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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Essential Gus Van Sant (& His Influences)

Over the last three decades, Gus Van Sant has created an extraordinary body of film work. His first long-form films of the late 1980s and early 1990s, known as the “Portland Trilogy”, feature rebellious characters on the fringes of mainstream society who yearned to form new communities. The films became instant cult classics, earning Van Sant acknowledgment as one of the most talented and imaginative filmmakers of the indie film renaissance. Over the next decade, he directed a number of films that brought him critical and commercial success (the hugely popular GOOD WILL HUNTING and his bold remake of Hitchcock’s PSYCHO), before embarking on a re-evaluation of his artistic process and a return to his early indie roots. This later remarkable group of films features innovative visual style and groundbreaking sound explorations. Along with this survey of his films, we offer an exciting selection of works by filmmakers that have influenced the Van Sant’s film practice, including works by Stanley Kubrick, Werner Herzog, and Béla Tarr.—Mario Falsetto. 

Mario Falsetto, Professor Emeritus in Film Studies at Concordia University, Montreal, and author of the just published “Conversations with Gus Van Sant,” is teaching “Essential Gus Van Sant,” an eight-session non-credit course April 25—June 20. See School of Film for registration information.



Thu, Apr 23, 2015
at 7 PM

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MALA NOCHE
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 1985

Based on Portland poet Walt Curtis’ autobiographical novella, MALA NOCHE impressed both European and American critics and quickly established Van Sant as an important new voice in independent cinema. Set on the dark, rain-soaked streets of downtown Portland, Walt (Tim Streeter), a gay liquor store clerk, becomes obsessed with Johnny (Doug Cooeyate), a handsome young Mexican illegal immigrant who manipulates Walt’s lust for food and shelter but turns down his affections. Walt is forced to settle for Johnny’s friend Pepper and becomes his protector but can’t shake his fixation on the boy of his dreams. “A film of rare tenderness and longing, involving both humor and anguish.”— Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times. “Poetic, moody and impressionistic —the title is Spanish for ‘bad night’ —the fim is something to savor for the squalid world it introduces, and the way it presents its story, rather than for the specifics of that story.”—The Washington Post. (78 mins.)

WITH 

MY HUSTLER
US, 1965
DIRECTOR: ANDY WARHOL
Starring Warhol superstar Paul America as the titular hustler in his only feature film credit, this Fire Island-shot, loosely structured tale of an aging man searching for sexual satisfaction is one of Warhol’s least-known yet most curious films, made during a period of Warhol’s most intense creative flowering. (79 mins.)

Mario Falsetto will introduce the film and sign books.


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Sat, Apr 25, 2015
at 2 PM

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HEART OF GLASS
DIRECTOR: WERNER HERZOG
GERMANY, 1976

Herzog’s film, something of a curiosity in film history due to the fact that almost the entire cast performed while under hypnosis, tells the story of a small, 18th-century Bavarian village thrown into chaos after the death of its foremost resident—a glass blower and the lone holder of the secret recipe of the brilliant “ruby glass.” A local baron, owner of the glass factory where the master blower toiled, has been obsessed with the glass for some time, and soon the rest of the townsfolk pick up this fascination. However, all anyone can do is wander aimlessly, distraught and anxious following the loss of the secret recipe, until an outsider herdsman with prescient visions of the future appears in town one day. (94 mins.)

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Thu, Apr 30, 2015
at 7 PM

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DRUGSTORE COWBOY
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 1989

Van Sant’s acclaimed second feature is a daring and uncompromising look at outlaw junkie life based on the novel by James Fogle. Set in Portland in the early ‘70s, Matt Dillon gives the performance of his career as Bob Hughes, the superstitious leader of an awkward band of addicts who go directly to the source for drugs by robbing drugstores. Bob’s extended family includes his wife, Dianne (Kelly Lynch), the dim Rich (James LeGros) and his teenage girlfriend Nadine (Heather Graham). With a good dose of black humor, Van Sant follows the group’s escapades, which finally come undone when Nadine overdoses. Understanding that “Just Say No” doesn’t say anything to the drugged out, Van Sant neither romanticizes nor condemns drug use, but probes the addict’s psyche without giving way to moralistic overtures. “Compelling, unnerving and often darkly funny . . . Every minute is vital and alive.”—David Ansen, Newsweek. (100 mins.)

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Sat, May 2, 2015
at 2 PM

EARLY INFLUENCES
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS

This program presents a selection of experimental works from the 1960s, made by some of the foremost practitioners of the personal cinema style that reached its early peak during this period. Included in the program are: Robert Enrico’s INCIDENT AT OWL CREEK BRIDGE (1962), an award-winning adaptation of Ambrose Bierce’s Civil War story of a martial hanging gone awry; Arthur Lipsett’s VERY NICE, VERY NICE (1961), a rapid-fire, mid-20th-century slice-of-modern-life portrait; Bruce Conner’s A MOVIE (1958), an idiosyncratic, free-associative collage with—of course—movies as its target; Kenneth Anger’s SCORPIO RISING (1963), a legendary occult-biker mythological tale piercing the cult of male celebrity; Stan Brakhage’s SCENES FROM UNDER CHILDHOOD SECTION ONE (1967), the filmmaker’s vision of his children’s view of the world; and George Kuchar’s HOLD ME WHILE I’M NAKED (1966), one of Kuchar’s finest works, an exploration of sexual isolation with a twist. (117 mins.)

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Thu, May 7, 2015
at 7 PM

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MY OWN PRIVATE IDAHO
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 1991

Mike (River Phoenix) is a prostitute with narcolepsy—a handicap in any case, but especially when one’s profession involves letting your guard down in the presence of strangers. We see the world through Mike’s eyes, falling into slumber when he does, sharing the disjointed sense of time he feels and experiencing his confusion about where he is and how he got there. His only protector is his friend Scott (Keanu Reeves), another hustler, but one who is biding his time until his 21st birthday arrives and with it, a huge inheritance. They are an odd couple; Scott rejects his wealthy politician father, while Mike longs for the mother that abandoned him. The story’s parallels to “Henry IV” and the use of Elizabethan dialogue marks a high point in Van Sant’s examination of the hidden eloquence of the lives of the underprivileged on the streets of Portland. “Invigorating—written, directed, and acted with enormous insight and comic elan.”—Vincent Canby, The New York Times. (105 mins.)

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Sat, May 9, 2015
at 2 PM

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BURROUGHS: THE MOVIE
DIRECTOR: HOWARD BROOKNER
US, 1983

Brookner’s feature debut—which began as his senior thesis film at NYU with friends Jim Jarmusch and Tom DiCillo—is a devout, unflinching portrait of the late writer William S. Burroughs (1914-1997) shot and edited over several years in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Burroughs, at the time teaching at City College but once again addicted to heroin after temporarily kicking the habit, leads us through old haunts. Interviews with Allen Ginsberg, Patti Smith, Francis Bacon, and others also help peel back the layers of Burroughs’ persona for all to see. “Rarely is a documentary as well attuned to its subject.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times. (86 mins.)

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Thu, May 14, 2015
at 7 PM

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GERRY
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 2001

Filmed in the stunning deserts of northern Argentina, Utah, and Death Valley, GERRY falls into the category of minimalist road movie—trek movie, actually—as two friends (Casey Affleck and Matt Damon, both named Gerry) set off on foot in the wild in search of the elusive. Very soon they are com-pletely lost, disoriented, and in peril. Inspired by a real-life story and largely improvised on location, the film calls to mind Antonioni’s searching, existential meditations of the ‘60s, or perhaps the mystical visions of Andrei Tarkovsky or Béla Tarr. While the mystery of their destination challenges, the com-plexities of the journey provide a visually striking opportunity to think about where you might be going, the power of nature, the bonds of friendship and Van Sant’s continuing willingness to explore the possibilities of filmmaking. (103 mins)

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Sat, May 16, 2015
at 2 PM

Sun, May 17, 2015
at 7 PM

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WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES
DIRECTOR: BÉLA TARR
HUNGARY, 2000

During the Soviet era in a bleak and brutal unnamed town on the Hungarian plain, a mysterious circus arrives in the dead of night touting the appearance of the biggest whale in the world. Despite the fact that it’s only a carcass, in the following days people gather from miles around, slowly filling the dreary hamlet. János, a young, average citizen, along with his uncle György, a composer in the romantic vein, live a peaceful existence. However, the Prince, the faceless, magnetic authority behind the circus, has the power to incite riots and chaos—which, as the mob increases in size and fury, threatens the already tenuous existence of the small town and its inhabitants. Shot in glorious black and white, meticulously paced, lit, and edited, WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES remains one of contemporary cinema’s most influential works. (145 mins.)

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Thu, May 21, 2015
at 7 PM

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ELEPHANT
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 2003

Winner of the Palme d ‘Or and Best Director awards at the Cannes Film Festival, Van Sant drew inspiration for his key protagonists from the real-life Columbine High School tragedy. Rather than attempting to offer easy explanations, Van Sant creates a highly stylized evocation of a day in the life of a “normal” American high school, conveying a surface that in its very universality provides a telling portrait of an undercurrent of complexity and unease untied to specific events. Long, rhythmic takes and tracking shots subliminally map a topography in the viewer’s mind that is later revisited by the student killers. (81 mins.)

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Thu, May 21, 2015
at 8:45 PM

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ELEPHANT
DIRECTOR: ALAN CLARKE
UK, 1989

Via the depiction of a series of anonymous murders drawn from real police reports during the late 1980s, Clark offers a highly original, affecting look at the troubles in Northern Ireland. Conceived by Danny Boyle during his tenure at the BBC, Clarke’s film is especially noteworthy for its use of Steadicam 16mm in its view of the Northern Irish countryside gripped by fear, but also for its unflinching—and at the time highly controversial—view on the intense social issues on the forefront of the nation’s mind. (39 mins.)

FREE ADMISSION


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Sat, May 23, 2015
at 2 PM

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EYES WIDE SHUT
DIRECTOR: STANLEY KUBRICK
US, 1999

In the late 1990s, near the end of his career, Kubrick, known for his painstakingly crafted visions of Western culture— infused with a deep, unsettling malaise—enlisted Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise, at the time Hollywood’s hottest power couple, for a visceral exploration of marital un-fulfillment and existential dread. While at a lavish party, the couple is torn in different directions, both sexual and adulterous, which sets them off on a deeply disconcerting journey that will shake the foundations of their marriage. One of Kubrick’s most unjustly maligned films, and a passion project for which the director had long owned the adaptation rights—the film is based on Arthur Schnitzler’s 1926 novel TRAUMNOVELLE— EYES WIDE SHUT provides a dream-like, otherworldly vision of late 20th-century upper-crust marital politics. (159 mins.)

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Thu, May 28, 2015
at 7 PM

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LAST DAYS
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 2005

Michael Pitt portrays a hauntingly familiar figure in this meditation—dedicated to Kurt Cobain—on the final days in the life of a famed musician retreating from the clamor of the world and its myriad, insistent demands. “Success is subjective,” an earnest Yellow Pages salesman tells Blake (Pitt), as he invites him to consider how a directory listing may best serve his “business needs.” Blake, however, doesn’t need more calls and prefers to wander the grounds of his secluded estate, build himself a campfire and ironically sing “Home on the Range” to no one in particular. (97 mins.)

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Thu, Jun 4, 2015
at 7 PM

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THE TIMES OF HARVEY MILK
DIRECTOR: ROB EPSTEIN
US, 1984

Epstein’s landmark portrait of Harvey Milk (1930-1978), the first openly gay public-office-holder in United States history, retains its original power through the use of extensive archival footage that brings Milk’s singular, infectious charisma into clear view. Milk, a small business owner in San Francisco’s Castro district, ran for city office in an attempt to uphold community, rather than succumb to corporate interests. But upon election and brief service was, in late 1978, assassinated along with San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, by rival politician Dan White. Epstein covers Milk’s early life, political service, and the aftermath of his untimely death with aplomb, creating both a portrait of a fearless man and a city overcome with terrible grief over a senseless tragedy. Winner, Academy Award for Best Documentary. (90 mins.)

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Fri, Jun 5, 2015
at 7 PM

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MILK
DIRECTOR: GUS VAN SANT
US, 2008

Leading an all-star cast (Emile Hirsch, Josh Brolin, James Franco) in Van Sant’s intimate and meticulously researched new biographical drama, Sean Penn gives an astonishingly sensitive and astute performance as political iconoclast Harvey Milk, the self-described “Mayor of Castro Street.” “MILK tells Milk’s story as one of a transformed life, a victory for individual freedom over state persecution, and a political and social cause. . .[the film] never tries to show Milk as a hero, and never needs to. It shows him as an ordinary man, kind, funny, flawed, shrewd, idealistic, yearning for a better world.” (128 mins.)

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