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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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Special Screenings


Fri, Oct 3, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Oct 4, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
MANAKAMANA
DIRECTOR: STEPHANIE SPRAY, PACHO VELEZ
NEPAL/US, 2013

“Spray and Velez’s (literally) transporting film—shot inside a cable car that carries pilgrims and tourists to and from a mountaintop temple in Nepal—is radically simple in conception. Each of its shots lasts as long as a one-way ride, which corresponds to the duration of a roll of 16mm film. This newest work from Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab—which previously produced SWEETGRASS and LEVIATHAN—is thrillingly mysterious in its effects: a staged documentary, a cross between science fiction and ethnography, an airborne version of an Andy Warhol screen test. As with the richest structural films, MANAKAMANA is a kind of head movie that viewers are invited to complete as they watch. An endlessly suggestive film that both describes and transcends the bounds of time and space.”—New York Film Festival. “The must-see cinematic experience of the year.” –Indiewire. (118 mins.)

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Sun, Oct 5, 2014
at 2 PM

Mon, Oct 6, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
LEVITATED MASS
DIRECTOR: DOUG PRAY
US, 2013

LEVITATED MASS chronicles the journey of a 340-ton granite boulder that was moved from a quarry in Riverside, Calif., to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and mounted upon the walls of a 456-foot-long concrete slot. First attempted in 1968, the 2012 permanent installation Levitated Mass is the latest land sculpture by one of America’s most misunderstood and exciting artists, Michael Heizer. His rock’s 105-mile transport captured international media attention and challenged the imagination of thousands of southern Californians over 10 nights as it crawled through four counties on a football-field-long transport. As fascinating is the dramatic story of Heizer’s past and present work, the ambitions of a major metropolitan museum, and the public’s reaction to this massive display of modern (yet ancient-feeling) conceptual art. (88 mins.)

Director Doug Pray in attendance at the Sunday screening.

Presented in association with Design Week Portland, October 4-11, 2014.


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Fri, Oct 17, 2014
at 7 PM

HOME MOVIES IN FILMMAKERS' HANDS
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS
US

This program of short films celebrates how Northwest filmmakers are paying homage to home movies either through drawing inspiration from the medium or by re-purposing home movie found footage with artistic intent and success. 

JUNIOR by GUS VAN SANT, an intimate afternoon at home with the filmmaker and his cat; MONUMENT by PATTI SAKURAI, footage from the filmmaker's family road trip to Mount Rushmore reflects on their lives and their place in the American landscape; A MOVING FAMILY STORY by NOAH STANIK, a true story, brought to life with extensive home movie footage, of a family that moves to Seattle in the 1970s in a last-ditch effort to save a marriage that was probably doomed to begin with; MEMORY LAPSE by SCOTT AMOS, who says, "I collect other people's memories from garage sales, estate auctionsand garage heaps. My basement is full of them.  I wonder what they'd think if they knew what I did with their memories."; THE BURDEN by ANDY BLUBAUGH, a deeply personal essay exploring the under appreciated family role of documentarian and the image as family artifact; MIXTAPE GHOSTS IN MY HEADPHONES by BRIAN VANDIVER, a touching, unedited tape recording created as a family letter years ago accompanies excerpts of the filmmaker's family's home movies; ENTERING THE ATMOSPHERE by BRIAN LIBBY, the filmmakers' home movies combine with astronomic images to compare the concepts of birth and arrival; 50 YEARS LATER by MATT MCCORMICK, the filmmaker retraces the steps of a family road trip that his father documented in a home movie; FOUND FOOTAGE by CLANCY DENNEHY, in film footage 'found inside a Super 8 camera at a garage sale," a woman and a baby take a road trip into the old growth. (70 mins.)

Screens at the Northwest Film Center's School of Film, 934 SW Salmon Street.


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Sat, Oct 18, 2014
at 1 PM

HOME MOVIE DAY 2014

The Film Center and Oregon Historical Society are excited to celebrate treasures lost and found at the worldwide Home Movie Day. Pull out your home movies—8mm, Super 8mm and 16mm film (no video please!)—and share them on the big screen with fellow film enthusiasts. We’ll also show films from the Moving Image Collections of the Historical Society and Film Center. Learn how best to care for your films, enjoy some tasty treats and play Home Movie Day Bingo, too. For more information, visit homemoviedaypdx.tumblr.com.

1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

FREE ADMISSION.


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Mon, Oct 27, 2014
at 7 PM

CINEMA PROJECT AND NWFC PRESENT (UN) FIXED TERRA FIRMA: ANALOG FILMS FROM ARTIST-RUN LABS (I)

Celluloid-based filmmaking is alive and well in Europe, thanks to a network of film labs dedicated to both the preservation of technology and cinematic experimentation. This two-night program features work from three artist-run cooperatives: L’Abominable in La Courneuve, France; Labor Berlin in Berlin, Germany; and Labo Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium. While the artists associated with these labs produce work in a variety of styles, the films selected for these two evenings are similar in demonstrating extremes of the photographic process.

Monday night's films:

PARTIES VISIBLE ET INVISIBLE D’UN ENSEMBLE SOUS TENSION
FRANCE 2009
DIRECTOR: EMMANUEL LEFRANT
In these landscapes in fusion, it’s the logic of a world that reveals itself. A bipolar world, where invisible takes shape with the visible, where the first dissolves itself into the second and vice versa. (7 mins.— L’Abominable)
 
TAHOUSSE
FRANCE 2006
DIRECTORS: OLIVIER FOUCHARD, MAHINE ROUHI
“In the Alps, in Kurdistan, in Tchecheny... It all begins with a blue tree – BLACK – Then, clouds raking the earth of a lost valley – swirling clouds at the speed of terror – BLACK – images returning from beyond the war volcanoes.”—Light Cone (31 mins.—L’Abominable)
 
H(i)J
GERMANY 2009
DIRECTOR: GUILLAUME CAILLEAU
A hand-processed film that is extremely rich in contrast. More than with standard black–and–white material, the black and white here seem to lead their own lives, conquering the entire film frame in turns. (6 mins.—Labor Berlin)
 
DIDAM
FRANCE 2000
DIRECTOR: MAHINE ROUHI, OLIVIER FOUCHARD
“Rouhi and Fouchard set their cameras in grandiose virgin landscapes and edit their film to the rolling of thunder or the shadow of a cloud passing. The intense work on the film medium (colors, contrasts, negatives) reinstates nature as piercingly primeval.” —Emeric de Lastens (11 mins.—L’Abominable)
 

Co-presented by Cinema Project and Northwest Film Center.


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Tue, Oct 28, 2014
at 7 PM

CINEMA PROJECT AND NWFC PRESENT (UN) FIXED TERRA FIRMA: ANALOG FILMS FROM ARTIST-RUN LABS (II)

Celluloid-based filmmaking is alive and well in Europe, thanks to a network of film labs dedicated to both the preservation of technology and cinematic experimentation. This two-night program features work from three artist-run cooperatives: L’Abominable in La Courneuve, France; Labor Berlin in Berlin, Germany; and Labo Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium. While the artists associated with these labs produce work in a variety of styles, the films selected for these two evenings are similar in demonstrating extremes of the photographic process.

Tuesday night's film:

GRADUAL SPEED
BELGIUM 2013
DIRECTOR: ELS VAN RIEL
In Els van Riel’s GRADUAL SPEED, the image in each vignette appears through time much like a photograph developing while the hum and crackle of vibrating dust erupts on the optical track. (52 mins.– Labo Bruxelles)

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