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Silver Screen Club


VENUES AND TICKETS
Whitsell Auditorium
1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

The Box Office opens 30 minutes prior to showtime.

PARKING

ADMISSION PRICES
$9 General
$8 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$6 Friends of the Film Center

Tickets are now available online. Click on the 'Buy Tickets' links to buy online.

BOOK OF TEN TICKETS
$50 Buy Here

THE 10-MINUTE RULE
Seats for advance ticket and pass holders are held until 10 minutes before showtime, when any unfilled seats are released to the public. Thus, advance tickets or passes ensure that you will not have to wait in the ticket purchase line but do not guarantee a seat in the case of arrival after the 10-minute window has begun. Your early arrival also helps get screenings started promptly. We appreciate your understanding. Advance ticket holders who arrive within the 10-minute window but are not seated may exchange their tickets for another screening at the Ticket Outlet or obtain a cash refund at the theater. There are no refunds or exchanges for late arrivals or for missed screenings.



   
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2016
Volume 1

2015
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2014
Volume 6
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2013
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2012
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2011
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2010
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2009
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2008
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2007
Volume 7
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 1

2006
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 2
Volume 1

2005
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2004
Volume 6
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2003
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2002
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2001
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

2000
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1999
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
Volume 2
Volume 1

1998
Volume 5
Volume 4
Volume 3
It Don't Worry Me:
A Tribute to Robert Altman
In a career that spanned five decades, Robert Altman (1925 – 2006) left no genre untouched Scorning the emotional dishonesty of typical Hollywood formula pictures, he aggressively sought to subvert, innovate and reinvent the very boundaries of filmmaking. Ever the cinema's malcontent, Altman employed unorthodox methods such as overlapping dialogue, semi-improvisatory techniques, and documentary style camera work to realize his now-trademark vision of cinematic verisimilitude.



Fri, Mar 7, 2008
at 7 PM

MASH
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
M*A*S*H depicts the madcap hijinks of a few rebellious army surgeons during the Korean war, however, the thinly veiled jabs it took at the more pressing Vietnam conflict made it a world wide hit with audiences and critics alike. Simultaneously hilarious and horrific, the film employs Altman's characteristic style to lambaste authority while celebrating the surreal. The fine ensemble cast features Elliot Gould, Donald Sutherland, Robert Duvall, Tom Skerritt, and more. "Altman's black comedy perfectly expressed the anarchic, rebellious spirit of the 1970s with its blistering anti-war message and contempt for authority."–Neil Smith, BBC. ( 116 min )


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Sat, Mar 8, 2008
at 7 PM

BREWSTER MCCLOUD
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
Following hot on the heels of the enormously successful M*A*S*H, BREWSTER MCCLOUD, with its deliberately faltering beginning and wandering narrative line, seems determined to be different. It tells the story of a boy (Bud Cort) who yearns to fly. Hiding out in the Houston Astrodome, under the mentorship of a bird-woman (Sally Kellerman), he builds a pair of life-size wings. Brewster's world is disrupted, however, by the arrival of a San Francisco detective investigating the cases of several guano-covered corpses. Altman parodies such films as THE BIRDS, BULLITT and THE WIZARD OF OZ (the Wicked Witch herself, Margaret Hamilton, stars in a minor role), while also exploring a young boy's dreams of freedom and flight in the sociopolitical bounds of Nixon's America. ( 104 min )


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Sun, Mar 9, 2008
at 7:30 PM

KANSAS CITY
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
Altman's ode to the Kansas City of 1934 depicts a society virtually untouched by the Depression, one in which prosperity is achieved by bringing the underground—gambling, liquor, prostitution, crime, political warmongering—above ground. In this volatile setting, in one 24-hour period, the local crime boss (Harry Belafonte) kidnaps a petty thief (Dermot Mulroney) who tried to swindle him, and in response, the thief's wife (Jennifer Jason Leigh) kidnaps the drug-addicted wife (Miranda Richardson) of a presidential advisor in order to swap hostages. Jazz music permeates the film, providing its background and many of its most memorable characters. Altman, a Kansas City native, injects the storyline with local flavor and 1930s pop culture references, with the result that many critics have called the film a "personal memory work" unique in the Altman oeuvre. ( 116 min )


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Fri, Mar 14, 2008
at 7 PM

GOSFORD PARK
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
A shooting party, comprised of wealthy Britons and Americans and their respective entourages, assembles for the weekend on the English estate of Sir William McCordle. When a murder occurs in the middle of the night, an investigation ensues which is complicated by the fact that half of the guests and residents had sufficient motive to commit the crime. The story, told from the perspective of the servants, utilizes the familiar format of the whodunit to explore the complexities, hypocrisies, and delicious snobberies of the British class system. The film was the last of Altman's five Oscar nominations for Best Director, which he never won. ( 137 min )


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Sat, Mar 15, 2008
at 7 PM

THE PLAYER
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
Tim Robbins stars as big-shot movie exec Griffin Mills, an A-List Hollywood producer who may be at the end of his golden streak. When his apathetic attitude towards screenwriters catches up with him in the form of the very disgruntled and possibly murderous David Kahane (Vincent D'Onofrio), Mills begins to believe that his fate is being orchestrated by his rival: the up-and-coming producer Larry Levy (Peter Gallagher). One of Altman's best films, THE PLAYER finds the director poking a stick directly in the eye of the industry and sparing none of the players—least of all himself. "Altman loves practical jokes, and THE PLAYER is his craftiest prank, his jolly last laugh."–Hal Hinson, WASHINGTON POST. ( 123 min )


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Sun, Mar 16, 2008
at 7 PM

JAZZ '34
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
A companion film to KANSAS CITY, JAZZ '34 is a recreation of the jazz scene of 1934 Kansas City, a town that, like Chicago to the north, was the center of a thriving music culture in the 1920s and 1930s. Rather than following a typical plotline, JAZZ '34 features an ensemble of stellar contemporary jazz artists (Joshua Redman and Don Byron among many) on the KANSAS CITY film set, performing the music of the early jazz greats in 1930s Kansas City style—including a reenactment of the real-life "battle of the saxes" between famed tenor saxophonists Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young. The result is a rich collage of 1930s jazz culture and swing—Kansas City style. ( 72 min )


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Fri, Mar 21, 2008
at 7 PM

BUFFALO BILL AND THE INDIANS
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
With his hugely popular Wild West Show, Buffalo Bill Cody (Paul Newman) has achieved legendary status as a hunter, scout, and Indian fighter. But in reality, Cody wears a wig, can no longer shoot straight, and rigs his well-choreographed battles so that he is always the victor. But so blurred is the line between performance and reality that Cody himself believes in the persona he has created. Capitalizing on the opportunity provided by the American bicentennial, Altman lambastes the American myth of heroism and transforms a revisionist western into a sly commentary on show business. ( 123 min )


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Sat, Mar 22, 2008
at 7 PM

MCCABE & MRS MILLER
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
Suspicious of the emotional falsehood inherent in most Hollywood genre films, Altman subverts the hyperbole of the typical western with MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER. Warren Beatty and Julie Christie star as the title characters, one a hopeful entrepreneur, the other an opium-addicted courtesan, both newly arrived to a burgeoning mining camp in the Pacific Northwest. After McCabe turns down a potentially lucrative business proposition, the sanctity of the settlement is forever altered. Featuring songs by Leonard Cohen and lush cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond, MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER is one of Altman's most beautifully realized films. ( 121 min )


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Sun, Mar 23, 2008
at 7 PM

A WEDDING
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
Two wealthy families—one, conservative Southern "new money," the other with ties to the Mafia—are brought together by the marriage of their children, but not everything is golden on this happy occasion. The senile bishop flubs his ceremonial speech, the groom's grandmother drops dead, parents are exposed as drunks and drug addicts, and the bride's sister is revealed to be pregnant by the groom. In this irreverent black comedy, Altman turns his trademark iconoclasm on the institution of marriage and indulges his predilection for myriad characters and multiple, overlapping plot lines. ( 125 min )


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Fri, Mar 28, 2008
at 7 PM

THIEVES LIKE US
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
Bowie (Keith Carradine), a country boy from Mississippi serving a life sentence for murder, escapes from prison with two slow-witted fellow inmates (John Schuck and Bert Remsen) who share their expertise as bank robbers to show Bowie how to survive on the lam. As Bowie falls into more and more trouble with his new gang, he also falls in love with a young girl named Keechie (Shelley Duvall) whose father owns the gas station in which the convicts hide out. Though the film is clearly a nod to Arthur Penn's BONNIE AND CLYDE, Altman's Depression-era world is gritty, slow, and simplistic rather than slick, his characters more human than heroic. ( 123 min )


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Sat, Mar 29, 2008
at 7 PM

THE LONG GOODBYE
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
As a tribute to, or perhaps in contempt of, the noir detective story, Altman subverts genre convention by re-imagining the usually hard-boiled character of Philip Marlowe as a nebbish private eye. Elliot Gould plays Marlowe, who digs himself deep into trouble when he decides to investigate the murder of a friend. Based on the book by Raymond Chandler with a screenplay by Altman and Leigh Brackett (THE BIG SLEEP), any vestiges of the tough-guy detective are purposefully sublimated by Gould's unique characterization, making the film one of Altman's most interesting cinematic experiments ( 112 min )


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Sun, Mar 30, 2008
at 7 PM

THREE WOMEN
DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
US
THREE WOMEN is often overlooked in the wider pantheon of Altman films, yet it remains one of his most fascinating. Shelly Duvall was nominated for the Best Actress award at Cannes for her portrayal of Millie Lammoreaux, a happily, and perhaps purposefully, naïve young woman, who meets the shy and introverted Pinky Rose, portrayed by Sissy Spacek. The two women become incidental friends at their mutual workplace and decide to live as roommates. When a desperate turn of events forces a reversal of roles between the two women, the layers of identity and character are slowly peeled back, revealing, or perhaps unraveling, the delicate truth beneath. ( 124 min )


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