of joy, seduction, and celebration. In Champagne, they don’t sell Appellations, they sell Brands, many of which have been famous for 200 years. (82 mins.)

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Fri, Apr 10, 2015
at 5:30 PM

OUT OF THE ARCHIVES: YOUTH-MADE FILMS FROM ACROSS OREGON
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS
PORTLAND

Since 1977, the Film Center's statewide Filmmakers-in-the-Schools Program has partnered with K-12 schools and community organizations around Oregon to bring the power of filmmaking to young people through artist residencies with Film Center faculty. Hundreds of youth-authored films have been made, many of them now a capsule in time. With support from a grant from the Oregon Heritage Commission and Oregon Parks & Recreation Department, 84 of these films have recently been rescued from the clutches of aging videotape stock by being digitized onto archival media. Drawing from those archives, this screening presents a vintage youth-eye view of how family and community define and reflect us and includes: KEEP OUR LAND FOR THE FUTURE (1991), about how young people are helping to shape the future of the rural community of Pine Creek, Oregon, created through an artist residency with Kristy Edmunds; THOUGHT I KNEW: FACING REALITY FROM THE INSIDE (1993), a call out from incarcerated teens in the MacLaren Correctional Facility in Salem, Oregon, about living a life of honesty, sobriety and personal responsibility, created with artist-in-residence Christopher Ley; and FRIENDS FIRST (1992), a Romeo and Juliet-inspired story of escape and recovery, created with Taft High School in Newport, Oregon, and artist-in-residence Sharon Genasci.

Free with admission to the Portland Art Museum, which is $5 after 5 PM on Fridays.


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Fri, Apr 10, 2015
at 7 PM

AN EVENING WITH COMMUNITY-BASED STORYTELLERS

Journalism and media work are no longer performed by journalists and media professionals alone. The public wants to create, contribute, and share news and information. Tonight, filmmakers Elaine McMillion (HOLLOW, an interactive documentary and community participatory project that examines the future of rural America through the eyes and voices of those living in McDowell County, West Va), Michael Premo (SANDY STORYLINES, stories of the ongoing recovery from Hurricane Sandy), Laura Lo Forti (NPMTC VANPORT MULTIMEDIA PROJECT, a participatory oral history initiative that captures and honors the stories of Vanport Flood survivors), and panel moderator Jigar Mehta (18 DAYS IN EGYPT, an interactive storytelling website documenting a year of revolution in Egypt) will describe their interactive projects and documentaries, which are indicative of how journalists and media makers are redefining storytelling to engage with communities. This screening and panel discussion is part of the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication’s “What is Journalism? Conference,” April 9-11. The public conference explores the past, present, and future of journalism as we move into the digital age.

Learn more about the "What is Journalism?" conference.


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Sat, Apr 11, 2015
at 2 PM

Sat, Apr 11, 2015
at 4 PM

Sat, Apr 11, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Apr 12, 2015
at 2 PM

Sun, Apr 12, 2015
at 4 PM

Sun, Apr 12, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
ON THE WAY TO SCHOOL
DIRECTOR: PASCAL PLISSON
FRANCE, 2014

Plisson’s César-winning documentary extols the true worth of getting, and getting to, an education. Shot in Kenya, Patagonia, Morocco, and the Bay of Bengal, the film follows the perilous journeys of four chil-dren on their ways to school: Jackson crosses the savannah on foot, avoiding elephants; Carlito rides on horseback across lonely plains and rushing rivers; Zahira treks over treacherous Atlas Mountain pass-es; and Samuel, in his antediluvian wheelchair, is pushed by his brothers over sand dunes and through swamps. While the breathtaking cinematography reveals the splendor of their homelands and the dan-gers of these voyages keep you on the edge of your seat, at the heart is the children’s resilience and their unstoppable yearning to learn and improve their lives. Suitable for ages 10+. (77 mins.)

Sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Oregon.


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Tue, Apr 14, 2015
at 7 PM

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Read Review
WATCHERS OF THE SKY
DIRECTOR: EDET BELZBERG
US, 2014

Interweaving four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, WATCHERS OF THE SKY uncovers the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin—the man who created the word “genocide” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize–winning book A Problem from Hell, Belzberg’s film embarks on a provocative journey from Nuremberg, Germany, to The Hague, Netherlands, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action. (120 mins.)

FREE ADMISSION

Co-presented with The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project at Portland State University. For more information on the project, please click here.

The purpose of The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project at Portland State University is to both provide support to the Portland Center for Public Humanities (PCPH) and their accompanying activities as well as engaging students, faculty, and the Portland community in the study of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide and mass atrocity. Furthermore, The Holocaust and Genocide Studies Project at PSU programming aims to highlight the local dimensions of the global impact of genocide through collaborations with local organizations that work with survivors of genocide.


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Thu, Apr 16, 2015
at 7 PM

Read Review
NWFC AND STUMPTOWN THEATER PRESENT: AMERICAN HOT WAX
DIRECTOR: FLOYD MUTRUX
US, 1978

“You get the idea that rock ‘n’ roll was born and all but killed off over one weekend in New York in 1959, and the compression of lived history makes this glorious film—with career performances by Tim McIntire as the doomed, all but death-seeking DJ Alan Freed and Larraine Newman as a Carole King-like songwriter—a fever dream in which anything can happen and almost everything does: a touching backstage harmony on ‘Hushabye’. Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis in their 1978 bodies appearing as themselves in the movie [set] almost twenty years earlier and making you believe every note and gesture. A doo-wop group throwing songs at each other on a street corner in a way you know will never translate to the stage. A flip from a bandleader, a wide-open mouth from a record producer, a slow, film-noir walk down a dark and rainy street—it all makes you feel as if the music and its moment was too good to be true. It was—but it happened. And it should have happened just like this.”—Greil Marcus. (91 mins.)

Co-presented by Stumptown Stages, whose production of “Soul Harmony: The Story of Deborah Chessler, Sonny Til and The Orioles” chronicles a key chapter in the formative years of rhythm & blues, runs April 16-May 3. Rock music critic Greil Marcus will introduce the film.


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Fri, Apr 17, 2015
at 7 PM

AN EVENING WITH KELLY SEARS

Kelly Sears’ experimental animation cuts up and collages imagery from American culture and politics to intervene with the history embedded in the frame. Working with appropriated images ranging from thrift store cast-offs to archival material, she uses animation to rebuild American histories that shift between the official and the uncanny while exploring contemporary narratives of power, including manifest destiny, occupation, and surveillance. This program contains films that address failure – of technology, of progress, and history—but this failure creates an opportunity to reexamine and envision other speculative narratives.

April 18, 10am-2pm: Sears will conduct a workshop “Bigfoot Re-interpreted: A Community Stop-Motion Animation Project” in which participants will learn the basics of 2D cut-out and collage stop motion animation filmmaking by setting up and operating a basic downshooting rig with Dragonframe software.

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Sat, Apr 18, 2015
at 2 PM

Sat, Apr 18, 2015
at 4 PM

Sat, Apr 18, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Apr 19, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Apr 19, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
BELLE AND SEBASTIAN
DIRECTOR: NICHOLAS VANIER
FRANCE, 2014

Set during World War II in the French Alps, BELLE AND SEBASTIAN is based on a beloved 1960s French TV series featuring resourceful young Sebastian and the giant mountain sheepdog he calls Belle. Sebastian is a lonely six-year-old boy who dreams of the day his mother will return from America—the place that his adoptive grandfather tells him she’s gone. He finds needed companionship with “the beast” that local farmers are convinced is killing their sheep—an enormous sheepdog that quickly proves anything but dangerous, instead becoming the boy’s best friend and protector. With Nazis rooting out the Resistance fighters helping Jewish refugees cross the border, Belle and Sebastian soon prove their courage. Suitable for ages 10+. (104 mins.)

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Fri, May 1, 2015
at 7 PM

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Read Review
NWFC AND CINEMA PACIFIC PRESENT: BALIKBAYAN #1
DIRECTOR: KIDLAT TAHIMIK
PHILIPPINES, 2015

VISITING ARTIST—The latest piece by acclaimed Filipino filmmaker Kidlat Tahimik (THE PERFUMED NIGHTMARE) was a filmic voyage spanning 35 years. Winner of the Caligari Prize at the 2015 Berlin International Film Festival, BALIKBAYAN #1 tells the story of Enrique, Magellan’s slave (arguably a Filipino) who inadvertently became the first person to ever circumnavigate the globe. “In the film, Enrique (played by the director himself) does not appear as the object of European exploitation, but rather as a kind of shrewd cosmopolitan from the Global South. Kidlat Tahimik began working on his film about Enrique in 1979, but for personal reasons never completed it. Not until more than three decades later has he now been able to finish it, almost without a budget—partly thanks to new developments in media technology (some of the new footage was shot with an iPhone).”—Tilman Baumgartel. “A sui generis historical epic, the film freely mixes genres, integrates a variety of formats and features a carousel of actors spanning three generations—it may very well be Tahimik’s magnum opus.”—Giovanni Marchini Camia, Filmmaker Magazine. (146 mins.)

Working title: MEMORIES OF OVER DEVELOPMENT (1979-2015)

Kidlat Tahimik will introduce the film. Co-presented with the Cinema Pacific Film Festival in Eugene, April 27-May 3, with support from the Consulate General of The Philippines in Portland.


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Sat, May 2, 2015
at 6 PM

Sun, May 3, 2015
at 2 PM

Sun, May 3, 2015
at 6 PM

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Read Review
HARD TO BE A GOD
DIRECTOR: ALEKSEI GERMAN
RUSSIA, 2013

Imagine an alien world—much like ours, except 1,000 years in the past—entrenched in a kind of alternate middle ages. This concept forms the core of German’s final film, a sci-fi mind-bender of epic proportions. Modern-day Russian scientists, led by Don Rumata (Leonid Yarmolnik) become marooned in the aforementioned world which is undergoing a purge of its intellectuals by its ruling class. Treated like gods but unable to tinker with the affairs of this mysterious place despite their “modern” perspective, Rumata and his colleagues seem helpless, forced to watch the alien land devour itself. Based on a novel by the acclaimed writers Boris & Arkadiy Strugatsky, German’s 15-years-in-the-making, posthumously-released fable is one of the dirtiest (in the sense of mud and grime) films ever made, but a true cinema experience like few others. “Pulses with intelligence, a mordant compassion, and yes, incredible wit.”—Glenn Kenny. (170 mins.)

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Mon, May 4, 2015
at 7 PM

Read Review
NWFC AND BRAVO YOUTH ORCHESTRAS PRESENT: CRESCENDO! THE POWER OF MUSIC
DIRECTOR: JAMIE BERNSTEIN
US, 2014

“El Sistema” was created 40 years ago in Venezuela to help foster social change by building youth orchestras among disadvantaged children. It has grown into a musical movement, counting among its graduates Gustavo Dudamel, the charismatic Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. CRESCENDO! THE POWER OF MUSIC follows students in two “Sistema”-inspired youth orchestra programs: “Play On, Philly!” in West Philadelphia; and the Harmony Program in Harlem, New York City. The film’s young musicians struggle against significant emotional and cultural roadblocks, sometimes set up by their own families. We meet Raven, a natural violinist whose rambunctiousness gets her in trouble (“Fortissimo, y’all!”); Zebadiah, an introspective boy who makes friends via the viola; and Mohammed, whose father insists he quit the trombone if he keeps failing classes. Music educators Stanford Thompson and Anne Fitzgibbon are heroes in these kids’ lives, helping them and countless others unlock their potential through the inspirational power of classical music. (85 mins.)

Co-sponsored by the BRAVO YOUTH ORCHESTRAS.


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