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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2012
Volume 6
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Volume 1

2010
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Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
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Volume 3
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Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
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2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
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Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
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Volume 1

2005
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Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
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Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
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Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
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Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
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Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
March/April 2007
Thu, Mar 8, 2007 - Sun, Apr 29, 2007

One of the great directors to emerge during the French New Wave, Jacques Rivette's films have remained largely unseen by American audiences. One of the quintent of famed "Cahiers du Cinéma" critics-turned-filmmakers (which also include Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol), Rivette has focused on women-not just on female protagonists, but on the lives of women removed from men-At the same time exploring themes of theatricality, performance, the cinematic process, illusion and reality. his playful, cerebral and sometimes extended ruminations have always pushed the boundaries of conventional art house cinema and thus, despite critical accolades, eluded the wider commercial distribution of his contemporaries.

Perhaps best known in the U.S. for his 'Alice in Wonderland' styled fable CELINE AND JULIE GO BOATING (1974), in which a magic sweet takes two protagonists (Dominique Labourier and Juliet Berto) to the heart of a strange drama, Rivette, now 78, has said "I like film to be an adventure for those who make it and for those who see it." In works that range from THE NUN (1965), which chronicles the life of Suzanne Simonin (Anna Karina), a 17th century woman forced by her parents to enter a convent; JOAN THE MAID (1994) in which Sandrine Bonnaire gives an achingly complex performance as Joan of Arc, to SECRET DEFENSE (1998), a contemporary revenge murder-thriller also starring Sandrine Bonnaire, to his Cannes prize winning LA BELLE NOISEUSE (1991), an incisive exploration of the artistic process adapted from Honoré de Balzac's novella "The Unknown Masterpiece," Rivette has shown a remarkable ability across the decades to reinvent himself, even as his films remain unmistakably his own.

This retrospective was organized and made possible with the assistance of David Schwartz and Livia Bloom of the Museum of the Moving Image, New York; the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York; the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Paris and the National Film Theatre, London.

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How did they get so bad? Some have secrets, some want revenge and some are just damn tired of their husbands. If pulling the trigger is unladylike, getting some sucker to do the deed is no problem. The vintage femme fatales in these classics from the golden age of noir - indelible in their 35mm glory-will take you back to nights of dark intrigue and cold bargains by women who mean business.

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