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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
(Re)Discoveries: New Restorations, New Prints

As cinema moves into its second century, the preservation of classic films is finding new life through digital technology and collaborative efforts by film archives and studios worldwide. At the same time, appreciation for the glories of 35mm film prints and the opportunity for new generations to see the originals on the big screen remains a distinct pleasure. The Film Center is pleased to present this selection of iconic classics enjoying a second life via restoration or preservation, either by digital magic or lovingly made film prints. We hope you’ll discover something new, or see a longtime favorite in an entirely new light.



Fri, Sep 5, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 6, 2014
at 7:30 PM

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SUNSET BOULEVARD
DIRECTOR: BILLY WILDER
US, 1950

Down-on-his luck screenwriter Joe Gillis (William Holden), out of work, rejected by the studios, and facing repossession of his car—a necessary tool in early ‘50s Los Angeles—seeks accidental refuge at the home of former silent film star Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson, in a career-defining role). Norma’s once-opulent but decaying estate, located just off Sunset Boulevard and overseen by her watchful servant Max von Mayerling (Erich von Stroheim), provides the backdrop for a tumultuous relationship pulled from Greek tragedy. Gillis seeks a stable situation, which Norma can provide, showering him with gifts and affection. But each feeds from the other, as Norma becomes harmfully infatuated with not only Gillis but also her dreams of a career resurrection, mentored long ago by the great Cecil B. DeMille. The merciless system of Hollywood, with its cast-offs and also-rans, provides Wilder with more than enough material to form a scathing critique wrapped in the allure of an unexpected love affair. (110 mins.)

2k digital restoration completed by Paramount Pictures in cooperation with the Library of Congress and the Academy Film Archive.


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Sat, Sep 6, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Sep 7, 2014
at 7 PM

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RIO BRAVO
DIRECTOR: HOWARD HAWKS
US, 1959

John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson team up in this idiosyncratic take on the “singing cowboy” Western from the ever-versatile Howard Hawks. When aging Sheriff John T. Chance (Wayne), who oversees a very small, unnamed Western town, arrests and jails accused murderer Joe Burdette (Claude Akins), Burdette’s brother Nathan vows revenge and hires guns with the intention of breaking Joe out. Chance, knowing he will be unable to hold off the Burdette clan, enlists Stumpy (Walter Brennan), his faithful deputy, Dude (Martin), the town drunk with demons to spare, and Colorado Ryan (Nelson), a young gunslinger with much to prove, to help him with the Burdette problem. Meanwhile, Feathers (Angie Dickinson), a beautiful local innkeeper, becomes increasingly involved in Chance’s affairs, much to his not-so-reluctant chagrin. As a showdown with the Burdettes looms, Chance is forced to evaluate his place and what kind of life he wants to live. “To watch RIO BRAVO is to see a master craftsman at work. The film is seamless. There is not a shot that is wrong. It is uncommonly absorbing.”—Roger Ebert. (141 mins.)

2k digital restoration completed by Warner Bros. from the original camera negative.


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Thu, Sep 11, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 13, 2014
at 7 PM

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SAFETY LAST!
DIRECTOR: FRED C. NEWMEYER & SAM TAYLOR
US, 1923

One of the most beloved comedies of the silent era and one of star Harold Lloyd’s most famous films, SAFETY LAST tells the story of “The Boy,” an industrious young man who moves from the country to the city seeking a better life. Upon arrival, he finds a job in a department store but quickly realizes its banality; however, when the store’s owner offers up a king’s ransom to anyone able to bring people in, the Boy hatches a plan involving a large clock tower outside and an unsuspecting friend. Meanwhile, the Boy’s girlfriend moves to the city believing he’s made it, considering all the fancy gifts he’s been sending her back home. In both instances, he gets much more than he bargained for. (70 mins.)

2k digital transfer made from an original nitrate print.


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Fri, Sep 12, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 14, 2014
at 4:30 PM

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ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL
DIRECTOR: RAINER WERNER FASSBINDER
WEST GERMANY, 1972

Fassbinder, who in his own way was always examining social norms and systems, here takes on the twin issues of explicit racism and love across generations, with his tale of the chance relationship between Moroccan guest worker Ali (El Hedi ben Salem) and aging, German-born housekeeper Emmi (Brigitte Mira), who meet in a bar when both are feeling depressed about their station in life. When their friends and families (among them Fassbinder himself as a lecherous boy- friend to one of Emmi’s daughters) learn of the relationship, each has a negative reaction, with actions ranging from out- ward rejection to humiliation. However, rather than focusing solely on the ugliness born of prejudice, Fassbinder focuses on Emmi and Ali’s love for each other, which takes on a poetic, hopeful tone for society in general. “For all his hatred of humanity, Fassbinder really loves his unlikely couple, and I think we wind up remembering this heartbreaking pair long after we’ve forgotten the plot or the argument.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum. (94 mins.)

35mm print courtesy of Janus Films.


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Sat, Sep 13, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Sun, Sep 14, 2014
at 7 PM

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ON APPROVAL
DIRECTOR: CLIVE BROOK
UK, 1944

In this, the second adaptation of Frederick Lonsdale’s classic comedy—the first coming in 1930—Clive Brook stars in his own production as George, the Duke of Bristol, who has recently fallen on hard times. Helen (Googie Withers), a wealthy American heiress, is infatuated with George; George’s friend Richard (Roland Culver) is in love with Maria (British stage legend Beatrice Lillie, in one of her few film roles). Hoping to gauge their level of commitment to each other, the two couples retreat to Maria’s isolated Scottish home—for an entire month. Soon, the idiosyncrasies of each personality appear and witty barbs fly like sparks in this largely unheralded comic gem from Brook—his lone directorial effort in a long and successful acting career. (80 mins.)

Newly struck 35mm print courtesy of Film Preservation Associates and Jessica Rosner. Screening on 35mm for the first time in nearly 50 years.


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Fri, Sep 19, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Sep 20, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Sep 21, 2014
at 7 PM

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MY DARLING CLEMENTINE
DIRECTOR: JOHN FORD
US, 1946

One of John Ford’s finest Westerns, and possibly the best known cinematic telling of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral myth, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE quietly shimmers in its focus on the lyrical side of the American West. Henry Fonda plays Wyatt Earp, the legendary yet reluctant lawman of Tombstone, where he and his brothers stop during a cattle drive only to find a lawless, ramshackle town in need of cleaning up. When the youngest Earp brother is murdered while watching their cattle, Wyatt seeks justice and takes over as town marshal just as the Clantons, the region’s nastiest gang, roll in to town. While Ford stays relatively faithful to the legend, his focus on the bourgeoning relationship between Earp and new arrival Clementine Carter (Cathy Downs) makes the film much more than a simple shoot-‘em-up in the classic Western mold. (97 mins.)

2k digital transfer completed by 20th Century Fox.


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Sat, Oct 25, 2014
at 4:30 PM

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IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT
DIRECTOR: FRANK CAPRA
US, 1934

Both at the peak of their considerable powers, Clark Gable stars opposite Claudette Colbert in Capra’s deeply felt, humane masterpiece of the recently-inaugurated Hays Code era. Ellie Andrews (Colbert), running from her father in the wake of her elopement with a dashing pilot, meets struggling newspaper reporter Peter Warne (Gable) on a New-York-to-Florida bus. Peter offers to either help Ellie reunite with her beau—somewhat selfishly, as he wants an exclusive on the story—or turn her in to her father. Here, Ellie’s choice is easy, but as she and Peter grow closer on their trip, populated with salt-of-the-earth working class folks, she has a much tougher decision to make: who will she choose to spend the rest of her life with? “Even though Capra’s film won all five of the top Oscars, it’s still pretty good.”—Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader. (105 mins.)

Digital restoration in 4k by Sony Pictures Entertainment at Colorworks.


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Sat, Oct 25, 2014
at 7 PM

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LOST HORIZON
DIRECTOR: FRANK CAPRA
US, 1937

Written by acclaimed screenwriter Robert Riskin (IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT, MEET JOHN DOE), and using a great deal of Columbia’s annual production budget, Capra’s fantastical film had a troubled production and even more troubled history, replete with lost footage, multiple endings, piecemeal restorations, and a place in film history as one of the wildest products to emerge from the classical Hollywood system. Fleeing a war-torn Chinese city during a Japanese invasion, Robert Conway (Ronald Colman), a diplomat and writer, falls in with a ragtag group of expats, but their plane, caught in a storm, crashes into the Himalayas. Upon their discovery by a bizarre caravan led by Chang (H.B. Warner), they are taken to Shangri-La, a mountain Utopia, where everything is peaceful and war is non-existent. However, Robert feels they have been captured and brought there for a very specific reason, one that only the mysterious High Lama (Sam Jaffe) can relate to him. Academy Awards for Best Interior Decoration and Best Editing. (132 mins.)

Digital restoration in 4k by Sony Pictures Entertainment at Colorworks. This restoration is the most complete ever made, and includes newly discovered material not seen in over 70 years.


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Fri, Oct 31, 2014
at 7 PM

Sat, Nov 1, 2014
at 7 PM

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JE T’AIME JE T’AIME
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS
FRANCE, 1968

Suffering from its canceled premiere at the 1968 Cannes Film Festival and only arriving in the US two years later to little fanfare, Resnais’ mid-career foray into science fiction developed somewhat of a cult following, but has remained largely unseen. Following Claude (Claude Rich), an average man who is enlisted in a speculative scientific experiment in which he will be able to travel through time into his personal past, Resnais’s film evokes a sanguine, yet familiar, version of a near future in which personal memory plays a vital role in our lives—contrary to other, more cynically dystopian visions. “In time, as it were, those [temporal] leaps add up to a cubistic portrait of a not especially remarkable man who becomes something more, not because of his commonplace life but because of the extraordinary manner in which his story emerges in its sweep and details, its simplicity and grandeur.”—Manohla Dargis, The New York Times. (94 mins.)

Newly struck 35mm print courtesy of The Film Desk and Bleeding Light Film Group.


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