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VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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New Films on Art


DAMIEN HIRST: ADDICTED TO ART
DIRECTOR: LUCY ALLEN
GREAT BRITAIN
When a small proportion of Damien Hirst's art collection went on display at the Serpentine Gallery in London, the South Bank Show's Melvyn Bragg profiled the artist as a collector and businessman—rather than as the enfant terrible of the British art world, as he has also been known. Hirst was the main catalyst and front man for the vibrant Brit Art scene of 1990s, but his interests have always stretched far beyond producing art. His entrepreneurialism made him a global brand, and the controller of an expanding business empire worth hundreds of millions. One of Hirst's motivations for his growing art collection is Toddington, a dilapidated Gothic manor house in Gloucestershire which he purchased in 2005, and which he hopes will one day become a museum for his entire collection. Buying art, Hirst confesses, is "an addiction." With contributions from artists Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas, and Jeff Koons, all of whose works figure in the Hirst collection. ( 48 min )


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CONVERSATION WITH JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT
DIRECTOR: TAMARA DAVIS
US
One of the last interviews with Basquiat features some of the only footage of the artist painting in his studio. ( 22 min )


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ELLSWORTH KELLY: FRAGMENTS
DIRECTOR: EDGAR B. HOWARD AND TOM PIPER
US

Ellsworth Kelly is widely regarded as one of the most important visual artists working today. His work has stressed the connection between abstraction and nature, from which he extrapolates pure forms and colors in a gesture-free spatial unity. Howard and Piper follow Kelly as he revisits the Paris of his twenties—a seminal period in the artist's career—uncovering the influences that became leitmotifs which he has reiterated, refined and reworked for decades. Insightful commentary from scholars and critics, including Robert Storr (Dean, Yale School of Art), Anne d'Harnoncourt (Director, Philadelphia Museum of Art), Alfred Pacquement (Director, Centre Georges Pompidou) and Ann Temkin (Curator, MoMA), round out this portrait of one of the true giants of American art.

( 67 min )
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Thu, Mar 5, 2009
at 7 PM

GUEST OF CINDY SHERMAN
DIRECTOR: PAUL HASEGAWA-OVERACKER, TOM DONAHUE
US

Paul Hasegawa-Overacker became an influential chronicler of the New York art scene in the 1990s with his cheeky cable access show "Gallery Beat." One of the artists he invited for a series of exclusive interviews was the soon-to-be-famous Cindy Sherman. During the course of their sessions, which form the core of GUEST, Hasegawa-Overacker not only gained unique insight into her artistic process, but also developed a romantic attachment to her, subsequently becoming fraught with anxiety over losing himself in his role as Cindy's "plus one" at the celebrity-studded events she regularly attended. Filmed over the course of 15 years and including interviews with a range of artists and critics of the era (Roberta Smith, Ingrid Sischy, John Waters, Robert Longo, David and Eric Fischl among others), GUEST paints a vivid picture of a scene increasingly driven by money and fame.

( 88 min )
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Sun, Mar 8, 2009
at 4:30 PM

BIRD'S NEST—HERZOG & DE MEURON IN CHINA
DIRECTOR: CHRISTOPH SCHAUB, MICHAEL SCHINDELM
GERMANY
Their goal was to create a massive 91,000-seat stadium in the heart of Beijing that would be a new kind of public space—"anti-monumental, a building for the people"—that would endure long after the Olympic torch was extinguished. The Chinese people nicknamed the stadium "Bird's Nest" early on; by naming it, they adopted it as their own. Schaub and Schindelm's film follows star Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron (London's Tate Modern, the Barcelona Forum, de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco) as they literally and metaphorically build bridges between two cultures, two architectural traditions, and two political systems. The stadium, as well as their design for a new city district in Jinhua, reveals that the architects found solutions not in the comfort of the theoretical, but in cultural encounter. "Not only exciting architectural insights, but also a view of the Chinese mood in times of rapid transition."—NZZ. ( 88 min )


Sponsored by the Architecture Foundation of Oregon.
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Wed, Mar 11, 2009
at 7 PM

RICHARD SERRA: THINKING ON YOUR FEET
DIRECTOR: MARIA ANNA TAPPEINER
GERMANY
Richard Serra's monumental steel sculptures are among the defining works of art of our time. In this elegant film portrait, Serra is wonderfully articulate, whether talking about his early paintings, Brancusi's influence, the historical context in which his work developed, or the public controversies and even hostility his art has engendered. He elucidates how "matter imposes form on form," and how a space may move simultaneously in two directions—with a lexicon that includes gravitational vectors, open and closed volume, tectonics, conical sections and torquing ellipses. An installation of several immensely heavy steel plates (40 tons each) at the Bilbao Museum highlights this fascinating account of the art world's man of steel. "At the dawn of the 21st century, an era of cyberspace, reproduction, and the Internet, no one is doing more to make work that stands for the ancient and mysterious power of the real."—Time Magazine. ( 94 min )


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Sat, Mar 14, 2009
at 4 PM

MILTON GLASER: TO INFORM AND DELIGHT
DIRECTOR: WENDY KEYS
US

Perhaps America's most celebrated graphic designer, Milton Glaser is best known for co-founding New York Magazine and the enduring I Heart NY campaign. First-time filmmaker Wendy Keys' affectionate portrait surveys the breadth of Glaser's astounding range of work, which includes newspaper and magazine designs; logos and brand identities; interior spaces; and much-celebrated prints, drawings, posters, and paintings. As it glances into everyday moments of Glaser's personal life and captures his warmth and humanity, the boundless depth of his creativity startles.

( 114 min )
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Tue, Mar 17, 2009
at 7 PM

ANDRES SERRANO
DIRECTOR: ADAM KAHAN
US
In the late 1980s, American artist Andres Serrano (b. 1950) became both famous and infamous almost overnight when his controversial photograph "Piss Christ" drew attacks from the U.S. Congress and the Christian Right. Some consider this period to be the beginning of the "politically correct" movement. Almost twenty years later, Serrano's work continues to elicit extreme reactions. At a recent exhibition in Sweden, vandals attacked the artist's work with pick axes. From his formative years in New York to his retrospectives in Avignon and Paris (where he was commissioned to photograph the members of the Comédie-Française, France's oldest theatre troupe), Serrano has proven to be an artist undaunted by controversy. ( 27 min )


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Sat, Mar 21, 2009
at 3 PM

BY THE WAYS: A JOURNEY WITH WILLIAM EGGLESTON
DIRECTOR: VINCENT GÉRARD, CÉDRIC LATY
FRANCE

Born in 1939 in Memphis, where he now lives and works, William Eggleston grew up on a cotton plantation in Mississippi. Since the early 1960s, Eggleston has captured his everyday environment, indiscriminately and non-hierarchically, first in black-and-white and then in color photographs. All subjects are worthy of his interest: he is unrivaled when it comes to capturing the complexity and beauty of daily life. In 1976 his retrospective of color photographs at MoMA marked a milestone in a photographic history in which black-and-white images were art and color, commerce. The directors follow Eggleston over several months—from the streets of Memphis to Rome, New York, New Orleans, and Arles—building an incremental portrait of the world as seen through the artist's eyes.

( 80 min )

Sponsored by Newspace Center for Photography.


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Sun, Mar 22, 2009
at 4:30 PM

THE UNIVERSE OF KEITH HARING
DIRECTOR: CHRISTINA CLAUSEN
US

The creator of some of the most popular and enduring images of late 20th century art, Keith Haring was also an iconic figure of the downtown New York scene in the 1980s, a cultural ferment infused with graffiti, hip hop, and the AIDS crisis. Clausen's vivid film offers an affectionate, deeply personal glimpse into Haring's life, from his early years growing up in a small, conservative Pennsylvania town to his heyday as a world-renowned artist rubbing shoulders with the likes of Madonna, Basquiat, and Warhol. In less than ten years of feverish activity, Haring produced a prodigious output that lived up to his motto, "Art is for everyone!", with work that ranged from explicit raunch to church murals, from museum environs to playground walls to body art, all imprinted with one of the most dazzling and distinctive styles of any modern artist.

( 90 min )
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Wed, Mar 25, 2009
at 7 PM

ROY LICHTENSTEIN: TOKYO BRUSHSTROKES
DIRECTOR: MARK TROTTENBERG
US

Pop master Roy Lichtenstein, who drew inspiration from cartoons and advertising to produce some of the most indelible images in contemporary painting, became intrigued by a certain brushstroke he saw in a cartoon, deciding it was a "symbol" of painting. He started "brushstroke paintings" in 1965, and then in the 1980s embarked on a series of "monumental brushstroke sculptures," which have become public works in Paris, Barcelona, Tokyo, and Portland. We see Lichtenstein start from a collection of brushstrokes he created for collages, selecting images, making models, meeting with a Japanese architect and curator, enlarging the drawings to some thirty feet, fabricating the sculptures in a foundry, and finally, installing the sculptures in Tokyo where all the work of preparation gives way to the mystery of creation.

( 30 min )
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Sat, Mar 28, 2009
at 2 PM

Sun, Mar 29, 2009
at 4:30 PM

HERB AND DOROTHY
DIRECTOR: MEGUMI SASAKI
US

Two of the best-known, and certainly the most unusual, collectors on the contemporary art scene are Dorothy and Herb Vogel, who put together one of the largest and most important private collections of minimalist and conceptual art in the world. Limited to their modest salaries as librarian and postal worker, they followed their three cardinal rules of art acquisition: they bought what they liked, what they could afford, and what could fit into their low-ceilinged, one-bedroom, rent-controlled Manhattan apartment. In an age of the commodification of art by wealthy "investors," Herb and Dorothy offer a rare and uplifting example of people for whom art is about love, not profit. Over five decades the couple have collected 4,000+ works of art (valued in the millions), and developed close friendships with numerous artists—Sol LeWitt, Robert and Sylvia Mangold, Richard Tuttle, Chuck Close, Pat Steir, Lucio Pozzi, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, among many others—all of whom speak thoughtfully and fondly of these passionate patrons. The Portland Art Museum is one of 50 Museums in 50 states receiving a selection of 50 works from their collection.

( 91 min )
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Sat, Apr 4, 2009
at 4 PM

ALICE NEEL
DIRECTOR: ANDREW NEEL
US
Portrait painter Alice Neel (1900-1984) was a self-described collector of souls. Through six decades she recorded her sitters on canvas, among them Andy Warhol, Bella Abzug, Allen Ginsberg, and Annie Sprinkle. Neel always sought the "authentic," moving from Greenwich Village to Spanish Harlem just as the Village was gaining reputation in the art scene. She sacrificed almost everything for her art, delving so far into the psyches of her sitters that she would almost lose herself. Filmmaker Andrew Neel, Alice Neel's grandson, puts together the pieces of the painter's life. Using personal archival video and intimate one-on-one interviews with Neel's surviving family members, he captures her struggles as a female artist, a single mother, and a painter who defied convention. "A stunning portrait of perhaps the most gifted, cutting edge, raunchy, and defiant female artist of modern times."—TIME OUT. ( 81 min )


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