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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Harmonic Resistance: The Films of Béla Tarr
Although little known to American audiences outside of the art/film festival realm, Hungarian filmmaker Béla Tarr is one of the most innovative and accomplished auteurs working in cinema today. Tarr's films, set in contemporary Hungary, move toward metaphysical explorations of human conditions and states of mind that transcend any particular environment. Specificity leads to ambiguity, chaos to order, and order to disaster—but all are held together by an accomplished cinematic style marked by long takes, minimal dialogue, intricate camera movements, haunting black and white images and the occasional discordant, yet strangely beautiful, music of Mihály Vig. In his films, the various structural elements, including location and time, are harmonized according to principles of music and dance, invoking the drama and passion of life from Tarr's singular, mordant perspective. Without discernable dreams, Tarr's characters struggle to find their way in the grim world and as they do demand much from an adventurous viewer. Yet along with the bleak view and formalist aesthetic lies a gallows humor and sense of exhilaration that is transcendant. We are please to present imported prints of DAMNATION and SATANTANGO, not in distribution in the US, and thank Adam Sekuler of Northwest Film Forum and Katalin Vadja of Magyar Filmunio, Budapest, for arranging their availability for these rare screenings.

Sun, Nov 19, 2006
at 7 PM

Thu, Nov 23, 2006
at 7 PM

DAMNATION
DIRECTOR: BÉLA TARR
HUNGARY
"The film is about the landscape, the elements, and nature, about a unique world in which nothing remains."—BT. "DAMNATION [was] one of Susan Sontag's favorite films and, with its willful violation of cinematic norms, it's easy to see why. [M]any of the hallmarks of [Antonioni and Tarkovsky's] relentless black and white style and vision—lots of rain, fog, and stray dogs; murky and decaying bars; artfully composed long takes made up of very slow and almost continuous camera movements, off screen mechanical noises—are so forcefully present here that one might argue that the film makes a fetish of gloom. The rather bare story line in the middle of this—a reclusive loner is hopelessly in love with a cabaret singer, hopes to find salvation in her, and gets her husband involved in a smuggling scheme so he can spend some time with her—seems almost secondary to the formal beauty of Tarr's spellbinding arabesque around the dingiest of all possible industrial outposts. The near miracle is that something so compulsively watchable can be made out of a setting and society that seem so depressive and petrified."—Jonathan Rosenbaum, CHICAGO READER. ( 119 min )


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Sat, Nov 25, 2006
at 1 PM

Sun, Nov 26, 2006
at 1 PM

SÁTÁNTANGÓ
DIRECTOR: BÉLA TARR
HUNGARY/GERMANY/SWITZERLAND
Considered by many to be Tarr's masterpiece and a legendary cinematic landmark, SÁTÁNTANGÓ has been hailed as a definitive statement on the end of Communism in Eastern Europe. Over seven hours long, Tarr's epic maps the crumbling of a small, failed collective farm into dissolution and betrayal. Believing that there are monies owed them, the villagers wait for their due, drinking heavily in the rain and gloom and some conspiring to leave with more than their fair share. Unfolding in twelve chapters, Tarr has said that the film's form was inspired by the tango—six steps forward, six back—an idea also reflected in the overlaps of the time scheme. Defending the film's length he has said: "You can't read 'War and Peace'in one sitting," and indeed, you are not so much as watching a film as taking an extended, sarcastic journey to the village of Melancholia for close consideration of the horror and humor of the human condition. "Devastating, enthralling for every minute of its seven hours. I'd be glad to see it every year for the rest of my life."—Susan Sontag. "A film by turns funny, bleak and moving. . . an epic work by one of the world's most impressive filmmakers"— Dimitri Eipides, TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL. ( 435 min )


435 mins. total; Part I, 300 mins.;Part II, 135 THE FILM WILL SCREEN EACH DAY IN TWO PARTS, WITH A 15 MINUTE INTERMISSION IN PART I AND A 60-MINUTE DINNER BREAK BETWEEN PARTS I & II. SPECIAL SCREENING ADMISSION: $12 GENERAL; $10 ART MUSEUM MEMBERS, SILVER SCREEN CLUB AND STUDENTS. YOU MAY SEE PART I SATURDAY AND RETURN SUNDAY FOR PART II.

The Park Bistro (615 SW Park Ave) is proud to sponsor the 60 minute dinner break between Parts 1 & 2 of Satantango. On both Saturday and Sunday, diners will receive a special 15% discount off of any purchase at the restaurant. Dinner and a movie-enjoy!
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Wed, Nov 29, 2006
at 7 PM

Thu, Nov 30, 2006
at 7 PM

WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES
DIRECTOR: BÉLA TARR
HUNGARY
Set in the dismal rural world of DAMNATION and SÁTÁNTANGÓ, WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES is a gothic exploration of the precarious boundaries between civilization and barbarism. Turning to a book that bears the beautiful title "The Melancholy of Resistance," Tarr traverses the territory of empty lives, alcoholic evenings and muddy roads in a desolate Hungarian village. When a circus comes to town, a strangely inactive, divided, and restless population awaits the promise of two bizarre attractions—a magnificent stuffed whale and the mysterious,"Prince," possessor of magnetic powers. But as hopes are dashed frustration takes hold and an uneasy day of reckoning comes. "I have been divinely influenced by Bela Tarr (GERRY, ELEPHANT). . .he is one of the few genuinely visionary filmmakers."—Gus Van Sant. With Lars Rudolph, Peter Fitz and Hanna Schygulla. ( 145 min )


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