Newsroom
Calendar
   
ABOUT US
SUPPORT US
SPONSORS
PORTLAND ART MUSEUM

eNewsletter Sign-Up

Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
Schedule Archives
Festivals Archive

2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
The Films of Andrzej Wajda

In 2000, at age seventy-four, Andrzej Wajda was presented with an honorary Academy Award for his contribution to cinema; yet the man who has been called the most influential Polish filmmaker of all time, and the father of the Polish Film School, is little known here in the United States. The marrow of Wajda's life and art was forged by his experiences growing up in Poland during and after World War II. This dark period in his life has sustained fifty-eight years of cinematic inquiry, from his first three features ("THE WAR TRILOGY"), which examine Polish life under Nazi occupation and Soviet domination, to his most recent work, the Polish Oscar submission KATYN (2007), a deeply personal chronicle of the murder of thousands of Polish prisoners of war, including Wajda's own father. "The good Lord gave the director two eyes—one to look into the camera, the other to be alert to everything that is going on around him."—Andrzej Wajda.

Support for this program from the Polish Cultural Institute of New York City, the Polish National Film Archive and the Polish Film Institute. Special thanks to Polish Television and the Film Society of Lincoln Center. All photos are courtesy of Polish Television.



Wed, Feb 18, 2009
at 7 PM

KATYN
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

We open the series with Andrzej Wajda's most recent film, screening in this year's 32nd Portland International Film Festival (February 5-22). Following the Soviet Union's invasion of Poland in 1939, nearly 15,000 Polish army officers, police, gendarmes, and civilians were taken prisoner by the Red Army and executed at three different sites, the most famous of which was Katyn Forest. In 1943 the Germans announced the discovery of the Katyn graves. The Soviets denied the killings, fabricating evidence that blamed the Germans. In Communist Poland, asserting the truth about Katyn resulted in persecution by the Secret Police. KATYN does not tell the story of the massacre, but rather of the families that had to live with both the pain of the crime and the Soviets' lies. Weaving together several of the victims' stories, KATYN is the culmination of Wajda's lifelong wish to make a film on a most personal subject: his father was one of those murdered at Katyn. "You could go in knowing nothing of the massacre and come out wanting to know everything."—The New Yorker.

( 120 min )

This year's Polish submission for the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar.

KATYN is showing as part of the 32nd Portland International Film Festival. Tickets go on sale January 28.


^ Top

Fri, Mar 6, 2009
at 7 PM

A GENERATION
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND
Wajda's first feature launched one of the most durable careers in world cinema. Barely out of film school, Wajda demonstrated a remarkable mastery of the medium: he vividly captured the 1942 Warsaw milieu in which he'd fought as a teenager against the Nazis; introduced the legendary Zbigniew Cybulski and another young film student, Roman Polanski; made a startling break with the traditional theatricality of Polish screen acting; and created what would become part one of his classic war trilogy. The film contrasts official reports of wartime heroics with cruel reality, an interesting foreshadowing (though from a very different perspective) of Wajda's rendition of living with a lie in his latest film, KATYN. ( 83 min )


Sponsored by the Polish Library Building Association.
^ Top

Sun, Mar 8, 2009
at 7 PM

KANAL
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

An unforgettably vivid depiction of the last days of the 1944 Warsaw uprising against the German Nazis, KANAL was co-awarded (with Bergman's THE SEVENTH SEAL) a special jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival, establishing Wajda as a major new international film talent. His second film—and the second part of his war trilogy—features a rich mosaic of meticulously combined narratives, following a band of surviving Polish Home Army soldiers that takes to the sewers to avoid capture. Unable to refer to the fact that the Soviet Army was waiting just across the river while the Germans wiped out the non-Communist resistance, Wajda portrayed the insurgents with unaccustomed sympathy. Five years after this riveting excursion into the "underneath" of history, the Polish Communist Party announced that there was no place for films like Wajda's in Polish cinema. "Sensational filmmaking meets existential masterpiece."—J. Hoberman, The Village Voice.

( 95 min )
^ Top

Fri, Mar 13, 2009
at 7 PM

ASHES AND DIAMONDS
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

The extraordinary final installment in Wajda's war trilogy, ASHES AND DIAMONDS is a true landmark of postwar European cinema. With a screenplay by Jerzy Andrzejewski, based on his novel, the film is set on the last day of the war and the first day of peace, when a young Home Army soldier is assigned to assassinate a Communist official. More important than the political nuances of a Poland poised between past and future are the moral dilemmas faced by individuals in a time of transition, always treated with great humanity by Wajda. Zbigniew Cybulski's way-cool performance—complete with dark shades, match cocked between his teeth and easy banter with the ladies—earned him the title "the James Dean of Poland." "Many consider it the director's best picture; if you're curious about his work, this is an excellent place to start."—Time Out New York.

( 102 min )

Critic's Prize, Venice Film Festival.


^ Top

Sun, Mar 15, 2009
at 7 PM

LANDSCAPE AFTER BATTLE
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

LANDSCAPE opens with one of the most celebrated sequences in Wajda's work: liberated by the arrival of American troops, the prisoners in a concentration camp stream out of their confines, smash the windows of their barracks, strip and throw their striped uniforms into a roaring fire. Those moments of unimaginable freedom quickly lead to the realization that most have nowhere to go. Their former prison becomes their "displaced persons" camp. Tadeusz (Daniel Olbrychski), an intellectual whose main interest is recovering his books, feels as alienated from his fellow prisoners as he did from his captors. But then he forms a tenuous bond with Nina (Stanislawa Celinska), a young Jewish woman who lost everything and everyone in the war. A poignant, deeply affecting portrait of a world in which displacement has become the natural human condition.

( 106 min )
^ Top

Fri, Mar 20, 2009
at 7 PM

EVERYTHING FOR SALE
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

One evening in 1967, Wajda discussed with a friend what a wonderful movie could be made about the life of actor Zbigniew Cybulski. That very night, Cybulski died attempting to jump onto a moving train. The loss was extraordinarily painful for Wajda. Together with a group of close collaborators, he embarked on this deeply personal and introspective film about the cast and crew of a work-in-progress that suddenly loses its leading actor. Top stars (including Elzbieta Czyzewska and Daniel Olbrychski) play themselves, and the prominent actor Andrzej Lapicki plays Wajda. The first of his films to be based on his own original screenplay, EVERYTHING FOR SALE maps the shifting borders of art and life, illusion and reality, grief and creation.

( 97 min )
^ Top

Sun, Mar 22, 2009
at 7 PM

MAIDS OF WILKO
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

After a string of hard-hitting political works that roused the censors' ire and brought him into the international spotlight, Wajda deliberately changed pace with this wistful, elegiac, almost Chekhovian recreation of a long-vanished Poland, based on a story by Jaroslaw Iwaszkiewicz. Following the death of a close friend, 40-year-old farm manager Wiktor (Daniel Olbrychski) returns to the village where he spent his youth. Next door, five sisters Wiktor had known have also returned for the summer. The inviting tranquility of the women's lazy summer days can't conceal the sense of sadness that runs through their lives. Wiktor had loved their sister who, unbeknownst to him, has died, and his presence upsets their delicate emotional balance. "You can't go home again" seems to be Wajda's message, as Wiktor's attempt to revisit his youth revives a web of subtle entanglements from which he is forced to escape.

( 121 min )
^ Top

Fri, Mar 27, 2009
at 7 PM

MAN OF MARBLE
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND

Rarely have a film and a social movement so perfectly meshed as MAN OF MARBLE and the workers' union Solidarity: the film came to be seen as the union's international herald. Young filmmaker Agnieszka (Krystyna Janda) explores the life of Mateusz Birkut (Jerzy Radzilowicz), a now-discredited labor hero of the '50s who is remembered only through the statues made of him, which now reside in cellars and storage lockers. Using cleverly created newsreels, interviews, and scenes of Agnieszka's battles with the authorities, Wajda creates a scathing dissection of the "man of marble" and the state that makes and breaks him. The Communist Party was so nervous about the film that they arranged for only party members to attend the premiere, lest there be any applause at the end. "May be Mr. Wajda's masterpiece."—The New York Times.

( 165 min )
^ Top

Sun, Mar 29, 2009
at 7 PM

DANTON
DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ WAJDA
POLAND
Shot in Paris after the December 1981 imposition of martial law made filming in Poland impossible, Wajda's dramatization of the French Revolution was criticized in France for taking too many liberties with the historical record. In Poland, its penetrating analysis of the consequences of pure revolutionary idealism struck a powerful chord, aided immensely by Gérard Depardieu's towering performance. "Before we began filming in Paris, while Solidarity was still functioning in Poland, Gérard Depardieu came to Warsaw for one day to see the revolution, and especially to see its leaders at the moment just before the collapse of their undertaking. I wanted Depardieu to see the face of Revolution—inhumanly tired, with eyes wide open, suddenly falling asleep but never fully sleeping."—Andrzej Wajda. "Brilliant filmmaking—a controlled tumult of painterly compositions and sensational performances, one of the most gripping revolutionary thrillers I've ever seen."—Andrew Sarris, Village Voice. ( 130 min )


^ Top


   
© 2009-2017 NWFilmCenter  |  home  |  location  |  contact  |  info@nwfilm.org  |  p: 503-221-1156 A-VIBE Web Development