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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
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2014
Volume 6
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2012
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2011
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2010
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Volume 1

2009
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2008
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2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
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Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
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2005
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2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
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2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
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Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
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Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
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Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
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1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Special Screenings


Fri, Oct 31, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Nov 1, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
JE T’AIME JE T’AIME
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS
FRANCE, 1968

Suffering from its canceled premiere at the 1968 Cannes Film Festival and only arriving in the US two years later to little fanfare, Resnais’ mid-career foray into science fiction developed somewhat of a cult following, but has remained largely unseen. Following Claude (Claude Rich), an average man who is enlisted in a speculative scientific experiment in which he will be able to travel through time into his personal past, Resnais’ film evokes a sanguine, yet familiar, version of a near future in which personal memory plays a vital role in our lives—contrary to other, more cynically dystopian visions. “In time, as it were, those [temporal] leaps add up to a cubistic portrait of a not especially remarkable man who becomes something more, not because of his commonplace life but because of the extraordinary manner in which his story emerges in its sweep and details, its simplicity and grandeur.”—Manohla Dargis, The New York Times. (94 mins.)

Newly struck 35mm print courtesy of the Film Desk and Bleeding Light Film Group.


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Tue, Nov 4, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
FROM NOTHING, SOMETHING
DIRECTOR: TIM CAWLEY
US, 2012

Profiling creative thinkers across several disparate disciplines, Cawley forges a portrait of the creative mind and the various ways we come to make something, whether functional, beautiful, or both. Finding similarities among creatives like Maria Bamford (comedy), Preston Scott Cohen (architecture), Jason Rohrer (video games), and Keith Young (choreography), among many others, FROM NOTHING, SOMETHING is an intimate, loving, and often humorous view into some of the most inventive minds working today. (79 mins.)

Director Tim Cawley will appear via Skype. Co-presented with Design Museum Portland. Special ticket pricing: $10 adult; $7 student/senior/PAM member.


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Sun, Nov 16, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
RAGING BULL
DIRECTOR: MARTIN SCORSESE
US, 1980

SHAWN LEVY BOOK SIGNING & FILM—Join us tonight as Portland film critic and author Shawn Levy (Rat Pack Confidential, King of Comedy: The Life and Art of Jerry Lewis) introduces Martin Scorsese's RAGING BULL and discusses his latest book, De Niro: A Life.

“The apotheosis of De Niro's -- indeed, of anyone's -- practice of Method Acting comes in Martin Scorsese's harrowing biopic about the boxer Jake LaMotta.  De Niro sculpted his body to a middleweight fighter's level of fitness, then ballooned up by adding 60 pounds to his frame so as to depict the washed-up LaMotta.  Even more astonishing, it could be argued, is his emotional commitment to the role:  playing an unsavory character with immense, unfailing empathy and brutal poetry.  A titanic performance and a great, great film.”—Shawn Levy. (129 mins.)

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Tue, Nov 18, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
KANO
DIRECTOR: UMIN BOYA
TAIWAN, 2014

For every young baseball player in Japan, reaching Koshien, the Japanese High School Baseball Championship, is the ultimate dream. In the 1930s, when Taiwan was a Japanese colony, Koshien was also the dream of the hapless, multi-ethnic high school baseball team from rural Chiayi known as KANO, short for Kagi Agricultural and Forestry School. When a new coach reluctantly takes over, he turns the team and their entire town into believers that this winless team can reach a place they never thought possible. A true underdog sports story of living the dream, KANO was the winner of the Audience Award at both the 2014 Taipei and Osaka Asian Film Festivals. “Reps a landmark feat in the way it revisits Taiwan’s long-suppressed colonial past with great authenticity and resplendent style.”—Variety. (185 mins.)

Director Umin Boya in attendance. Co-presented with the Taiwanese Association of Greater Portland.


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Wed, Dec 10, 2014
at 5:30 PM

2014 PROJECT VIEWFINDER SCREENING
PORTLAND, 2014

Homelessness is, and is not, what you think. This series of poignant short films, created by local young adults transitioning from struggle to hope and self-sufficiency, uses personal experience to reveal some of the causes and possible solutions to this important problem in our community. The youth are participants in the School of Film's Project Viewfinder, now in its second year, which partners with area community organizations to teach the tools of filmmaking to disadvantaged populations. Join us for this uplifting testimony to the power of filmmaking to change young lives, and for film to spark a collective sense of community compassion. Thanks to New Avenues for Youth, Outside In, p:ear, SMYRC, BCCTV and the Wheeler Foundation for helping to make this project possible. (100 mins.)

FREE ADMISSION

The young filmmakers and their faculty mentors will be present to interact with the audience. A post-film reception for the young filmmakers immediately follows in the adjacent Andrée Stevens Room.


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Wed, Dec 17, 2014
at 7 PM

Thu, Dec 18, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Dec 20, 2014
at 4 PM

Sat, Dec 20, 2014
at 6 PM

Sun, Dec 21, 2014
at 5 PM

2014 BRITISH ARROW AWARDS
GREAT BRITAIN, 2014

This annual juried survey (37th edition), formerly called the British Television Advertising Awards, never fails to deliver an entertaining mix of commercial creativity of the highest order. Drawn from submissions across the UK’s multimedia advertising platforms—from traditional broadcast and cinema to new online mediums—trademark British wit and gleeful innovation shine through. Whether touching drama or high-tech dazzle, low-budget invention or mind-boggling production, this eclectic collection of prizewinners does have something in common: they are all delightfully short and inspired. Thanks to the British Arrows, London, for this creative crash course on the marriage of advertising and film, art and commerce. (74 mins.)

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Fri, Dec 19, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Dec 20, 2014
at 8 PM

Sun, Dec 21, 2014
at 2:30 PM

Sun, Dec 21, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
LEVEL FIVE
DIRECTOR: CHRIS MARKER
FRANCE, 1997

French film essayist Chris Marker (LA JETEE, A GRIN WITHOUT A CAT, LE JOLI MAI) singular place in cinema is distinguished by a constant probing of how he, and we, come to experience time, memory, history and cinema itself. Unreleased in the United States until now, Marker’s film presciently uses cyber-space to explore a chapter in wartime Japan. Laura “inherits” a task: to finish writing a video game centered on the Battle of Okinawa—whose development played a decisive role in the way World War II ended. The game is strange one, in fact. Contrary to classical strategy games whose purpose is to turn back the tide of history, this one seems willing only to reproduce history as it happened. While working on Okinawa and meeting, through a rather unusual network (a parallel to the Internet), various informants and even eye-witnesses to the battle (including film director Nagisa Oshima), Laura gathers pieces of the tragedy until they start to interfere with her own life. Melding retro-futuristic sci-fi imagery, references to American film noir, and reflections on history, Marker crafts a visually and philosophically provocative puzzle. “A passionate and cerebral science-fiction adventure...there is nothing else in theaters now that feels quite as new.” —The New York Times. (106 mins.)

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Fri, Dec 26, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Dec 27, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Dec 28, 2014
at 4 PM

Sun, Dec 28, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
STRAY DOGS
DIRECTOR: TSAI MING-LIANG
TAIWAN/FRANCE, 2013

In Ming-Liang’s vision, existence seems to hang by a thread that could snap at any moment. Under a torrential downpour in Taipei, a single father does odd jobs to make a meager living. His children, left without supervision, roam the streets. Their divorced mother spends her nights creeping around like a ghost in her rundown building and feeding the stray dogs that take shelter there. With his latest offering, the Taiwanese filmmaker delves deeper into his evocative cinematic world, one where disenfranchised people are overcome with uneasiness they can’t explain. With its gorgeous lighting and striking locations and compositions, STRAY DOGS is “as visually powerful as it is emotionally overwhelming and bracingly pure in both its anger and its compassion. One of the finest works of an extraordinary artist.”—New York Film Festival. “Imbued with mystery, sly humor, and an enormous heart.”—Toronto Film Festival. Grand Jury Prize, Venice Film Festival. (138 mins.)

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