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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
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Volume 5
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2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
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Volume 6
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Volume 4
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Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

This retrospective of modern Polish Cinema features works produced from the 1950s through the 1980s—an era marked by a loosening of political strictures and striking personal expression. The series is curated by Martin Scorsese and organized by his non-profit Film Foundation along with Milestone Films. Each film in the program has been digitally remastered and newly subtitled. Circulation of the program has been made possible with the assistance of the Propaganda Foundation, DI Factory, CRF, Kino RP, Tor, Zebra, and Kadr, with the support of the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage of the Republic of Poland, the Polish Film Institute, and the Polish National Audiovisual Institute. Special thanks to the Polish Library Association, Portland, for their support for our presentation.



Fri, Sep 26, 2014
at 7 PM

Read Review
CAMOUFLAGE
DIRECTOR: KRZYSZTOF ZANUSSI
POLAND, 1977

Versed in philosophy and physics, renowned writer-director Krzysztof Zanussi injects wit and humor into his acerbic portrait of conformity. In this ironical and absurd comedy set at a provincial university summer school camp, the shallowness and cynicism of the academic milieu becomes apparent through the relationship between a young linguistics professor, Jaroslaw, and his diabolical senior colleague, Jakub. “All people are conformists just like you and I,” exclaims the latter, protesting against the liberal teaching approach of Jaroslaw. The film won three top awards at the Polish Film Festival in Gdynia, even as it was summarily banned by the Polish government. However, it did go on to become the country’s official Oscar® submission in the Foreign Language Film category. (106 mins.)

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Sat, Sep 27, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE SARAGOSSA MANUSCRIPT
DIRECTOR: WOJCIECH HAS
POLAND, 1965

In Spain during the Napoleonic Wars, two enemy officers form an uneasy truce at a deserted Saragossa inn as they pore over a mysterious book recounting the amazing tales of Alphonse van Worden (Zbigniew Cybulski), a Walloon officer who came to Spain in 1739. A multitude of stories flows from the fantastical tome, variously including two Moorish princesses with their sights set on van Worden, a Cabalist, a sultan and a band of gypsies; raconteurs all, they in turn relate evermore ancient stories to van Worden about forbidden love, ghosts and magic. Championed by Luis Buñuel, the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia and Francis Ford Coppola, this film is a mind-blowing cinematic experience. (182 mins.)

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Sun, Sep 28, 2014
at 4:45 PM

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TO KILL THIS LOVE
DIRECTOR: JANUSZ MORGENSTERN
POLAND, 1972

What was it like to be young at the turn of the 1970s in Communist Poland? While Neil Armstrong lands on the moon, Magda and Andrzej discover love and life in a big city. They didn’t get into the university—quotas are restricted mainly to working-class families. They are young and ambitious, dream of independence, and have no means of reaching their goals without entering the mean, conformist reality surrounding them. Does the end justify the means? A love story set against the harsh backdrop of the Communist regime. (92 mins.)

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Sun, Sep 28, 2014
at 7 PM

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ASHES AND DIAMONDS
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND, 1958

Wajda’s early masterpiece is set on the last day of World War II and the first day of peace—and between them, a night that changes everything. In the eyes of Maciek (Zbigniew Cybulski), an idealistic young Polish resistance fighter, the incipient Communist regime does not represent the hopes and dreams he and his brothers in arms have been fighting and dying for. FIPRESCI Prize, 1959 Venice Film Festival. (103 mins.)

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Tue, Sep 30, 2014
at 7 PM

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BLIND CHANCE
DIRECTOR: KRZYSZTOF KIEŚLOWSKI
POLAND, 1981/1987

“A fascinating precursor to Kieślowski’s THREE COLORS trilogy and a biting condemnation of the complex choices (or lack thereof) of individuals in a totalitarian regime, BLIND CHANCE was made near the beginning of the Solidarity period but banned after the declaration of martial law. A trilogy of stories following three possible life paths for its main character, in the first he becomes a Party member, in the second he joins a dissident movement, and in the third he decides ‘not to be involved in either.’ Highlighting the interconnected nature of fate, secondary characters from one segment turn up in another, while the ending unites them in a final tragedy.”—Pacific Film Archive. (114 mins.)

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Wed, Oct 1, 2014
at 7 PM

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A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING
DIRECTOR: KRZYSZTOF KIEŚLOWSKI
POLAND, 1988

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s epic miniseries The Decalogue—contemporary stories based on the Ten Commandments played out in a Warsaw apartment block—was a landmark innovation in late 1980s European television. A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING (from Decalogue V) tragically mixes the destinies of two odd and unsettling characters who wander the streets of Warsaw. The grim narrative is, in the end, an intelligent meditation on both the act of murder and the ordeal of capital punishment. (84 mins.)

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Thu, Oct 2, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE CONSTANT FACTOR
DIRECTOR: KRZYSZTOF ZANUSSI
POLAND, 1980

A naïve and sincere young man, Witold, must come to terms with the reality of the world. He dreams of climbing the Himalayas, just as his father had done before him. His skill in mathematics earns him a job in an international trade company, but he soon finds the position grating and his progress thwarted by his own candor. Frustrations mount and personal losses grow as Witold becomes disillusioned with the world’s false choices. “The chess-master precision of Zanussi’s narrative is closer, as film, to Bresson or Rohmer than it is to the passionate sprawls of Wajda or Kieślowski...every element in this spare, crystalline film is integrated into the whole.” —J. Hoberman. Jury Prize and Prize of the Ecumenical Jury, 1980 Cannes Film Festival. (98 mins.)

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Sun, Oct 5, 2014
at 4:15 PM

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NIGHT TRAIN
DIRECTOR: JERZY KAWALEROWICZ
POLAND, 1959

“A noirish psychological study and a hazily expressionistic tale of solitude, NIGHT TRAIN brings together two lonesome voyagers on an overnight train journey to the Baltic coast worthy of Hitchcock. Around them, a microcosm of the human experience plays out in the speeding railcars’ shadowy, cramped quarters: a coquette, bored with her older husband, attempts to seduce every available man; a former prisoner of a concentration camp fights his insomnia; and a stowaway seeks his beloved. Is a runaway murderer in their midst? The local police think as much and when they board at a way station, everything changes.”—Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. (99 mins.)

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Sun, Oct 5, 2014
at 7 PM

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MAN OF IRON
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND, 1981

A masterful story about the limitations of the press, coupled with real footage of the Solidarity movement strikes, Andrzej Wajda’s MAN OF IRON expands on the plot of its predecessor, MAN OF MARBLE. The film examines the events leading to one of the most crucial historical events of the 20th century. The movie was produced in haste at the express wish of the ship- yard workers with the use of their own archives to support the strike. It features, among others, future Nobel Prize Winner and Polish President Lech Walęsa as himself, and captures the passion, tragedy and anxiety of the times. Palme d’Or and Prize of the Ecumenical Jury, 1981 Cannes Film Festival. (153 mins.)

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Tue, Oct 7, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE HOURGLASS SANATORIUM
DIRECTOR: WOJCIECH HAS
POLAND, 1973

Magic, dreams, a manor in decay. THE HOURGLASS SANATORIUM is one of the most original and beautiful films in Polish cinema—a visionary, artistic, poetic reflection on the nature of time and the irreversibility of death. The screenplay is an adaptation of the fantasy fiction of Jewish author Bruno Schulz, one of the most renowned Polish prose stylists of the 20th century. Reflections on the Holocaust were added to the movie, reading Schulz’s work through the prism of his death during World War II. Jury Prize, 1973 Cannes Film Festival. In Polish, Yiddish, Hebrew and Latin with English subtitles. (124 mins.)

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