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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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Volume 1

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Volume 7
Volume 6
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Volume 1

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Volume 1

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Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
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2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
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Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
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Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
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2000
Volume 4
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1999
Volume 5
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1998
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Volume 3
Treasures from the UCLA Film & Television Archive

The UCLA Film & Television Archive is, after the Library of Congress, the largest collection of media materials in the United States and among the premier film preservation institutions in the world. Its vaults hold more than 220,000 film and television titles and 27 million feet of newsreel footage. The Archive’s annual preservation efforts—an ambitious, eclectic range of everything from lost silents to at-risk mid-century features, shorts, and documentaries—find new audiences in each year’s Festival of Preservation in Los Angeles and in the works selected for a smaller touring program. This January, we are pleased to present the 17th Festival Tour, a surprise-filled treasure trove sure to delight cinema lovers of many persuasions. “The city’s most surprising, most stimulating, most invigorating film event.”—Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times. “Forget Blu-Ray discs and plasma TVs. For true cinephiles, nothing lets a movie really sing like a pristine celluloid print. In which case, UCLA’s Festival of Preservation is a veritable opera.”—Matt Sussman, Flavorpill.

Special thanks to Shannon Kelley, Head of Public Programs; Steven Hill, Circulation; Todd Weiner, Archivist; and Dr. Jan-Christopher Horak, Director, UCLA Film & Television Archive, for making these new preservation prints available.



Fri, Jan 6, 2012
at 7 PM

Sun, Jan 8, 2012
at 2 PM

COME BACK TO THE FIVE AND DIME, JIMMY DEAN, JIMMY DEAN
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US, 1982

On the 20th anniversary of their hero’s death, members of the all-female Disciples of James Dean fan club convene at their one-time clubhouse—a Woolworth’s near Marfa, Texas, where GIANT, Dean’s last film, was shot in 1955. Based on the Broadway play by Ed Graczyk (which Altman also directed), the stellar cast (Karen Black, Sandy Dennis, and Cher) inhabits a memorable set of past and present five-and-ten-cent stores separated by a two-way mirror as they bring to life a surprise-filled mix of confession and obsession. Never released on DVD and long out of circulation (it was the opening night film for PIFF 15), preservation of Altman’s independently produced film was funded by the Film Foundation and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. “When Altman gives a project everything he’s got, his skills are such that he can make poetry out of fake poetry and magic out of fake magic.”—Pauline Kael, New Yorker (109 mins.)

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Sat, Jan 7, 2012
at 5 PM

EVE’S LEAVES
DIRECTOR: PAUL SLOANE
US, 1926

After forming his own studio in 1925, Cecil B. DeMille produced this exuberant blend of orientalist melodrama and gender-bending comedy featuring his TEN COMMANDMENTS leading lady Leatrice Joy. An over-protective sea captain forces his daughter Eve (Joy) to pass as a boy. But she craves romance and sets her sights on a handsome American tourist (William Boyd) who still thinks she’s a boy when she shanghais him aboard her father’s ship; then a lustful Chinese pirate (Walter Long) takes them prisoner. Joy, an appealing comedienne whose career nosedived when talkies came in, sparkles in both her tomboy and love-hungry phases. (75 mins.)

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Sat, Jan 7, 2012
at 7 PM

Watch Trailer
CRY DANGER
DIRECTOR: ROBERT PARRISH
US, 1951

The milieu is seedy, the tone bitter, and the humor hardboiled in this intriguing low-budget noir thriller, set primarily around a shabby trailer court in LA’s Bunker Hill neighborhood. Deadpan par excellence, Dick Powell plays a recently released convict who was framed for a heist and has a lingering yen for his best friend’s wife (Rhonda Fleming). The central couple is nearly upstaged by the vivid supporting characters of a cynical one-legged veteran (Richard Erdman) and a good-natured blonde pickpocket (Jean Porter). “A crackerjack crime film—short, smart, sassy, and full of surprises.”—Eddie Muller, Film Noir Foundation (79 mins.)

Preservation funded by the Film Noir Foundation.

FOLLOWED BY

SLEEP, MY LOVE
DIRECTOR: DOUGLAS SIRK
US, 1948
“Before he became identified with melodramas, Douglas Sirk directed some top-notch noirs, including LURED, SHOCKPROOF, and this highly entertaining entry in the victimized-wife vein of SUSPICION and GASLIGHT. A Manhattan woman (Claudette Colbert) seems to be going crazy, much to the apparent dismay of her concerned husband (Don Ameche), but a lovestruck friend (Robert Cummings) suspects otherwise. Sirk demonstrates his customary flair with staircases and mirrors, and short-careered Hazel Brooks is a fabulously slinky femme fatale operating out of a crummy photography studio.”—Marty Rubin (92 mins.)

( 171 min )
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Sun, Jan 8, 2012
at 4:30 PM

THE GOOSE WOMAN
DIRECTOR: CLARENCE BROWN
US, 1925

Sensational fact and generic fiction mingle in this melodrama of misguided motherhood anchored by Louise Dresser’s bravura performance. The Hall-Mills murder case, one of the most notorious crimes of the 1920s, was marked by the unreliable testimony of a woman whose hog-raising livelihood earned her the epithet “Pig Lady.” The film transforms her into an ex-opera diva reduced to living on a squalid goose farm. The murder trial gives her an opportunity to reclaim the limelight ... but at the cost of incriminating her own son (Jack Pickford). (85 mins.)

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Sun, Jan 8, 2012
at 7 PM

WANDA
DIRECTOR: BARBARA LODEN
US, 1970

Barbara Loden, once known only as Elia Kazan’s wife and favorite actress, was eventually celebrated as an American auteur for this exceptional portrait of a woman living a life of quiet desperation in rural, working-class Pennsylvania in the 1960s. A formative work in the independent cinema movement, WANDA’s sensitive take on a complex subject earned it a spot in the pantheon of great cinéma vérité. “A brilliantly atmospheric film with a superb performance by Loden.”—Chicago Reader. “Overwhelming. ... There’s a commitment to real people that you may have never seen before.”—Village Voice (102 mins.)

Preservation funded by the Film Foundation and Gucci.


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Tue, Jan 10, 2012
at 7 PM

ON THE VITAPHONE, 1928-1930
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS
US, 1928-1930

Warner Bros., Bell Labs, and Western Electric devised Vitaphone’s synchronized sound technology. While not the earliest sync sound system, Vitaphone in its day was a real innovation—discs and film used the same motor, so matching sound and image became less risky. UCLA is restoring its collection of these musical and comic shorts in collaboration with Warner Bros., the Library of Congress, and the Vitaphone Project. This program features gems such as Ann Codee and Frank Orth in A BIRD IN THE HAND; NIAGARA FALLS; SHE WHO GETS SLAPPED; Marlow and Jordan in SONGS AND IMPRESSIONS; Dooley and Sales in DOOLEY’S THE NAME; WHAT A LIFE; TRIFLES; and Arthur Pat West in SHIP AHOY. (100 mins.)

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Sat, Jan 14, 2012
at 4 PM

NATIVE LAND
DIRECTOR: PAUL STRAND, LEO HURWITZ
US, 1942

One of the most celebrated political films in American history, NATIVE LAND was based on the Senate’s LaFollette Civil Liberties Committee hearings on labor union busting and corporate spying and was a paean to the labor movement, assembled largely from newsreels and staged sequences. More revolutionary in tone than any of Strand’s previous films (such as THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAINS), the film’s impressive leftist credentials include screenwriter Ben Maddow, composer Marc Blitzstein, actors Art Smith and Howard Da Silva, and Paul Robeson, whose voice unifies the film with voiceover narration and songs. (80 mins.)

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Sun, Jan 15, 2012
at 4 PM

Read Review
THIS IS YOUR LIFE: HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS
PORTLAND JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL BENEFIT
DIRECTOR: AXEL GRUENBERG, RICHARD GOTTLIEB
US, 1953-1961

In each episode of the famed 1950s NBC television show “This Is Your Life,” a surprise (and surprised) guest would (in reality TV fashion) have their life inspirationally recapped by host Ralph Edwards. The episodes here present the stories of three women who survived the Holocaust: “Hanna Bloch” (in an episode aired May 27, 1953), featuring the first Holocaust survivor to describe her experiences on national television; “Ilse Stanley” (November 2, 1955), honoring a German actress who helped free more than 400 people from concentration camps; and “Sara Veffer” (March 19, 1961), featuring a Dutch woman whose family hid for 18 months in a tiny attic. (85 mins. plus discussion time)

Julie Kohner, daughter of Hanna Bloch Kohner, will be in attendance.

Join us for a post-screening reception in the Portland Art Museum’s Andree Stevens Room.


This afternoon’s program, co-sponsored by the Institute for Judaic Studies, is a benefit for the 19th Portland Jewish Film Festival, April 15-29. Tickets: $36, available in advance on the Film Center’s website or at IJC. Special thanks to the Ralph and Barbara Edwards Family Trust.


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Sun, Jan 15, 2012
at 7 PM

THE CRUSADES
DIRECTOR: CECIL B. DEMILLE
US, 1935

A DeMille milestone rarely revived, THE CRUSADES compensates for its famously flamboyant historical analysis with wonderfully absurdist Hollywood abandon—hundreds of sword-wielding extras amid lavish pre-Code costumes and set pieces. The scenario posits the violent takeover of Jerusalem by the Islamic warrior Saladin and the Pan-European response—not to mention romantic alliances—to this supposed offense against Christianity’s holiest site. Released in the wake of the great success of DeMille’s CLEOPATRA (1934), this extraordinary though financially failed film has now been deemed worthy of reappraisal as a critical work by an American master at the height of his powers. (125 mins.)

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Thu, Jan 19, 2012
at 7 PM

THE CHALICE OF SORROW
DIRECTOR: REX INGRAM
US, 1916

Ingram’s third feature film and the first after his relocation from New York to Hollywood, THE CHALICE OF SORROW is a loose adaptation of Victorien Sardou’s play LA TOSCA (also the source of Puccini’s opera), with the setting transposed from Rome to Mexico City. Cleo Madison, one of the most important early Hollywood actresses, stars as Lorelei, a renowned opera singer who loves an American artist but is lusted after by the corrupt Mexican governor. When the governor’s machinations succeed in getting the artist framed for murder and sentenced to death, he offers Lorelei one way of saving her lover. Those familiar with the opera (or with Bugs Bunny’s last line in WHAT’S OPERA, DOC?) will know what to expect. (70 mins.)

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Thu, Jan 19, 2012
at 8:30 PM

Fri, Jan 20, 2012
at 7 PM

WAITING FOR GODOT
DIRECTOR: ALAN SCHNEIDER
US, 1961

“Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play is one of the most important works of twentieth-century literature, as well as an enormously entertaining showcase for actors. Beckett resisted all efforts to film the play during his lifetime, but the barrier was relaxed for this 1961 telecast by the ambitious New York-based series ‘Play of the Week.’ Kurt Kasznar (Pozzo) and Alvin Epstein (Lucky) reprise their roles from the original 1956 Broadway production, while a double casting coup puts Burgess Meredith and then-blacklisted Zero Mostel in the shabby shoes of the wandering tramps Vladimir and Estragon.”—Marty Rubin (102 mins.)

Kathy Reicker, a psychoanalyst in private practice in Portland who treats adults and adolescents, will be representing the Oregon Psychoanalytic Center during Friday’s post film discussion.


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