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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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Faculty Picks


Thu, Sep 16, 2010
at 8 PM

SANS SOLEIL
DIRECTOR: CHRIS MARKER
FRANCE, 1982

FACULTY PRESENTER: BUSHRA AZZOUZ—A complex journey into time and memory, Marker’s free-form travelogue roams from Africa to Japan, guided by fluid associative editing and an unnamed narrator. One of cinema’s most compelling essayists, Marker’s dizzying juxtapositions bounce around the globe like a pinball: a woman’s smile on the Cape Verde Islands, guerilla warfare in Guinea Bissau, a volcanic eruption in Iceland, a recherché of Hitchcock’s VERTIGO locations in San Francisco... Marker dissolves the distinctions between fiction and nonfiction, his “documentary” constantly verging off into a dream state full of dislocated cultures.

Tonight we welcome School of Film faculty member Bushra Azzouz to share her perspective on one of the classics of personal cinema. “I have always been deeply moved by the film’s exploration of the experiential poetics of being, culture, and cinema—how its images and sounds reconstitute themselves into new relationships, layers, and meanings.”—BA.

( 100 min )

DIGITAL PRESENTATION

Sponsored by Willamette International Travel.


WATCH THE TRAILER


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Sun, Sep 19, 2010
at 7 PM

CAMERA BUFF
DIRECTOR: KRZYSTOF KIESLOWSKI
POLAND, 1979

FACULTY PRESENTER: ANDY BLUBAUGH—Tonight we welcome School of Film instructor and filmmaker Andy Blubaugh (HELLO THANKS, SCAREDYCAT) to introduce one of his favorite films, which happens to be about filmmaking. “Filip (Jerzy Stuhl), a factory worker, purchases a movie camera to film his wife and daughter. But when he instead turns his lens on the greater world around him, he earns a modicum of acclaim as a filmmaker that threatens the very life he sought to document for posterity. In light of the tangled storylines and obtuse themes of Kieslowki’s later THREE COLORS TRILOGY, CAMERA BUFF appears quaintly simple, and the theme of the film—that an artist’s obligations to his art and to the people he loves are often in direct opposition—is nothing new. But set against the bleak backdrop of Communist Poland, the exhilaration that Filip sees in the potential of his future—as new father and then as filmmaker—is especially palpable, as is his heartbreak when that future begins to crumble.”—AB.

( 117 min )

Sponsored by Pro Photo Supply.


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Wed, Sep 22, 2010
at 7 PM

BADLANDS
DIRECTOR: TERRENCE MALICK
US, 1973

FACULTY PRESENTER: SUE ARBUTHNOT—Tonight we welcome School of Film faculty member Sue Arbuthnot to introduce one of her favorite films. “Modeled loosely on mass murderer Charles Starkweather and his girlfriend Caril Fugate’s 1950s shooting spree across the Midwest, Malick’s stark, unsettling, yet poetic rendering offers a meditation on mid-century love and crime with a droll, existential twist. Malick paints a spare, unsentimental, yet gorgeous visual world, through which Kit and Holly (Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek) meet and flee after Kit kills Holly’s disapproving father. What might not be expected, and what is rarely noted, is that Malick’s first-film masterpiece is often very funny, thanks to brilliant writing and acting. As with later work, such as DAYS OF HEAVEN and THE THIN RED LINE, Malick combines lyricism and violence and creates precisely drawn, often alienated characters. The timeless BADLANDS is far more daydream than morality play and leaves a lingering, satisfying impression.”—SA.

( 94 min )

WATCH THE TRAILER


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