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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
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2014
Volume 6
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2013
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Volume 4
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Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Italian Style

After World War II, Italian neo-realism emerged as the most appreciated cinema in the world. The great films of Luchino Visconti, Roberto Rossellini, and Vittorio De Sica turned eyes to Italy and set the stage for a new generation of filmmakers looking beyond the gloom and economic tragedy of the era and toward the issues and opportunities of modern industrialized society. The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool. Free admission for Portland Art Museum members—tickets for members available starting 30 minutes before the screening. Limited to the first 200 members on a first-come, first-served basis. Lines will form outside the Portland Art Museum’s Hoffman entrance.

 

Sponsored in part by the Istituto Italiano di Cultura.



Fri, Mar 6, 2015
at 7 PM

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LA DOLCE VITA
DIRECTOR: FEDERICO FELLINI
ITALY, 1960

Fellini’s emotional travelogue of the soul of modern Rome is a seductive meditation on what was truly meaningful (if anything) for the dusk-to-dawn Italian jet set of the era. Marcello Mastroianni was catapulted into superstar status in America as the sensitive (and Brioni-suited) tabloid reporter juggling the affections of several women (voluptuous movie star Anita Ekberg, icy mistress Anouk Aimée, and neurotic girlfriend Magali Noel) while making the rounds of the spirit-destroying nightlife of the Via Veneto. The film’s costumes–which won Piero Gherardi the Academy Award for Best Costume Design–portray a sophisticated, expensively dressed, and sensually alluring Mastroianni, an elegantly feline Aimée wearing black dresses and cat’s-eye sunglasses, and an impossibly glamorous Ekberg. “I feel that decadence is indispensable to rebirth.”—Fellini. (185 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 7, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 8, 2015
at 4:30 PM

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ROMAN HOLIDAY
DIRECTOR: WILLIAM WYLER
US, 1953

The first Hollywood film to be shot and produced on location in Italy, ROMAN HOLIDAY made Audrey Hepburn an enduring international star and fashion icon. Princess Ann (Hepburn), on a visit to Rome, decides to try to escape her stifling royal identity and head out to see the city incognito. She runs into American reporter Gregory Peck, and love blossoms as they discover the charms of the eternal city in a way that stimulated Italian tourism and fashion consciousness like no film before it. The winner of three Academy Awards for Best Screenplay (Ian McLellan Hunter, John Dighton), Best Actress (Audrey Hepburn), and Best Costume Design (Edith Head) in collaboration with the Fontana Sisters. (117 mins.)

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Sun, Mar 8, 2015
at 7 PM

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VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR
DIRECTOR: MATT TYRNAUER
US, 2008

Shot by Vanity Fair Correspondent Matt Tyrnauer between 2005 and 2007, VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR, offers an intimate and engaging, fly-on-the-wall insight into the personal and business life of one of Italy’s most famous fashion designers, Valentino Garavani. With unprecedented levels of access, we’re drawn into a rarified world of haute couture, glamour, and unabashed excess. Then in the twilight of his years, Valentino and his longtime partner, Giancarlo Giammetti, move regally between exotic locations and events worldwide as they prepare for Valentino’s final show. “At turns touchy and catty, a must-see for fashion-lovers and pop culture addicts alike.”—New York Times Magazine. (90 mins.)

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Fri, Mar 13, 2015
at 7 PM

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L'AVVENTURA
DIRECTOR: MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI
ITALY/FRANCE, 1960

Antonioni’s meditation on meaning in modern existence remains an obligatory experience in existential cinema-going. On a yachting trip off Sicily, a woman (Lea Massari) mysteriously disappears during an excursion on a desolate island. Her lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and her friend (Monica Vitti) begin a search, but during the fruitless quest, each slowly becomes enamored with the other and their guilt is soon replaced by passion. L’AVVENTURA is at once a mesmerizing mystery, a thought-provoking study of human behavior—the impermanence of romance, bourgeois boredom, and the ease with which we betray one another—an experiment in the expressive use of landscape, costume, and architecture, and an allegory on the troubled state of postwar Italy. Adriana Berselli’s costumes introduced a modern, understated Italian glamour, blending with the landscape as a key element to understanding the characters and their purposeless lives. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Cannes. (143 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 14, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 15, 2015
at 4 PM

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JULIET OF THE SPIRITS
DIRECTOR: FEDERICO FELLINI
ITALY, 1965

The female counterpoint to 8½, Fellini ventures deeply into the surreal as JULIET OF THE SPIRITS explores the repressed desires of a bourgeois housewife, played by Giulietta Masina who stars as a middle-aged woman haunted by hallucinations from her past and subconscious. While her husband philanders, she consults clairvoyants and mediums and escapes into a world of imagination drawn from the “spirits” of her past, present, and future. In an effort to prevent her world from crumbling, she confronts the specters and fantasies that have imprisoned her throughout her life. A lavish and baroque visual spectacle, JULIET boasts Gianni de Venanzo’s brilliant cinematography, a memorable score by Nino Rota, and the opulent fashion designs of Piero Gheradi, who won Oscars for Best Costume Design for LA DOLCE VITA and 8½. Winner of the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Picture. (148 mins.)

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Sun, Mar 15, 2015
at 7 PM

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SUMMERTIME
DIRECTOR: DAVID LEAN
UK, 1955

Jane (Katharine Hepburn), a lonely American spinster on vacation in Venice and hoping to find romance, succumbs to a passionate, bittersweet affair with Renato (Rossano Brazzi), a married Italian antique dealer. A visually enchanting valentine to the glories of the city as well as an endearing love story, Jane’s transformation from gloom to joy is echoed in an evolving wardrobe designed by Rosi Gori. A key item is a certain pair of red mules designed by Pompei in 1955 and reproduced in more recent years by Giuseppe Zanotti. “The film had an enormous effect on tourism. I remember the head of a hotel chain coming up to me and saying, ‘We ought to put a monument up to you.’”—David Lean. (102 mins.)

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Fri, Mar 20, 2015
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 22, 2015
at 4 PM

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BAREFOOT CONTESSA
DIRECTOR: JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ
US, 1954

Humphrey Bogart plays Harry Dawes, a recovering alcoholic film director who plucks simple nightclub dancer Maria Vargas (Ava Gardner) out of obscurity and turns her into an international movie star. The influential Roman fashion designers the Fontana Sisters created Gardner’s costumes, including the iconic and controversial “pretino” (based on a priest’s cassock and complete with a giant rosary), which was later referenced by Piero Gherardi for Anita Ekberg’s enticing costume in Fellini’s LA DOLCE VITA. “Mankiewicz’s pitiless take on the dissolute, dispiriting world of international filmmaking, a veritable film à clef...the film’s aura of profound and limitless disenchantment looks ahead to Fellini and Godard’s CONTEMPT.”—Film Society of Lincoln Center. (130 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 21, 2015
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Mar 22, 2015
at 7 PM

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LE AMICHE
DIRECTOR: MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI
ITALY, 1955

In LE AMICHE (Italian for girlfriends), a young woman returns to her hometown of Turin after World War II to set up a fashion salon. The film’s costumes were designed by Zoe, Micol, and Giovanna Fontana, sisters who opened their Rome atelier in 1943 and whose signature costuming in mid-century films gave Rome the nickname “Hollywood on the Tiber.” Here, the costumes create an impeccably elegant world, from work to the beach. Meanwhile, Antonioni’s cinematic style builds an atmosphere of longing and sympathy as the women balance new roles of life and work. Starring Eleonora Rossi Drago, Gabriele Ferzetti, and Franco Fabrizi. (104 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 21, 2015
at 7 PM

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IL SORPASSO
DIRECTOR: DINO RISI
ITALY, 1962

Classically mismatched co-stars Vittorio Gassman and Jean-Louis Trintignant embark on a wildly reckless ride in an iconic Lancia Aurelia convertible from Rome to rural southern Italy. An inspiration to American road movies from EASY RIDER to SIDEWAYS, Risi’s commedia all’italiana reads as a sort of elegy on the unfettered energies of the early 1960s—fast cars, jazz, rock ’n’ roll, and cool fashion sense. “IL SORPASSo uses its journey to reveal a whole culture. . .a brilliant snapshot of the boom years when poor, war-ravaged Italy suddenly became a go-go nation where the economy boomed, people bought cars, and everyone wanted to have fun.”—John Powers. (105 mins.)

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