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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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Volume 1

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Volume 1

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Volume 1

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Volume 7
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Volume 1

2005
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Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
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2000
Volume 4
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1999
Volume 5
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1998
Volume 5
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Volume 3
Kaleidoscopic Visions: Animation Classics

Our recent Studio Ghibli retrospective inspires this deeper dive into worlds brought to life by the magic of animators. Brilliant color, fantastic visions, incredible techniques, and equal measures of wit and wisdom reveal themselves in this selection of classics—features and shorts—that comprise a rich international legacy. Besides the history and dazzle, these films are just plain fun, so come enjoy this rare big-screen salute to the popular art of animation.



Sat, Jul 5, 2014
at 7 PM

Sun, Jul 6, 2014
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
Read Review
AKIRA
DIRECTOR: KATSUHIRO OHTOMO
JAPAN, 1988

Ohtomo’s influential work reinvigorated Western interest in Japanese anime and still feels cutting-edge to this day. Adapting the voluminous cyberpunk manga series of the same name, AKIRA depicts a post-apocalyptic Neo-Tokyo on the brink of destruction once again. Set against this backdrop, motorcycle gang members Tetsuo and Kaneda find themselves ensnared in a conspiracy much deeper than their nightly skirmishes with a rival gang of biker clowns, one that threatens to transform their friendship, Neo-Tokyo, and Tetsuo forever. (124 mins.)

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Sun, Jul 6, 2014
at 4:30 PM

Wed, Jul 9, 2014
at 7 PM

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Read Review
GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES
DIRECTOR: ISAO TAKAHATA
JAPAN, 1988

Helmed by Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata, GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES ranks among the greatest achievements of Japanese anime. The story follows two young siblings as they travel through the war-ravaged Japanese countryside searching for shelter after the bombing of their home and demise of their mother, in a supremely mournful film that calls into question what is sacrificed when nations clash. Chicago Sun-Times critic Roger Ebert championed the film, calling it “an emotional experience so powerful that it forces a rethinking of animation” and adding it to his running list of “The Great Movies.” (89 mins.)

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Sat, Jul 26, 2014
at 4 PM

THE COMPLETE FLEISCHER STUDIO SUPERMAN CARTOONS
DIRECTOR: MAX AND DAVE FLEISCHER
US, 1941-1942

Coming off the success of their Betty Boop and Popeye cartoons, Paramount Studios engaged brothers Max and Dave Fleischer to produce what ended up being some of the most ambitious theatrical animated shorts ever made. Sporting a vibrant and boldly rendered Technicolor sheen more akin to the look of the original comic book source material than any of the many Superman adaptations that followed, audiences thrilled to these dynamic animated marvels—still fresh 60 years later. (90 mins.)

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Sun, Jul 27, 2014
at 4:30 PM

THE SHORT ADVENTURES OF WALLACE AND GROMIT
DIRECTOR: NICK PARK
GREAT BRITAIN, 1989-2008

Established in 1972, Aardman Animation vaulted to international affection with the release of A GRAND DAY OUT (1989), the first of Nick Park’s stop-motion films depicting the outsized adventures of stodgy inventor/cheese enthusiast Wallace and his faithful and intellectually superior canine companion Gromit. In addition to GRAND DAY, this delightful program presents a complete overview of Park’s beloved Wallace and Gromit shorts, including THE WRONG TROUSERS (1993), A CLOSE SHAVE (1995), and A MATTER OF LOAF AND DEATH (2008). (113 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 2, 2014
at 4:30 PM

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WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT?
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ZEMECKIS
US, 1988

A private dick (played with gruff sincerity by the late Bob Hoskins), whose life has been ruined by ’toons, is forced to harbor a wacky rabbit superstar on the run in this live-action/animation hybrid that’s a rollicking send-up of film noir tropes, beginning with blackmail and leading to takes on the wrong man plot and the best “shave and a haircut” bit in Hollywood history. And then there’s an indelible femme fatale (voiced by Kathleen Turner) at the center of it all. Best of all, if you keep your eyes peeled, you’re bound to catch outrageous cameos from famous ’toon characters throughout the film. (104 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 3, 2014
at 4:30 PM

LOONEY TUNES: CLASSIC WARNER BROTHERS ANIMATION
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS
US, 1940-1960

Before they became the backbone of syndicated cartoon programming on television, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the rest of the Looney Tunes crew were a popular draw at movie palaces and neighborhood bijou cinemas alike, generally paired with a newsreel and live-action short and running before the feature presentation. This handpicked compilation of Warner Brothers classic animation includes fan favorites like WHAT’S OPERA, DOC? (1957), DUCK AMUCK (1953), and more! (80 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 3, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE POINT
DIRECTOR: FRED WOLF
US, 1971

AM radio icon Harry Nilsson provides the story in addition to the dynamic soundtrack—including the hit single “Me and My Arrow”—for Fred Wolf’s endearing film about a boy named Oblio (voiced by Mike Lookinland, Bobby from “The Brady Bunch”) who lives in a magical world where everything is pointed except for one thing: his head. When a prickly count banishes Oblio and his blue dog Arrow to the Pointless Forest for being different, the pair encounter several fascinating characters who collectively help Oblio realize that, despite his idiosyncrasies, there is more of a point to life than simply being pointed. Featuring voiceover narration by Ringo Starr. (74 mins.)

FREE ADMISSION


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Sun, Aug 10, 2014
at 7 PM

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MARY AND MAX
DIRECTOR: ADAM ELLIOT
AUSTRALIA, 2009

In this touching, clay-animated tale of profound intergenerational connection, Elliot spins the story of Mary, a lonely Australian girl from a broken home, who starts a letter correspondence with a complete stranger. Her pen pal turns out to be Max (voiced by the late great Philip Seymour Hoffman), an obese, anxiety-riddled New Yorker four times her age. As Mary grows up and their relationship deepens, her questions to Max become increasingly adult, pushing him into a downward spiral that forces him to gain new awareness of the roots of his condition. After twenty years of ongoing correspondence, Mary is a successful psychologist, writing a book on Asperger Syndrome stemming from her discussions with Max. However, his reaction upon learning about the book threatens their friendship and throws both of their worlds into chaos. Winner of the Grand Prize at the Ottawa International Animation Festival. (92 mins.)

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Sun, Aug 24, 2014
at 4:30 PM

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AN AMERICAN TAIL
DIRECTOR: DON BLUTH
US, 1986

After leaving behind his role at Disney as the animation director on such films as THE RESCUERS and PETE’S DRAGON, Don Bluth and a group of former Disney artists struck out on their own and soon had a hit with THE SECRET OF NIMH (1982). In collaboration with Steven Spielberg, Bluth followed NIMH up with the story of Fievel, a young mouse who is separated from his family during a forced emigration from Russia to America in the late 1800s. Displaying an uncommon emotional depth and accompanied by the Grammy Award-winning song “Somewhere Out There,” Fievel’s efforts to reunite with his loved ones form a tense and touching narrative of universal appeal. (80 mins.)

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Fri, Aug 29, 2014
at 7:30 PM

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Read Review
FANTASTIC PLANET
DIRECTOR: RENÉ LALOUX
FRANCE, 1973

Winner of the Special Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, FANTASTIC PLANET is a sci-fi parable involving a race of humans known as “Oms” and the much larger, blue-skinned Traags who keep them as pets. The relationship between owner and pet comes into question when an Om discovers the peaceful relation between them is soon to be disturbed. Using a unique cutout animation style and co-written by Laloux and the French surrealist artist Roland Topor, FANTASTIC PLANET is a cult classic with a reputation that has only grown with time. (72 mins.)

Mature audiences only.


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Fri, Aug 29, 2014
at 9 PM

Watch Trailer
FRITZ THE CAT
DIRECTOR: RALPH BAKSHI
US, 1972

As the first animated film to receive an X rating from the Motion Picture Association of America, Bakshi’s film courted controversy and enormous success around the world. Beyond its contentious content, the fracas extended to a very public disagreement between the filmmakers and cartoonist Robert Crumb over the imposition of serious themes on his original comic book creation. Despite all the furor, this dirty little film about a college-age cat on the prowl channels the spirit of the time in which it was set (the mid-1960s) and the moment in which it was produced (the post-Summer of Love comedown of the early 1970s). (78 mins.)

Mature audiences only.


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