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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Production/Distribution

In this series, co-presented by Yale Union and the Northwest Film Center, thirteen documentaries explore the production and distribution of material and immaterial goods. Some of these films were commissioned by companies representing specific interests, but the majority were made by filmmakers who felt compelled to record and scrutinize an often unseen facet of consumerism. Central to the program is the insight that with the advent of cinema, the world became visible in a whole new way, yet most mainstream films today still take place in a part of life in which we are led to believe that work does not exist, where goods seem almost immaculately conceived. The films of “Production/Distribution” consistently work against this lack of representation and describe the processes, facilities, locations, and durations of how things are made and transported. Special thanks to Robert Snowden and Lucas Quigley, co-curators of the series; thanks also to Hope Svenson. See yaleunion.org for detailed program notes.



Sat, Jan 4, 2014
at 6:30 PM

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Read Review
IN COMPARISON
DIRECTOR: HARUN FAROCKI
GERMANY, 2009

Farocki, who boasts a distinguished career as one of Europe’s foremost documentarians and whose films often critique the valences of modern life, here trains his camera on bricks and their differing modes of production around the world, in all sorts of contexts, both machine- and man-made. Through a distanced approach virtually devoid of judgment, IN COMPARISON reveals fundamental differences and surprisingly profound similarities between disparate cultures. “I wanted to make a film about concomitance and about contemporary production on a range of different technical levels. So I looked for an object that had not changed too much in the past few thousand years. This could have been a shoe or a knife, but a brick becomes part of a building and therefore part of our environment. So the brick appears as something of a poetic object.”—Harun Farocki, Artforum. (61 mins.)

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Sun, Jan 5, 2014
at 4:30 PM

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GENÈSE D’UN REPAS (GENESIS OF A MEAL)
DIRECTOR: LUC MOULLET
FRANCE, 1979

Bananas, eggs, and tuna: three basic foodstuffs with three wildly different points of origin. Moullet begins with these on his plate but constructs his film by working backwards and finding the sources for these items and how they reach our plates. As Moullet’s investigation deepens, however, the film moves beyond the confines of a simple exploration of food origins into more political and social realms, not only relating to food but also to the medium of film. (115 mins.)



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Fri, Jan 10, 2014
at 7 PM

THE SONG OF STYRENE
DIRECTOR: ALAIN RESNAIS
FRANCE, 1959

Written by acclaimed essayist Raymond Queneau, THE SONG OF STYRENE, commissioned by French plastics giant Péchiney, is ostensibly an investigation into the positive properties of plastics. However, when filtered through Resnais’s uniquely philosophical style of filmmaking, the film takes on a subversively fantastic tone. (19 mins.)

Thomas Beard, co-director of Brooklyn’s Light Industry, will introduce the film.

FOLLOWED BY

SLOW GLASS
DIRECTOR: JOHN SMITH
UK, 1991
“A nostalgic glazier shows off his knowledge and expounds his theories. Taking glassmaking processes and history as its central theme, SLOW GLASS explores ideas about memory, perception, and change.”—John Smith. (40 mins.)

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Thu, Jan 16, 2014
at 7 PM

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MEAT
DIRECTOR: FREDERICK WISEMAN
US, 1976

After spending much of the 1960s and early 1970s examining the complexity of official institutions of American life—the school, the court, the military, bureaucracy—Wiseman here turns his lens toward the food industry, specifically the production of beef and lamb. At times grisly but wholly incisive, MEAT is more than a precursor to politically aware documentary exposés on industrial food production; it is a deeper look at American life through the prism of a basic human need. “As always, [Wiseman] treats his viewer as a person of intelligence who can put together their own pattern of meaning without narration. And as always, he leads us to probe ourselves to see how we feel about what we are seeing on the screen. Like Wiseman’s earlier films, MEAT is disturbing, revealing, surprising—and masterful cinema.”—London Film Festival. (112 mins.)

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Sat, Jan 18, 2014
at 4 PM

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DUST
DIRECTOR: HARTMUT BITOMSKY
GERMANY, 2007

An extended essay focused on that smallest thing permeating our everyday lives, DUST uses interviews with a wide range of industrial workers, professional cleaners, meteorologists, artists, and others to evoke a sense of the sublime as the film takes on far-reaching strains of reflection about something which most of us never give a second thought. “Bitomsky’s dense, quicksilver voiceover, sense of philosophical depth, healthy good humor, and wry intellectual poetry make this journey from microscopic to macrocosmic a meditation on the splendor of the futility of existence.”—Film Comment. (90 mins.)

Director Hartmut Bitomsky will introduce the film.


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Sun, Jan 19, 2014
at 7 PM

BIOGRAPHIES OF OBJECTS
DIRECTOR: PETER NESTLER, ZSÓKA NESTLER
SWEDEN, 1970

In this four-film cycle made for Swedish television in the early 1970s, Peter and Zsóka Nestler collaborate on films about the history of crafts and the making of things. In these “biographies of objects,” the filmmakers undertake rigorous historical and material investigations into labor relations in addition to the history of materials, techniques, and their representation. This program includes MINING & IRONWORKS PART 2, ABOUT THE HISTORY OF PAPER PART 1, and ABOUT THE ADVENT OF THE PRINTING PRESS. (75 mins.)

Hartmut Bitomsky will introduce the program.


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Fri, Jan 24, 2014
at 7 PM

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THE FORGOTTEN SPACE
DIRECTOR: ALLAN SEKULA, NOËL BURCH
US, 2010

Based on Sekula’s “Fish Story,” a large-scale exhibition of photographs and accompanying texts depicting the international seabound shipping trade, THE FORGOTTEN SPACE sees that project gaining complexity through interviews with dock workers, engineers, politicians, and individuals directly affected by the trade. While the film’s scope is impressively wide-ranging, the filmmakers focus on the day-to-day to illuminate the ways in which seabound shipping profoundly affects all of us. “The sea is forgotten until disaster strikes. But perhaps the biggest seagoing disaster is the global supply chain, which—maybe in a more fundamental way than financial speculation—leads the world economy to the abyss.”—Sekula and Burch. (112 mins.)

Thom Andersen, faculty member in the Program in Film and Video at Cal Arts and personal friend to both filmmakers, will introduce the film.


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Sat, Jan 25, 2014
at 7 PM

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RR
DIRECTOR: JAMES BENNING
US, 2007

“Looping, chugging, and barreling by, the trains in Benning’s monumental film map a stunning topography and a history of American development. RR comes three decades after Benning and Bette Gordon made THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (1975), a cinematic journey along the country’s interstates that is keenly aware ‘of superhighways and railroad tracks as American public symbols.’ A political essay responding to the economic histories of trains as instruments in a culture of hyper-consumption, RR articulates its concern most explicitly when Eisenhower’s military-industrial complex speech is heard as a mile-long coal train passes through eastern Wyoming. Benning spent two and a half years collecting two hundred and sixteen shots of trains, forty-three of which appear in RR. The locomotives’ varying colors, speeds, vectors, and reverberations are charged with visual thrills, romance, and a nostalgia heightened by Benning’s declaration that this [was] his last work in 16mm film.”—Harvard Film Archive. (111 mins.)

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Sun, Jan 26, 2014
at 12 PM

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TIE XI QU: WEST OF THE TRACKS
DIRECTOR: WANG BING
CHINA, 2003

The massive, labyrinthine Tie Xi (literal translation: “west of the railway”), China’s oldest and largest manufacturing center, is the setting for Wang’s deeply patient and highly complex meditation on labor, class, capitalism, and survival in the rapidly changing 21st century. The film, shot covertly on handheld, consumer-grade cameras due to the overall lack of filmmaking freedom in China during the last several decades, is broken up into three parts: Part One tracks groups of workers at three different factories in Tie Xi; Part Two focuses on the workers’ families living in “Rainbow Row,” a state-run housing facility; and Part Three follows a father and son who scavenge loose parts to survive in Tie Xe’s overwhelmingly harsh landscape. Rarely screened in the United States, TIE XI QU stoically shows us the other side of the supply chain to which we have grown so accustomed. “Without question the greatest work to have come out of the Chinese documentary movement…must be ranked among the most extraordinary achievements of world cinema in the new century.”—New Left Review. (551 mins.)

RUST 12pm - 4:05pm
40 mintue break
REMNANTS 4:45pm - 7:45pm
30 mintue break
RAILS 8:15pm - 10:30pm



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Sat, Feb 1, 2014
at 3:30 PM

IBM: A SELF-PORTRAIT
DIRECTOR: ALBERT MAYSLES, DAVID MAYSLES
US, 1964

In this early Maysles film, the filmmakers visit the corporate headquarters of then-burgeoning IBM, interviewing average workers, executives, and everyone in between. In the process, they reveal the inner workings of the newly christened technological age’s frontier. “In sharp contrast to current, more calculated modes of corporate self-presentation, the Maysles evoke an institution through everyday minutiae and the individual psychologies of its workers.”—Light Industry. (35 mins.)

FOLLOWED BY

TOUJOURS MOINS AND TOUJOURS PLUS
DIRECTOR: LUC MOULLET
FRANCE, 1993, 2010
“In 1993, I filmed ALWAYS MORE (TOUJOURS PLUS). The indispensable complement was missing, LESS AND LESS (TOUJOURS MOINS), my 40th film. It evokes in 14 minutes the development and expansion, from 1968 to 2010, of the devices based on computers, automats, interactive terminals, and others that can be found everywhere. The aim of our current system appears to be to employ a single individual in each sector of activity. We are not there yet, but we’re getting there.... A schizophrenic world, since, at the same time, businesses have to pay the price for these suppressions in an indirect way. We can’t leave millions of human beings jobless. An observation that is both bitter and funny: the methods of this perpetual reduction are surprising and comical….”—Luc Moullet. (14 mins. and 24 mins.)

FOLLOWED BY

THE DARTY REPORT
DIRECTOR: Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville
FRANCE, 1989
"When commissioned to make an infomercial about an appliance store chain, Godard and Miéville shake their heads yes and no, deflect the straightness of the commercial job, and make an eccentric interrogative film about capitalism…”  - Yale Union (50 minutes)

Andy Rector, film critic and author of the Kino Slang blog, will introduce the program.


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Sun, Feb 2, 2014
at 7 PM

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Read Review
THE STORE
DIRECTOR: FREDERICK WISEMAN
US, 1983

In this fly-on-the-wall examination of the surrealism of the everyday, Wiseman points his camera at the flagship luxury department store Neiman Marcus in Dallas, Texas, during the 1982 holiday season and the height of fame of landmark TV series Dallas. Wiseman, granted unprecedented access to the store’s day-to-day operations, from sales meetings to showrooms, shows us the inner workings of Reagan-era capitalism through the prismatic lens of big retail. “Insatiable need, ostentatious greed, and desperate loneliness hang in the air, as sales clerks smooth-talk rich, insecure Texans into buying furs and jewels and other ‘indispensable’ luxury goods, and employers and management gather together over holiday celebrations filled with sad tinsel decorations and even sadder conversations.”—The Museum of Modern Art. (118 mins.)

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