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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Salute to Nikkatsu

Japan's oldest movie studio, Nikkatsu (Japan Cinematograph Company), founded in 1912, celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. Throughout the decades, its output has included early dramas, wild ’50s and ’60s action films—westerns, comedies, crime thrillers, and teen rebellion pictures—for which it is most famous, and even soft-core “roman Porno’’ which dominated its 1970s and ’80s productions. Over the years, such acclaimed films as Kon Icikawa’s BURMESE HARP and KOKORO, Shohei Imamura’s PIGS AND BATTLESHIPS and PROFOUND DESIRE OF THE GODS, Kenji Suzuki’s TOKYO DRIFTER and GATE OF FLESH, and Kenji Mizoguchi’s HOMETOWN were produced by the studio, films that also helped launch the careers of some of Japan’s most successful actors. This six-film, genre-crossing tribute dives deeper into the studio’s eclectic library to present some lesser-seen works that give testimony to the diverse talents the studio employed.

Special thanks to the Nikkatsu Corporation, the Japan Foundation, and the Consulate-General of Japan in Portland for making these rare 35mm prints available.

SPECIAL ADMISSION: $5. Thanks to the Japan Foundation.



Sat, Aug 11, 2012
at 7 PM

THE SUN LEGEND OF THE END OF THE TOKUGAWA ERA
DIRECTOR: YUZO KAWASHIMA
JAPAN, 1957

“This uproarious rakugo (traditional ‘sit-down’ comedy), co-written by Yuzo Kawashima, Shohei Imamura, and Keiichi Tanaka, was rated by Kinema Junpo as the fifth-greatest Japanese film of all time. Socialite Saheji (comedian Frankie Sakai) runs up a bill at a brothel and is forced to remain there until he works off his debt. However, Saheji takes advantage of the confusion leading up to the Meiji restoration (1860s), turning a profit and seducing the brothel’s staff.”—Film Society of Lincoln Center (110 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 18, 2012
at 7 PM

VOICE WITHOUT A SHADOW
DIRECTOR: SUZUKI SEIJUN
JAPAN, 1958

When speaking of Japanese “B” movies, one immediately thinks of Suzuki Seijun, the eccentric visionary of genre cinema. Based on a story by Japan’s most famous mystery novelist, Seicho Matsumoto, VOICE WITHOUT A SHADOW tells a crime story about a Tokyo news reporter’s quest to solve a cluster of seemingly unrelated murders; it's a classic hard-boiled set-up that deftly weds film noir toughness with a fascinating glimpse of a Japan in post-war transition. “Warped by the camera movement and editing, the space of the film combines with an underlying mood of sexual tension and perversity to foreground perception as the central problem both for the story and for the cinema.”—The Japan Foundation (92 mins.)

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Sat, Aug 25, 2012
at 7 PM

ALONE ACROSS THE PACIFIC
DIRECTOR: KON ICHIKAWA
JAPAN, 1963

An inspiring, powerful hymn to the human spirit, ALONE ACROSS THE PACIFIC tells the extraordinary real life story of a young man’s dreamy, obsessive quest to break free from the strictures of society. In 1962, Kenichi Horie (Yujiro Ishihara) embarks on a heroic attempt to sail his small sloop singlehandedly across the Pacific. Leaving Osaka in “The Mermaid,” it is 94 days of savage seas, grueling psychological torment, and the ultimate loneliness of the human condition before Horie finally sets sight on San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. Using Horie’s best-selling logbook as his source, Ichikawa portrays an epic struggle of man against nature with beautiful cinematography and an atmospheric score by renowned composer Toru Takemitsu. (104 mins.)

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Sat, Sep 1, 2012
at 7 PM

SUZAKI PARADISE: RED LIGHTS
DIRECTOR: YUZO KAWASHIMA
JAPAN, 1956

In unsentimental fashion and without judging his protagonists, Kawashima tells of the struggles and survival strategies of those on the margins of post-war Japanese society. An unwed couple takes refuge in a Tokyo red light district. Yoshigi (Mihashi Tatsuya) sells noodles while his companion Tsutue (Aratama Michiyo) finds work in a sake bar. But soon bitterness and self-pity emerge when Tsutue eyes another man of greater means. This was Kawashima’s personal favorite among his films, and its open embrace of its outsider characters was doubtless an influence on its soon-to-be famous assistant director, Shohei Imamura. (81 mins.)

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Wed, Sep 5, 2012
at 7 PM

CHARISMA
DIRECTOR: KIYOSHI KUROSAWA
JAPAN, 1999

Goro, a disgraced Tokyo detective, has fled the city after a hostage crisis ends in tragedy. He finds himself in a remote forest where the vegetation is diseased, the streams are polluted, and everything is dying or dead. Soon he is embroiled in a tense struggle involving a gnarled, forbidding tree. Is the solitary tree rare or a mutation? An eccentric caretaker fiercely protects the tree from a group of forest rangers who want to profit from it and a botanist who insists that the toxic tree must be destroyed. Can Goro redeem himself and “restore the rules of the world”? Masquerading as an ecological thriller, Kurosawa’s (CURE, PULSE) fascinating philosophical study is “a visually compelling, multi-layered, and insightful film on radicalism, individuality, and balance. Evoking the austere landscapes of Andrei Tarkovsky, Kurosawa similarly explores issues of conscience, spiritual longing, and personal disharmony through the manifestation of a metaphoric environmental malady.”—Strictly Film School (103 mins.)

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