Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Fri, Jan 2, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Jan 3, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Jan 4, 2015
at 4 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE SACRIFICE
DIRECTOR: ANDREI TARKOVSKY
SWEDEN/FRANCE, 1986

Andrei Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is generally considered to be the greatest director of post-war Soviet cinema and the last of the European Andrei Tarkovsky (1932-1986) is generally considered to be the greatest director of post-war Soviet cinema and the last of the European art-film generation. Full of deep spiritual and ecological concern and possessing an intensely poetic style, Tarkovsky infuses his vision into his films with uncompromising commitment. His final film, shot in Sweden with the help of Ingmar Bergman and made with the knowledge that he was dying of cancer, poses one last set of questions about morality, spirituality, and life’s meaning. The film follows 24 hours in the lives of seven friends who have gathered on an island for their host’s (Erland Josephson) birthday party. During dinner, the ground shakes and the news is announced that World War III has begun. In elegantly composed shots, we follow the man as he makes the difficult decision to sacrifice himself to God to prevent violence from touching the lives of his family. Both testament and epitaph, THE SACRIFICE’s mix of magic, madness, memory, and dream provides a fitting summary. Grand Jury Prize, Cannes Film Festival. (150 mins.)



^ Top

Fri, Jan 9, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Jan 10, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
NORTE, THE END OF HISTORY
DIRECTOR: LAV DIAZ
PHILIPPINES, 2013

Known as “a Filipino freedom fighter that choses cinema as his weapon, a rebolusyonario that shoots film instead of people,” Philippine New Wave director Lav Diaz’s gripping epic finds it’s inspiration in Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment as it reflects on the past century of rural life still overcoming its post-colonial experience. In the island province of Luzon, Fabian, an embittered young law-school dropout, commits a horrific double murder. Escaping justice, an innocent family man is convicted of the crime and sentenced to a life in prison that leaves his wife and children to fend for themselves. At once a meditation on cultural memory, class, personal and national guilt, the tyranny of ideology, and the reality of cosmic injustice, NORTE provides an immersion into a reality not soon forgotten. “Makes you wish it were twice as long.”—Time Out. (250 mins.)

This year’s Best Foreign Language Film Oscar submission from the Philippines.


^ Top

Sat, Jan 10, 2015
at 4:30 PM

SCHOOL OF FILM STUDENT SCREENING

Everyone is invited to watch the many short films created by students in the classes of Fall Term 2014. Whether the first attempt of a beginner or something more ambitious from an advanced student, it’s an uncurated, all-comers program for anyone who has decided they’re ready to show their work on the big screen. Join in congratulating them on this important step in their journey toward self-expression through film. (120 mins)

 

Free admission


^ Top

Sun, Jan 11, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE THANHOUSER STUDIO AND THE BIRTH OF AMERICAN CINEMA
DIRECTOR: NED THANHOUSER
US, 2014

The Thanhouser Company was a trail-blazing studio based in New Rochelle, New York, where from 1910 to 1917 it released over 1,000 films seen by audiences around the world. This documentary from Portlander Ned Thanhouser, grandson of studio founders Edwin and Gertrude, reconstructs the little-known story of the studio and its founders, technicians, and stars as they entered the nascent motion picture industry to compete with Thomas Edison and the companies aligned with his Motion Pictures Patents Corporation (MPPC). Recounting a saga of entrepreneurship, success and reversal, cinematic innovation, the launching of careers, and the transition of the movie industry from the East Coast to the West and Hollywood, Thanhouser’s film provides intriguing perspective on both the studio and the pioneering days of independent movie-making in America. (50 mins.)

Ned Thanhouser will introduce the film.


^ Top

Fri, Jan 16, 2015
at 7 PM

Sat, Jan 17, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Jan 18, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
ALTMAN
DIRECTOR: RON MANN
CANADA, 2014

Robert Altman (1925-2006) was, during his long filmmaking career, one of Hollywood’s mavericks—never concerned with popular tastes or prevailing trends. Despite this, he made some of the most enduring films of the 1970s and 80’s and was able to carve out a niche, resulting in a long, sometimes turbulent, wildly varied career. As Ron Mann’s documentary portrait shows, Altman influenced much of today’s American filmmaking landscape, with critics often deploying the term “Altmanesque” to describe films that hit a distinctly American nerve. Screens with three of Altman’s rarely screened early shorts: THE KATHRYN REED STORY (1965), POT AU FEU (1965), and THE PARTY (1965). (122 mins.)

^ Top

Sat, Jan 17, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE LONG GOODBYE
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US, 1973

As a tribute to, or perhaps in contempt of, the noir detective story, Altman subverts genre convention by re-imagining the usually hard-boiled character of Philip Marlowe as a nebbish private eye. Elliot Gould plays Marlowe, who digs himself deep into trouble when he decides to investigate the murder of a friend. Based on the book by Raymond Chandler with a screenplay by Altman and Leigh Brackett (THE BIG SLEEP), any vestiges of the tough-guy detective are purposefully sublimated by Gould’s unique characterization, making THE LONG GOODBYE one of Altman’s most interesting cinematic experiments. (112 mins.)

^ Top

Sun, Jan 18, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
3 WOMEN
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US, 1977

3 WOMEN is often under-appreciated among Altman’s films, yet it remains one of his most fascinating. Shelly Duvall was nominated for the Best Actress award at Cannes for her portrayal of Millie Lammoreaux, a happily, and perhaps purposefully, naïve young woman who meets the shy and introverted Pinky Rose, portrayed by Sissy Spacek. The two women become incidental friends at their mutual workplace and decide to live as roommates. When a desperate turn of events forces a reversal of roles between them, layers of identity and character are slowly peeled back, revealing delicate truths. (124 mins.)

^ Top

Wed, Jan 21, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
SILVER SCREEN CLUB MEMBERS PREVIEW: MR. TURNER
DIRECTOR: MIKE LEIGH
BRITAIN, 2014

“Timothy Spall won the Best Actor prize at Cannes for his magnificent performance as J.M.W. Turner in this gorgeously rendered biopic of the famed British landscape painter. Before Monet and Renoir, Pissarro and Sisley—in other words, before the French Impressionists—there was Turner, one of the greatest of all English painters. J.M.W. Turner was in love with light and what it could do to buildings and cities, to sea and ships, to mountains and countryside. Choosing to focus on the artist in middle age and deeply respectful of its subject whilst probing the darker recesses of the man’s personality, Leigh finds a strange, anti-social mumbler far more comfortable with canvas and paint than the social niceties demanded of the era.”—Toronto Film Festival. “A rich, funny, moving, and extremely clear-eyed film about art and its creation.”—New York Film Festival. (149 mins.)

Private screening for Silver Screen Club members and guests.


^ Top

Fri, Jan 23, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Jan 25, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
KIND HEARTS AND CORONETS
DIRECTOR: ROBERT HAMER
BRITAIN, 1949

“Murder, being a delicate matter, needs to be kept within the family. What surer cause for it is there than the kind of prolonged companionship that usually settles into a family relationship? It is all very well for such as André Gide to pose the thought of murdering a stranger in order to demonstrate the acte gratuit. But among people of taste and quality, the proprieties of murder—shall we say its art?—depend upon familiarity and intimacy. The artfulness of the film is to have all its victims, the D’Ascoynes family, played by one actor, Alec Guinness. This manages to add to the satire on family and nobility-such resemblance, but such eccentricity. Guinness also provides a model of that English acting which delights in pretense and regards distinct character as an illusion. The black humor, the iconoclasm and the going-in-drag are rooted in English history, but this film marks their special importance in the years since the war, and starts a movement that leads directly to Monty Python.”—David Thomson. (106 mins.)

Double feature with THE LAVENDER HILL MOB on Friday and THE LADY KILLERS on Sunday.


^ Top

Fri, Jan 23, 2015
at 9:15 PM

Mon, Jan 26, 2015
at 6:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE LAVENDER HILL MOB
DIRECTOR: CHARLES CHRICHTON
BRITAIN, 1951

With the aid of two bumbling sidekicks, timid bank clerk Henry Holland (Alec Guiness) nearly gets away with the heist of the century—a million pounds of gold bullion melted down into Eiffel Tower paperweights. But the plan goes awry when some schoolgirls mistake the gilt treasures as cheesy Parisian souvenirs. “As the prim, innocuous civil servant with a hidden spark of nonconformity. . .Guinness describes his gleaming-eyed, bowler-hatted little man as the ‘fubsy’ type, and he’s an image of Everyman. . .[P]robably the most nearly perfect fubsy comedy of all time. It’s a minor classic, a charmer. Stanley Holloway is the genteel, artistic accomplice. . .”—Pauline Kael. (81 mins.)

Double feature with KIND HEARTS AND CORONETS on Friday and THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT on Monday.


^ Top

Sat, Jan 24, 2015
at 2 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
PATHS OF GLORY
DIRECTOR: STANLEY KUBRICK
US, 1957

Kubrick’s classic tale of corrupted leadership and the farce of legal proceedings during wartime (WWI) strikes resonance today through its portrait of average soldiers who must pay the price for their superiors’ malfeasance. Led by Colonel Dax (Kirk Douglas in one of his finest roles as the moral compass of the film), the French 701st regiment has been ordered into a suicide mission, the intention of which is to attack a heavily fortified German position across a barren no-man’s-land. When this attack fails, leaving scores of soldiers dead or severely wounded, the ordering officers, Generals Broulard and Mireau (Adolphe Menjou and George Macready) try to cover their tracks and divert blame, eventually setting up a kangaroo court which will sentence their own men to death. (88 mins.)

The film will be introduced by Oregon State University Film Studies Professor Jon Lewis, followed by a discussion with Jon Lewis and OSU History Professor Christopher McKnight Nichols, as part of the OSU School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, and the School of Writing, Literature, and Film’s “Citizenship and Crisis: On the Centenary of WWI Initiative.”


^ Top

Sat, Jan 24, 2015
at 6:30 PM

Mon, Jan 26, 2015
at 8:30 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT
DIRECTOR: ALEXANDER MACKENDRICK
BRITAIN, 1951

In this light-hearted satire rich in comic twists, Alec Guiness plays a daffy inventor-chemist who concocts a miraculous fabric that will not soil, stain, or wear out. When the cloth industry discovers his revolutionary invention, he becomes a marked man. Mackendrick’s witty and original film takes on big business, labor, science, and consumer culture with equal glee before it comes to its “revealing” conclusion. (85 mins.)

Double feature with THE LADY KILLERS on Saturday and THE LAVENDER HILL MOB on Monday.


^ Top

Sat, Jan 24, 2015
at 8:45 PM

Sun, Jan 25, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE LADYKILLERS
DIRECTOR: ALEXANDER MACKENDRICK
BRITAIN, 1955

Mackendrick’s delightful black comedy finds Alec Guiness and his fumbling gang of crooks (Peter Sellers, Herbert Lom, and Cecil Parker) set up in a rented room to plan a robbery. The elderly homeowner becomes unwittingly involved and, try as they may to knock her off, they succeed instead to fall victim, one by one, to themselves. William Rose’s madly farcial script perfectly captures the essence of droll British humor. (95 mins.)

Double feature with THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT on Saturday and KIND HEARTS AND CORONETS on Sunday.


^ Top

Fri, Jan 30, 2015
at 6:30 PM

Fri, Jan 30, 2015
at 8:30 PM

Sat, Jan 31, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Sat, Jan 31, 2015
at 6:30 PM

Sat, Jan 31, 2015
at 8:30 PM

Sun, Feb 1, 2015
at 5 PM

Sun, Feb 1, 2015
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE KING AND THE MOCKINGBIRD
DIRECTOR: PAUL GRIMAULT
FRANCE, 1980

Widely considered one of the best animated features of all time and a masterpiece of French animation, the Prix Louis Delluc-winning THE KING AND THE MOCKINGBIRD has been cited by Studio Ghibli’s Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata as a profound influence on their work. The King is in love with a beautiful shepherdess in a painting on his wall, but she is in love with a chimneysweep from another artwork. At night the paintings come to life, and together they attempt to flee. Hiding at the top of the palace, they help Mr. Bird who’s become caught up in one of the King’s cruel traps, before leading the police on a wild chase. A story told with wit, charm, and imagination, with beautifully realized animation and rich with cultural references—Parisian and Venetian architecture, surrealist artists di Chirico and Magritte, METROPOLIS, KING KONG, and Tintin, among many—the result is a delightful marriage of story and image which animation lovers will recognize as the inspiration for Studio Ghibli. (83 mins.)

New digital restoration by Studio Canal.


^ Top


   
© 2009-2017 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development