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VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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World War I on Film

2014 marks the centennial of the beginning of “the great war,” World War I. With events being held in memoriam worldwide, and with conflicts still raging whose histories connect to that epic clash, we look back—through four landmark films—at the wake of the 20th century’s first major cataclysm. Each of the films is a masterpiece in its own right, innovative and idiosyncratic in not only its aesthetic and narrative techniques, but also its views on the struggle between nations. From studio productions to independents, silent to sound, these four films are emblematic representations of not only the major shifts of the worldwide film industry over a 30-year period, but also of the ways in which filmmakers put the seemingly untranslatable experience of war in front of those who needed to see it most: the average citizens who comprised, or were related to, those who served.

Presented in conjunction with the Portland Art Museum’s exhibition This is War! Graphic Arts from the Great War, 1914-1918, running through December 14, 2014.



Wed, Nov 19, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Nov 22, 2014
at 4:15 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE GRAND ILLUSION
DIRECTOR: JEAN RENOIR
FRANCE, 1937

Renoir’s masterpiece of understanding across enemy lines—produced during the dark period leading up to WWII—follows soldiers and officers, both working-class and aristocratic, through their journeys during the great war. After French Captain De Boeldieu (Pierre Fresnay) and Lieutenant Maréchal (Jean Gabin) are shot down over enemy lines by German Captain von Rauffenstein (Erich von Stroheim), a narrative is set in motion that takes the three men to several prison camps (including a mountain castle) and finally, for one of them, the grave. While Boeldieu and von Rauffenstein share aristocratic roots that stretch across borders, Maréchal has more in common with a group of rag-tag French POWs into whose ranks he and Boeldieu are thrust. The fates of the three men take vastly different routes, and in between, Renoir unambiguously highlights the intimacies the POWs share both while in captivity and on the run, focusing on their humanity over all else. (114 mins.)

New 35mm print courtesy of Rialto Pictures.


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Thu, Nov 20, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Nov 23, 2014
at 7 PM

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Read Review
ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT
DIRECTOR: LEWIS MILESTONE
US, 1930

Adapting Erich Maria Remarque’s classic novel of the atrocities of war for Universal, Lewis Milestone produced one of the studio’s most expensive, sweeping films—one that resonated deeply with a public still dealing with the aftermath of the great war and mired in severe economic depression. A group of German boys—who we first see, impressionable and naïve, at secondary school—are compelled to join the army “for the Fatherland,” following an impassioned speech by their headmaster. Paul (Lew Ayres), the moral center of the group, and the others are then sent through the various levels of hell in this searing tale of wartime horrors and their post-war repercussions, which has deep resonance today with its strong anti-war, pro-human message. (136 mins.)

35mm sync-silent preservation print with score, courtesy of the Library of Congress.


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Fri, Nov 21, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
THE BIG PARADE
DIRECTOR: KING VIDOR
US, 1925

MGM’s largest and most famous production at the time, and one of the highest grossing silent films, King Vidor’s epic follows Jim (John Gilbert, in perhaps his most famous role), a rich, spoiled young man threatened with expulsion from the family home if he fails to enlist for the army on the eve of WWI. Spurred on by his patriotic friends, instead, Jim heads to Europe where he quickly falls in love with a beautiful farm girl, Melisande (Renée Adorée). Love is fleeting, however, as Jim is whisked away to the front and stands face-to-face with his own mortality. Vidor subtly transitions from the ecstasy of love to the barbarity of battle in this exquisitely rendered vision of life’s cruel polarities. (133 mins.)

35mm preservation print with score, courtesy of the Library of Congress.


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Sat, Nov 22, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
PATHS OF GLORY
DIRECTOR: STANLEY KUBRICK
US, 1957

Kubrick’s classic tale of corrupted leadership and the farce of legal proceedings during wartime strikes resonance today through its portrait of average soldiers who must pay the price for their superiors’ malfeasance. Led by Colonel Dax (Kirk Douglas in possibly his finest role as the moral compass of the film), the French 701st regiment has been ordered into a suicide mission, the intention of which is to attack a heavily fortified German position across a barren no-man’s-land. When this attack fails, leaving scores of soldiers dead or severely wounded, the ordering officers, Generals Broulard and Mireau (Adolphe Menjou and George Macready) try to cover their tracks and divert blame, eventually setting up a kanagaroo court which will sentence their own men to death. (88 mins.)

Newly restored in 2k digital by Park Circus.


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