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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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November/December 2010
Tue, Nov 16, 2010 - Sun, Dec 26, 2010

This year, we depart from the usual contemporary focus of our annual Japanese Currents series to explore in depth the evolution of a particularly Japanese film genre: the samurai film. Fittingly, this year also marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Akira Kurosawa, the legendary director whose films are perhaps most commonly associated with the genre. But the samurai film has come a long way since Kurosawa’s epics of the 1950s, venturing into subgenres of horror, exploitation film, melodrama, even comedy. Its influence has permeated international cinema, inspiring prominent Western filmmakers, critics, and fans alike. The samurai era may have passed, but as the screenings in this series demonstrate, the samurai film genre, now some sixty years old, is alive and fighting.

Special thanks to the Japanese Consulate of Portland for its support of the series. Co-sponsored by the Japan America Society of Oregon.



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When it began one hundred years ago, the Mexican Revolution was one of the first major armed conflicts of the 20th century. It was the first war to be captured on film, and the images of the conflict—spread throughout the world—put the nobility of the democratic struggle against the regime of Porfirio Díaz into the popular imagination of artists, writers, filmmakers, and audiences around the world. In conjunction with a year of celebrating the centennial of the Revolution, we are pleased to present a selection of Revolution-inspired works, including a rare screening of newly restored 35mm prints of Fernando de Fuentes’ classic Revolution Trilogy: EL COMPADRE MENDOZA (1934), PRISONER NUMBER 13 (1933), and LET’S GO WITH PANCHO VILLA (1936).

Special thanks to the Mexican Consul General, Portland, and Filmoteca de la UNAM, Mexico City, for making the films available.


Cuando se inició hace cien años, la revolución mexicana fue uno de los primeros grandes conflictos armados del siglo 20. Fue la primera guerra capturada en película.  Las imágenes del conflicto muestran al mundo la nobleza de la lucha democrática contra el régimen de Porfirio Díaz en la imaginación popular de los artistas, escritores, cineastas y espectadores de todo el mundo. A un a;o de celebrar el bicentenario de la Revolución Mexican, nos complacemos en presentar una selección de obras inspiradas en la Revolución, incluyendo una proyección exclusiva recién restaurada en 35 mm de la Trilogía clásica de Fernando de Fuentes 'Revolución: El Compadre Mendoza (1934), Prisionero número 13 (1933), y Vamos con Pancho Villa (1936).

Con un agradecimiento especial al Cónsulado de México en Portland,  a la Filmoteca de la UNAM, y a la Ciudad de México, por hacernos disponibles las películas.



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