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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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The Films of Charlie Chaplin

Once dubbed “the most famous man in the world,” Charlie Chaplin is recognized as one of the preeminent icons of both comedy and cinema. From 1914 until 1967, Chaplin wrote, directed, produced, and starred in more than 80 films, quickly advancing from basic slapstick to a unique comic style—immaculately constructed, deeply human, and always hilarious. Chaplin’s most recognizable character is the Little Tramp, a well-meaning gent in a raggedy suit with a cane, who always finds himself wobbling into awkward situations and then miraculously wobbling his way out. More than any other figure, it is this kind-hearted character that we associate with the time before the talkies. Arguably the most influential film comedian in history, Chaplin’s antics have inspired generations of talents from Jackie Chan to Johnny Depp while retaining their unique, universal appeal. We’re pleased to present this broad survey of Chaplin’s work on new, beautifully restored 35mm prints.



Fri, Mar 11, 2011
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 13, 2011
at 5 PM

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MODERN TIMES
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1936

The Little Tramp punches in and wigs out inside a factory where gizmos like an employee-feeding machine may someday make the lunch hour last just 15 minutes. Bounced into the ranks of the unemployed, he teams with a street waif (Paulette Goddard) to pursue bliss and a paycheck, finding misadventures as a roller-skating night watchman, a singing waiter whose hilarious song is gibberish, a jailbird, and more. In the end, as Tramp and waif walk arm in arm into an insecure future, we know that while they have found neither bliss nor a paycheck, they have each other. (87 mins.)

PRECEDED BY

PAY DAY
DIRECTOR: Charlie Chaplin
US, 1922

Charlie is a bricklayer who sets off to celebrate payday with his pals. But his wife is waiting with the rolling pin. (22 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 12, 2011
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 13, 2011
at 2:30 PM

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CITY LIGHTS
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1931

Talkies were well entrenched when Charles Chaplin swam against the tide with this classic that is silent except for music and sound effects. The story, involving the Tramp’s attempts to get money for an operation that will restore sight to a blind flower girl, provides the star with an ideal framework for sentiment and laughs. The Tramp is by turns a street sweeper, a boxer, a rich poseur, and a rescuer of a suicidal millionaire. His message is unspoken but universally understood: love is blind. (87 mins.)

PRECEDED BY

A DAY’S PLEASURE
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1919

Charlie decides to take his wife and children on a boat trip, but the family car proves somewhat recalcitrant. (19 mins.)

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Fri, Mar 18, 2011
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 20, 2011
at 5:15 PM

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THE KID
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1921

One heaves rocks through windows. The other happens by in the nick of time to offer his services as an expert window repairman. It’s a con system that works every time. So does everything else about this beloved Chaplin classic, whose blend of laughs and pathos changed the notion of what a screen comedy could be. For the first time as a filmmaker, Chaplin stepped into feature-length storytelling with this tale of the down-but-never-out Tramp (Chaplin) and the adorable ragamuffin (six-year-old Jackie Coogan) who, rescued as a foundling and raised in the School of Hard Knocks by the Tramp, is his inseparable sidekick. (54 mins.)

FOLLOWED BY

THE IDLE CLASS
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1921

Charlie is the spitting image of a rich woman’s drunken husband. At a masked ball, her inability to distinguish one from the other leads to much confusion. (32 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 19, 2011
at 4 PM

Tue, Mar 22, 2011
at 7 PM

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THE CHAPLIN REVUE
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN

Three of Chaplin’s most celebrated shorts: A DOG’S LIFE (1918) finds Charlie in possession of some stolen loot, thanks to a dog he befriends; however, the real wrongdoers want their ill-gotten gains back. In SHOULDER ARMS (1918), Charlie discovers the hard life in the trenches and the dangers of combat as a haplessly enlisted man during the First World War. THE PILGRIM (1923) features Charlie as a prison escapee in disguise as a pastor, only to be mistaken for a village’s new curate by its townspeople. (112 mins.)

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Sat, Mar 19, 2011
at 6:30 PM

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A WOMAN OF PARIS
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1923

“The first serious drama written and directed by myself,” goes the opening title. For his première United Artists release, Chaplin chose a sophisticated drama sans himself (apart from a heavily-disguised cameo), with frequent leading lady Edna Purviance as the eponymous femme kept by rich philanderer Adolphe Menjou. “A landmark in sophisticated sexual screen drama.”—Elliot Stein. (82 mins.)

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Wed, Mar 23, 2011
at 7 PM

Sat, Mar 26, 2011
at 8:30 PM

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A KING IN NEW YORK
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
UK, 1958

Forced out of the US in 1952 for suspected Communist sympathies, Chaplin lashed back in exile with this scathing satire of everything American—from McCarthyism witch-hunts to Cinemascope and rock and roll—as he plays his last full role, a deposed and impoverished monarch seeking refuge in Manhattan (though the film was shot in England). “Hugely funny, healthily vulgar.”—The New York Times. (110 mins.)

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Thu, Mar 24, 2011
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 27, 2011
at 2:30 PM

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THE GREAT DICTATOR
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1940

The US was not yet in World War II when Chaplin leveled his comedy arsenal at Der Fuehrer by playing the dual roles of Hitler-like Adenoid Hynkel and a Jewish barber who is a dead-ringer for der Nutsie. Puns, sight gags, and slapstick abound as Chaplin skewers fascism, balancing his attack with poignant scenes of a ghetto in the clutches of storm-trooping terror. “A truly great achievement by a truly great artist.”—The New York Times. (124 mins.)

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Fri, Mar 25, 2011
at 7 PM

Sun, Mar 27, 2011
at 5 PM

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THE CIRCUS
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1928

When we first meet Chaplin’s Tramp in this comic gem, he’s in typical straits: broke, hungry, destined to fall in love, and just as sure to lose the girl. Mistaken for a pickpocket and pursued by a peace officer into a circus tent, the Tramp becomes a star when delighted patrons think his escape from John Law is an act. At the first ever Academy Awards ceremony, Chaplin was honored with a special statuette “for versatility and genius in writing, acting, directing, and producing THE CIRCUS.” And, it went without saying, for again bringing laughter to packed movie palaces across America. (72 mins.)

PRECEDED BY

SUNNYSIDE
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1919

Charlie is a farm laborer who will try anything to win over his pretty neighbor, but who ends up spending a lot of time in dreamland instead. (30 mins.)

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Tue, Mar 29, 2011
at 7 PM

Sat, Apr 2, 2011
at 4 PM

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MONSIEUR VERDOUX
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
UK, 1947

“VERDOUX stars Chaplin as the mustachioed Bluebeard in beret and cravat whose charming manners and good looks cloak a deep-seated, murderous hatred, festering since the loss of his longstanding job as a bank clerk. The film includes such unforgettable moments as Verdoux snipping roses in his garden while an incinerator rages behind him and his infamous pre-guillotine salvo, an indictment of humanity’s cyclical follies. Plagued with censorship problems early on and temporarily pulled from distribution in the US at the height of the Cold War Hollywood witch-hunts, VERDOUX was initially vilified for its risqué societal critique.”—Andréa Picard, Cinematheque Ontario. (124 mins.)

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Fri, Apr 1, 2011
at 6 PM

Sun, Apr 3, 2011
at 1 PM

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LIMELIGHT
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
UK, 1952

LIMELIGHT offers a glimmering homage to a bygone entertainment era and a bittersweet tale of an artist passing the torch to a new generation. Chaplin portrays Calvero (the “Tramp Comedian,” per an old theatrical poster in his room), who rescues a distraught ballerina (Claire Bloom) from suicide and mentors her to success. Among the film’s comedy highlights is a musical routine that’s anything but routine in the hands of legends Chaplin and stone-faced Buster Keaton. The extraordinary score by Chaplin, Raymond Rasch, and Larry Russell earned the screen legend his only competitive Oscar. (137 mins.)

Lauren A. Berg, Oregon Psychoanalytic Center, will lead a discussion after the screening on April 1.


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Sat, Apr 2, 2011
at 7 PM

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THE GOLD RUSH
DIRECTOR: CHARLIE CHAPLIN
US, 1925

In search of gold in turn-of-the-century Alaska, Charlie takes refuge with a fellow prospector in an isolated, comically imbalanced cabin, where hunger forces him to eat that famous shoe. This is the masterpiece that features more classic Chaplin moments than any other: the dance of the rolls, the cabin tottering over the cliff, the giant chicken, and more. This version includes Chaplin’s own music and poetic narration, added for the 1942 reissue. (124 mins.)

The 2010 Youth Silent Film Festival First Place winning entry, "All Alone," directed by Eddie Woltrabe, age 13, will precede tonight's screening.


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