Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
April/May/June 2010
Fri, Apr 2, 2010 - Sun, Jun 6, 2010

Welcome to the 18th annual Portland Jewish Film Festival, presented by the Northwest Film Center and the Institute for Judaic Studies. We hope you find that this year’s films, while they express specific Jewish experiences, resonate beyond their cultural settings and speak to experiences and issues that confront our common humanity. This year’s Festival is co-sponsored by the Jewish Review with individual program support from Cedar-Sinai, Neveh Shalom, Mittleman Jewish Community Center, and Portland Jewish Academy with additional promotional support from Portland Center Stage and Mother's Bistro.

All shows are separate admission.



^ Top

Though Eric Rohmer, Jean-Luc Godard, Jacques Rivette, François Truffaut, and Claude Chabrol are all central to the French New Wave and all shared in the critical adventures found in the pages of Cahiers du Cinema, it was Rohmer, who passed away this January at the age of 89, who maintained the steadiest course. Following up on such classic films as MY NIGHT AT MAUD'S (1969), CLAIRE’S KNEE (1970), and CHLOE IN THE AFTERNOON (1972), Rohmer completed a singular body of work touching on the most universal of subjects—matters of the heart. More literary than theatrical in his examinations of the complexities of romance, his characters talk, think, and observe with unique intensity. But what keeps his featherweight dramas and supercilious characters infinitely engaging is how their actions serve to illuminate complex philosophical and ethical dilemmas. In Rohmer’s films, the focal points are never on what the characters say or do, but on the distance between those two, in that netherworld between language and action in which we all try to make sense of the world and ourselves. A fuller retrospective is deserving, but for now enjoy these quintessentially French favorites.



^ Top

“In all the universe nothing remains permanent and unchanged but the spirit.”
—Anton Chekhov, "The Seagull"

This year marks the 150th anniversary of Anton Chekhov’s birth. He is one of the most celebrated figures in the history of literature, and his works are still performed and filmed throughout the world. “Anton Chekhov wrote his major plays from 1894 until his death in 1904—that is, precisely during the cinema’s first decade. He never wrote for the screen, though it is tempting to imagine what his films would have been like. With his skill at charting subtle changes in relationships and emotions, the new conception of acting his works required, and the importance he placed on memories determining actions, the resources of the new medium may have been a perfect fit for Chekhov’s artistry.”—Richard Pena, Film Society of Lincoln Center.

This year also marks the 10th anniversary of Seagull Films, which during the last decade has brought American audiences great Russian cinema of all kinds, and is named after Chekhov’s famous play “The Seagull.” CELEBRATING CHEKHOV is a presentation of Seagull Films in collaboration with the National Gallery of Art and Mosfilm Cinema Concern. Special thanks to Alla Verlotsky and Karen Shakhnazarov.



^ Top



^ Top



^ Top


   
© 2009-2017 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development