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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Frontier Justice

Socrates once observed: “Nothing is to be preferred before justice.” However, the quality of justice is not an absolute—it is a human concept and therefore flawed by subjectivity. Some of cinema’s greatest works deal with characters attempting to break free of, or tame, imperfect systems: noble loners and misguided outlaws choosing to stand alone in the face of near-impossible odds, ready to fight for what they believe in. Spanning familiar genres—Western, science fiction, police thriller, and indie-cult—these classic films examine, through the lens of moral predicament, the nature of justice and the ultimate cost of pursuing it.



Fri, Mar 12, 2010
at 7 PM

EASY RIDER
DIRECTOR: DENNIS HOPPER
US, 1969

For many of its generation, EASY RIDER captured the aimlessness, restlessness, and nonconformity that typified the spirit of the times. On a cross-country trip to discover, or perhaps redefine, America, bikers Wyatt (Peter Fonda) and Billy (Dennis Hopper) soon find that their carefree lifestyle is a point of contention for the more orthodox “native” citizens they encounter. EASY RIDER is famed for its soundtrack, which includes Hendrix, Dylan, and The Byrds to name a few; it was also the movie that made Jack Nicholson a star.

( 95 min )

SEE THE TRAILER


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Sat, Mar 13, 2010
at 7 PM

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT
DIRECTOR: NORMAN JEWISON
US, 1967

“In the middle of a sleepless Mississippi night, a patrolman (Warren Oates) finds a stiff of no little importance: it is (or was) the wealthy industrialist whose new factory was going to put the small town of Sparta on the map. His widow (Lee Grant) puts it on the line to Gillespie (Rod Steiger), the local police chief: no culprit, no factory. But coming up with a suspect is more than this bulldog, adept at keeping blacks in their place and little else, can handle.  Enter Tabs (Sidney Poitier), a Philadelphia homicide expert who proceeds to undermine Gillespie, dizzyingly, putting him in his place with a brilliant plan of attack.”—Pacific Film Archive.

( 109 min )

SEE THE TRAILER


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Sun, Mar 14, 2010
at 7 PM

ON THE WATERFRONT
DIRECTOR: ELIA KAZAN
US, 1954

Kazan and screenwriter Budd Schulberg’s unacknowledged apologia for their participation as “friendly witnesses” at the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) hearings, ON THE WATERFRONT is a blunt portrayal of life on New York’s docks and the role of gangsters in the union. Marlon Brando is ex-boxer Terry Malloy, who must choose whether or not to become a “stool pigeon.” Shot with stark realism by Boris Kaufman, this gritty depiction of power and extortion creates a potent allegory for the times, and is brought to life with a superb cast.

( 108 min )

SEE THE TRAILER


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Fri, Mar 19, 2010
at 7 PM

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
DIRECTOR: STANLEY KUBRICK
US/GREAT BRITAIN, 1968

Whether interpreted as a liberating spiritual journey, a philosophical meditation, or an outright condemnation of the nature of mankind, 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY remains a cinematic milestone. Kubrick collaborated with respected science-fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke to articulate a futuristic vision of human experience that spans the millennia. With groundbreaking visual effects, a haunting musical score by György Ligeti, and sublimated performances by Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, and Douglas Rain as the voice of HAL 9000, Kubrick explores the evolution of man’s relationship to his machines.

( 141 min )

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Sat, Mar 20, 2010
at 7 PM

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
DIRECTOR: JOHN STURGES
US, 1960

When a gang of scavenging, bloodthirsty outlaws threatens a small peasant village, guns-for-hire Chris and Vin (Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen) are recruited to gather a team of worthy triggermen to mount a defense. Boldly drawing on Akira Kurosawa’s revered masterpiece THE SEVEN SAMURAI, Sturges transforms the traditional Western into the perfect vessel for Kurosawa’s themes of honor and savagery, played out in suitably tense action set pieces. Co-starring Eli Wallach, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn, and James Coburn.

( 128 min )

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Sun, Mar 21, 2010
at 7 PM

12 ANGRY MEN
DIRECTOR: SIDNEY LUMET
US, 1957

Ed Begley, E.G. Marshall, Jack Klugman, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam, and Lee J. Cobb are part of a jury. Henry Fonda is desperately trying to convince them not to go for the obvious verdict in the murder trial of a young boy. The jury holds the life of the accused in one hand, and a responsibility to the victim in the other. Whom will justice serve? The camera never leaves the jury room in one of the best realist films of the 1950s.

( 96 min )

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Fri, Mar 26, 2010
at 7 PM

RED RIVER
DIRECTOR: HOWARD HAWKES
US, 1948

Howard Hawkes created a metaphor for expansionist greed in this epic drama of one man’s relentless search for command of the environment. John Wayne stars as the cattle baron who turns a vast area of wasteland into a beef empire, only to find himself stymied by the untenable frontier. His push to get his cattle to market in Missouri causes friction in his personal relationships and ultimately precipitates a clash with his son, played by Montgomery Clift in his first screen role.

( 133 min )

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Sat, Mar 27, 2010
at 7 PM

DELIVERANCE
DIRECTOR: JOHN BOORMAN
US, 1972

James Dickey’s novel about four Southern businessmen who get more than they bargained for on a weekend canoe trip is given disarmingly powerful treatment in Boorman’s film. Exploring man’s inhumanity to man in a context of wild nature, he exacts excellent performances from Burt Reynolds and Jon Voight, not to mention two of the most terrifying villains in screen history, Billy McKinney and Herbert “Cowboy” Coward. “A magnificent visual experience and an assault on the senses fully as brutal as the river trip.”—Time Magazine.

( 110 min )

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Sun, Mar 28, 2010
at 7 PM

BONNIE AND CLYDE
DIRECTOR: ARTHUR PENN
US, 1967

Rich with opposing moods and forces—comic and brutal, realistic and fanciful, simple and complex—Penn’s legendary film features winsome performances by Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, Estelle Parsons, Michael J. Pollard, and Gene Hackman. Together they rhapsodize the Barrow Gang—a bumbling bunch of real-life bank robbers that terrorized the rural South in the 1930s, gaining an unlikely public following as well as the fury of the law.

( 112 min )

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