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Venues and Tickets

GUILD THEATRE
829 SW 9th Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

WHITSELL AUDITORIUM

1219 SW Park Avenue
Portland, OR 97205

Admission Prices:
$7 General
$6 PAM Members, Students, Seniors
$4 Friends of the Film Center

DOUBLE FEATURE
$2 Additional for second film

[cash or checks only]


Welcome to the Northwest Film Center’s 23rd edition of Reel Music. We hope this year’s lineup is as broad as your musical tastes — jazz, rock, funk, soul, gospel, hip-hop, hillbilly, folk, reggae, country, classical, chazzannut, electronic and the avant-garde — and that you’ll find something that intrigues and animates. Special thanks to The Oregonian and Music Millennium for helping make it happen.
 

PICK UP THE MIC
DIRECTOR: ALEX HINTON
US 2005

JAN 6 FRI 7 PM Guild Theatre

Queer Hip-Hop: it’s a lot more than a stylish oxymoron as Alex Hinton reveals in his surprising film on the world of queer rappers. Featuring searing public performances and raw, revealing interviews with the community’s most significant players, Hinton captures an unapologetic underground music movement just as it explodes into the mainstream - defying the music industry’s most homophobic genre in the process. Featuring more than a dozen contemporary hip-hop artists that represent a striking range of sexual and ethnic diversity, the film traces their intertwining relationships from San Francisco’s underground music scene of the early ‘90s through today. “Call it homohop, if you’d like. . . a community of b-boys and b-girls bent on using the blunt eloquence of pop music’s most pervasive language to express themselves —keeping it real and making it their own.”—TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL. Featuring: Juba Kalamka, Dutchboy, Tori Fixx, Johnny Dangerous, Deadlee, God-Des, JenRo, Katastrophe, Paradigm, QBoy, Tim’m T. West. (94 mins.)
DIRECTOR ALEX HINTON WILL INTRODUCE HIS FILM.

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SAM COOKE: LEGEND
DIRECTOR: PETER GURALNICK
US 2003

JAN 7 SAT 7 PM Guild Theatre

The release of Peter Guralnick’s (“Last Train to Memphis,” “Careless Love”) new biography “Dream Boogie – The Triumph of Sam Cooke,” provides the opportune moment to enjoy his earlier film on the man who invented soul. Cooke went from being the top gospel singer of his day with the Soul Stirrers to pop stardom with “You Send Me,” his very first record under his own name. In addition to classic performance clips, Guralnick surveys Cooke’s innovative business acumen, friendships and influence with personalities as diverse as Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X and the Beatles, and through illuminating interviews with fellow artists Aretha Franklin, Lloyd Price, Bobby Womack, Lou Rawls and family members, captures the talent and drive in a man whose influence continues long after his untimely death in 1964. (70 mins).

 

FOLLOWED BY
PARLIAMENT FUNKADELIC: ONE NATION UNDER A GROOVE
DIRECTOR: YVONNE SMITH
US 2005


Known to its legions of fans simply as P-Funk, Parliament Funkadelic has had a profound impact on the development of contemporary music, aesthetics and culture. Smith traces the evolution of the P-Funk band from their beginnings as a doo-wop barbershop quartet in Newark, to their incarnation as funky extraterrestrials and profound influence on hip-hop music. Along with great performance footage, interviews with the architects-George Clinton, Bootsy Collins and Bernie Worrell-are woven with the comments of other artists-Shock G, Ice Cube, De La Soul, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Rick James-who testify to the unique alchemy of the P-Funk sound. “Funk is fun and it’s a state of mind. But it’s also all the ramifications of that state of mind. Once you do the best you can, funk it.”-George Clinton. (60 mins.)
MAJOR FUNDING FOR THIS PROGRAM WAS PROVIDED BY THE CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING. IT IS A CO-PRODUCTION WITH THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION SERIES IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE NATIONAL BLACK PROGRAMMING CONSORTIUM (NBPC). ADMISSION BY CONTRIBUTION

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SHAKESPEARE WAS A BIG GEORGE JONES FAN:
COWBOY JACK CLEMENT’S HOME MOVIES

DIRECTORS: ROBERT GORDON, MORGAN NEVILLE
US 2005

JAN 8 SUNDAY 7 PM Guild Theatre

Weaving an amalgamation of old home movie footage of country music legends, concert footage, hilarious historical retellings of the rise of Country & Western and the Memphis music scene, and an animated Shakespeare that sounds suspiciously like Johnny Cash, Neville and Gordon’s affectionate portrait explores the life of maverick entrepreneur ‘Cowboy’ Jack Clement, the madcap jester of the country music industry. Clement began working at Sun Records in the 50s, producing 20 gold records for Charley Pride, and going on to produce and write songs for Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton and George Jones among others. Over the years he documented it all on home movies, providing a treasure trove of private moments with public legends, which Gordon and Neville have shaped into a portrait of one of the liveliest characters you can imagine. (58 mins.)

 

WITH
THE HIGHWAYMEN
DIRECTOR: MORGAN NEVILLE
US 2005


They were known as the Highwaymen-—Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson—each legendary in his own right, but together forming a singular super group. Featuring rare footage from the Highwaymen’s final recording sessions in 1994, THE HIGHWAY MEN gives a rare glimpse into the personalities of each, peeling away their “outlaw” personas to reveal four men struggling with their own demons, creativity and mortality. (60 mins.)

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SCOPITONE CLASSICS
VARIOUS DIRECTORS
FRANCE/US 1950S-1960

JAN 11 WED 7 PM Guild Theatre

We welcome film collector and curator Dennis Nyback for an evening of archeological discovery in which camp and kitsch collide. “One of the most fascinating phenomena of the 1960s, the Scopitone was a tall video jukebox with a TV screen on top and a selection of three-minute musical numbers available for the price of a quarter. The concept wasn’t new — there were plenty of “soundies” in the 1940s that used a similar technology — but the content certainly was. Scopitones were invented in France in the late 1950s, but soon became raunchy fixtures in America’s strip joints, tiki bars, and gambling parlors. What could you get for your two bits? How about lounge lizardette Jane Morgan, she of the glamorous overbite, singing “C’est si bon” in a cheesy faux-Paris? Or Stacy Adams and Her Pussycats (who look like local whores) demonstrating the jerk, the monkey, and the twist at a tacky Vegas motel? Or third-generation blonde bombshell Joi Lansing (after Marilyn Monroe and Jayne Mansfield) crooning to a queen in a cobra costume while she’s “cooking” in a jungle cauldron? And let’s not leave out Debbie Reynolds. Along with each song the viewer was treated to a now-hilariously choreographed parade of period pop couture, from Mondrian dresses to string bikinis to vinyl go-go boots.”(90 mins.)

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MALFUNKSHUN-THE ANDREW WOOD STORY
DIRECTOR: SCOT BARBOUR
US 2005

JAN 12 THUR 7 PM Whitsell Auditorium


In 1990, Seattle rock band Mother Love Bone gained national attention when lead singer Andrew Wood died at the age of 24. With infectious optimism, flamboyant stage presence and haunting lyrics, Wood had been a creative force in the Seattle music scene throughout the ‘80s. He fronted his group Malfunkshun in the alter-ego character of “Landrew The Love Child.” He later joined former Green River members (and future Pearl Jam founders) Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament to form Mother Love Bone. Inspired by the tribute album TEMPLE OF THE DOG, director Scot Barbour was compelled to find out all he could about the man. His resulting film explores Wood’s passions, relationships, struggles, music and the great impact he had on others as it sheds light on the ‘80s Seattle music scene. (105 mins.)

PRE-SCREENING: GARY EWINGS “LIGHT AS ART.”

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DERAILROADED
DIRECTOR: JOSH RUBIN
US 2005

JAN 13 FRI 7 PM Whitsell Auditorium

Institutionalized at sixteen after attacking his mother with a knife, Larry “Wild Man” Fischer wandered the mean streets of L.A. singing his totally unique songs to passersby for a dime. Discovered by Frank Zappa, with whom he cut his first record album, Fischer became an underground club and concert favorite, earning the title of “Godfather of Outsider Music.” Over the course of forty years, he appeared on national television (“Laugh-In”), on the top-50 music charts in England, was the subject of his own comic book and was the first artist to be recorded on Rhino Records. (86 mins.)

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HIGH AND DRY: WHERE THE DESERT MEETS ROCK ‘N ROLL
DIRECTOR: MICHAEL TOUBASSI
US 2005

JAN 13 FRI 7 PM Guild Theatre

Like Portland, Seattle, Athens, Austin and other regional music oasis, Tucson has had a fertile alternative rock music scene in the past two decades. After four years of gathering performance tapes, interviews and formulating perspective on its scene, Michael Toubassi reveals an eclectic community of musicians whose struggle for survival at home and on the road rings familiar. HIGH AND DRY pays tribute to an influential and eclectic community of musicians that has emerged from a small town with a big scene, including such stalwarts as Calexico, Bob Log III, Giant Sand, Machines of Loving Grace, Al Perry, Rainer, Sand Rubies, and Supersuckers. (90 mins.)
DIRECTOR MICHAEL TOUBASSI WILL INTRODUCE THE FILM.

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PUNK: ATTITUDE
DIRECTOR: DON LETTS
BRITAIN 2004

JAN 14 SAT 7 PM Guild Theatre

What is punk? Don Letts—filmmaker, London punk scene veteran, infamous DJ at The Roxy and member of Big Audio Dynamite—has created a film that captures the essence of punk rock. Letts includes interviews with more or less everyone who’s still alive who had an impact on the movement that shook the world, including Lou Reed, Tommy Ramone, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Siouxsie, Jello Biafra, Thurston Moore, Henry Rollins, Dick Manitoba, Glenn Branca, Arthur Kane, James Chance and many others. Interspersed with priceless footage of the likes of the MC5, the Sex Pistols, the Clash, the Buzzcocks, the Stooges and Fugazi, this is an intriguing picture of the vision and anger at the status quo, both musically and socially, that was the punk movement.(90 mins.)

 

WITH
THE FALL: THE WONDERFUL, FRIGHTENING WORLD OF MARK E. SMITH
DIRECTOR: DIONNE NEWTON
BRITAIN 2005


One of the most enigmatic and idiosyncratic garage bands of the last 30 years, The Fall is led by the belligerent and poetic Mark E. Smith who, for the first time, has agreed to tell the story of The Fall, he, along with many of the major players, taking us through this unique English rock ‘n roll story. (60 mins.)

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HOMEMADE HILBILLY JAM
DIRECTOR: RICK MINNICH
US 2005

JAN 15 SUN 7 PM Guild Theatre

Rick Minnich’s vibrant film explores the roots of Hillbilly music and culture, which was largely derived from the folk songs imported by Scottish and Irish immigrants to the Ozark Mountains of Missouri. Minnich introduces us to the family, proud to consider themselves hillbillies, who make up the band Big Smith. They combine traditional roots of Scots-Irish jigs, church music and folk songs handed down over generations with more modern elements of country and western and a sensibility they describe as ‘neo-hillbilly’. Tradition-minded too are the Pine Ridge Singers, whose patriarch “Dupe” Brown was born and raised in a log cabin and is determined to keep his land in the family. But times are changing in the Ozarks. Even Big Smith’s former role models, the legendary Mabes, now perform as the Baldknobbers—in stereotypic “hillbilly” garb—for the tourists in Branson. Filled with impromptu jam sessions, archival footage and old photos, HILLBILLY JAM is an evocative postcard from out yonder.(90 mins.)

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SPIDER JOHN KOERNER
DIRECTOR: DON MCGLYNN
US 2005

JAN 19 THURS 7 PM Guild Theatre

Don McGlynn’s excellent documentaries on jazz and blues greats (Charles Mingus, Howlin’ Wolf, Dexter Gordon and Louie Prima) have been highlights of our annual Reel Music series. His latest work is a portrait of Minneapolis folk-blues legend Spider John Koerner. As fellow Minnesotan Bob Dylan confirms, Koerner was not just a crony in the folk scene of the 1950s-60s, but a major inspiration whose influence extended to musicians as diverse as Bonnie Raitt, Beck, the Beatles, the Doors and the Rolling Stones. After emerging as one of the stars of the early ‘60s folk revival (with Dave Ray and Tony Glover), Koerner dedicated himself to strictly traditional folk music and in recent years has arrived at a fascinating mix of blues, folk and cosmic enlightenment. (100 mins.)

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DOO–WOP: THEY ALL SANG ON THE CORNER

JAN 20 FRI 7 PM Guild Theatre

Call it Doo-Wop, “Vocal Group Harmony,” or “The Forgotten Sound of Rock and Roll,” street corner harmony was a dominant sound in the radio airwaves throughout the 1950’s. Although there has been a recent revival of the music represented by numerous CDs, glamorous box sets and even live in person shows bringing back survivors and replacements of the original groups to sing their hits from the past, there is very little surviving footage from that era that shows the groups in their prime. Tonight Portland collector Matt Blender will present a program featuring live film and television performances from the 50s and 60s, including Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers, The 5 Satins, The Larks, The Moonglows, The Clovers, The Del Vikings, The Skyliners, The Coasters and many others. (100 mins.)

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SORCERESS OF THE NEW PIANO
DIRECTOR: EVANS CHAN
US/SINGAPORE/HONG KONG 2004

JAN 21 SAT 7 PM Guild Theatre


Hailed by THE NEW YORKER as “the diva of avant-garde pianism,” Singapore-born, New York-based artist Margaret Leng Tan is one of the most important figures in contemporary music. The first woman to graduate from Julliard, Tan’s life and contributions–her famous toy and prepared pianos—take center stage in Chan’s engrossing film, which invites the viewer to literally get inside her instruments and discover her sublime sonic universe. Tan’s musical lineage traces back to such American pioneers as Henry Cowell, George Crumb and longtime mentor John Cage, irrepressibly channeling their aesthetic provocations into accessible interpretations while continually investigating the East-West cultural intersection. Equally fascinating for avant-garde music buffs and those with no knowledge of the genre, Chan’s film enables us to hear (and see) music where we least expect it. (92 mins.)

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AMAZING GRACE: JEFF BUCKLEY
DIRECTORS: NYLA ADAMS, LAURIE TROMBLEY
US 2004

JAN 21 SAT 9:15 PM Guild Theatre


Jeff Buckley drowned in the Wolf River in Tennessee after releasing only one record, “Amazing Grace,” an album, which has earned near mythic status with Buckley fans throughout the world. Buckley’ striking persona, unforgettable voice, and unique synthesis of musical genres—from cabaret to gospel, folk, soul and rock—touched many, earning him a special place in the pantheon of cult heroes whose voices were cut short too soon. Adams and Trombley interview band members, friends, family and musical colleagues in pursuit of the enigmatic man and his music, perhaps coming as close as one can to capturing the spirit and mystery of a romantic legend. (64 mins.)

 

WITH
IN THE EDGES: THE GRIZZLY SESSIONS
DIRECTOR: ERIK NELSON

US 2005


One of the things that adds to the power of Werner Herzog’s riveting GRIZZY MAN is the lyrical score by guitarist Richard Thompson and collaborators Henry Kaiser and Jim O’Rourke. Nelson’s fascinating film chronicles the creation of the soundtrack for the film, improvised in the studio at Fantasy Records in Berkeley. Working from just clips of various scenes, Herzog’s vision and the musician’s artist impulses combine to evoke a mood for unfolding madness and the epic grandeur of the Alaskan wild. “Werner knew exactly what he wanted; he didn’t necessarily know how to get there. That was our job: to figure out how to arrive at his vision. . .If you rub the edges off music, you really take away the music itself. The music is in the edges; it’s in the rough bits.” —Richard Thompson. (60 mins.)

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A CANTOR’S TALE
DIRECTOR: ERIK GREENBERG ANJOU
US 2004

SUN JAN 22 4 PM Guild Theatre

Great cantors used to be celebrities as adored as athletes and movie stars. Greenberg Anjou’s exhilarating film is a tribute to Chazzanut, the cantorial art, as Jacob (Jack) Mendelson, a cantor with a personality as big as his voice, offers a guided tour of his Brooklyn neighborhood, where, when he was a boy, cantors reigned supreme and music was the air he breathed. A loving tribute to a Golden Age in American Jewish life when people would travel miles to hear dizzying cantillations spilling from the windows of crowded synagogues. “The clips of legendary cantors (both local and European, many of whom died in the Holocaust). . . truly remain thrilling enough to convey why this was truly ‘the popular Jewish music’ for several 20th century decades.”-VARIETY.(90 mins.)

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BEETHOVEN’S HAIR
DIRECTOR: LARRY WEINSTEIN
CANADA/CZECH REPUBLIC 2004

JAN 22 SUN 7 PM Guild Theatre


Based on Russell Martin’s best-selling book, BEETHOVEN’S HAIR traces the amazing journey of a lock cut at his death in 1827 to the unraveling the mystery of his tortured life via futuristic science. The story begins with a pair of Beethoven enthusiasts who purchased the hair at a Sotheby’s auction. Tracing back through the previous generations of owners, the saga of the lock’s survival from 19th century Vienna to the horrors of Nazi Germany is set against the new world of forensic testing. Accompanied by some of the composer’s most glorious music, Weinstein provides both a story of unlikely characters connected across time and place by an unlikely relic and new light on the causes of Beethoven’s deafness, poor health, volatile personality and perhaps even the nature of his great art. (84 mins.)

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AWAKE ZION
DIRECTOR: MONICA HAIM

US 2004

JAN 25 WED 7 PM Guild Theatre

Reggae enthusiast Monica Haim explores similarities between Judaism and reggae culture: the Star of David and the ancient African six-pointed star, Hasidic ear locks and dreadlocks, old Jewish songs that fit into African grooves. Could they be connected? Haim’s film celebrates music and its capacity to unite people of all faiths, featuring reggae artists King Django, Super Dane and Matisyahu. “The film is, in a way, a testament to the ridiculousness of looking at differences all the time and know how closely you are related to other cultures when you would not expect it.”—Monica Haim. (60 mins.)

 

WITH
WEST BANK STORY
DIRECTOR: ARI SANDEL
US 2004


In this witty musical takeoff on WEST SIDE STORY, an Israeli soldier falls for a Palestinian girl. That their families have dueling falafel stands doesn’t help matters. (21 mins.)

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ISN’T THIS A TIME
DIRECTOR: JIM BROWN
US 2004

JAN 26 THUR 7 PM Guild Theatre
JAN 28 SAT 5:15 PM Whitsell Auditorium


In November 2003, “Arlo Guthrie in concert with special guests in a tribute to Harold Leventhal” was held at Carnegie Hall. Over a 50-year career, Leventhal managed some of the leading icons of the folk music scene, his pivotal role evidenced by the artists who performed that day—Pete Seeger, the Weavers, Theodore Bikel, Leon Bibb and Peter, Paul and Mary. Like many Yiddish-speaking Jews who grew up during the Depression, Leventhal believed in the promise of American democracy and developed a passionate commitment to the pursuit of social justice. Finding kindred spirits in folk musicians, he built an audience hungry for a music that reflected progressive social values in a culture suffused by Cold War paranoia and repressive Blacklist tactics. (90 mins.)

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MUSIC IS MY LIFE, POLITICS IS MY MISTRESS
DIRECTOR: DONNIE BETTS
US 2005

JAN 27 FRI 7 PM Whitsell Auditorium


Poet, jazz singer, stage actor, composer, trade union activist, radio host and senatorial candidate, Oscar Brown Jr. (1926-2005) was a self-educated polymath whose voice, both musical and political, reached the empowered and disempowered alike. Long before the wave of outspoken poets, journalists and filmmakers began discussions on the current state of affairs, Brown was singing out to the world on topics that confront not only Black Americans, but all people overlooked and downtrodden by society. Betts’ energizing film takes us on a ride through history and social consciousness with a lively mixture of historical footage, live performances and thought-provoking interviews with Brown, his family, and renowned friends and fans including Al Jarreau Abbey Lincoln, Studs Terkel and Amiri Baraka. (110 mins.)
DONNI BETTS WILL INTRODUCE THE FILM.

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PRESS ON
DIRECTOR: GILLIAN GRISMAN
US 2005

JAN 28 SAT 7 PM Guild Theatre

The steel guitar was popularized in the early 1900s by Hawaiian musicians, and upon its arrival on the mainland, was adopted by country musicians. Less known is that for more than 60 years it has been a part of church communities across the United States. Today, “sacred steel” music is now reaching mainstream audiences around the world via 25-year-old pedal steel guitar virtuoso Robert Randolph. His group, Robert Randolph and the Family Band have emerged from the House of God Church to rock venue and Grammy winning stardom, trying to find a new audience and stay true to their roots. Featuring Sacred Steel virtuosos Ted Beard, Calvin Cooke, The Lee Boys, and the Deerfield Jamboree, as well as musicians Eric Clapton, Dave Matthews, Warren Haynes and The Blind Boys of Alabama. (77 mins.)

 

FOLLOWED BY
IN THE EDGES: THE GRIZZLY SESSIONS
DIRECTOR: ERIK NELSON
US 2005


One of the things that adds to the power of Werner Herzog’s riveting GRIZZY MAN is the lyrical score by guitarist Richard Thompson and collaborators Henry Kaiser and Jim O’Rourke. Nelson’s fascinating film chronicles the creation of the soundtrack for the film, improvised in the studio at Fantasy Records in Berkeley. Working from just clips of various scenes, Herzog’s vision and the musician’s artist impulses combine to evoke a mood for unfolding madness and the epic grandeur of the Alaskan wild. “Werner knew exactly what he wanted; he didn’t necessarily know how to get there. That was our job: to figure out how to arrive at his vision. . .If you rub the edges off music, you really take away the music itself. The music is in the edges; it’s in the rough bits.” —Richard Thompson. (60 mins.)

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PUT A NEEDLE ON THE RECORD
DIRECTOR: JASON REM
US 2004

JAN 28 SAT 9:30 PM Guild Theatre
JAN 29 SUN 7 PM Guild Theatre


A veritable head-spinning ride through dance music culture and history, Jason Rem’s film was shot in March 2003, during the Winter Music Conference in Miami’s South Beach. Featuring DJs such as Christopher Lawrence, Roger Sanchez, Jesse Saunders, Dirty Vegas, DJ Colette, Marques Wyatt, The Crystal Method, Jason Bentley and Charles Feelgood, who tell their tales—from Detroit, to New York to Ibiza—as fans and revelers find their own grooves. (83 mins.)

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DJANGOMANIA!
DIRECTOR: JAIME KASTNER
CANADA 2005

FEB 2 THUR 7 PM Guild Theatre

More than fifty years after his death, Gypsy jazz guitar legend Django Reinhardt inspired legions of musicians. Kastner travels on a sometimes-comic journey to the Django Reinhardt Festival in France, to Hawaii, Oslo and even Tokyo (two dueling Django tribute bands!), finding fans and players enthralled by his music. With archival footage, live performances and bemused observations of modern day Gypsies, this essay will make you want to dig deeper into a remarkable life. (60 mins.)

 

WITH
DAVE HOLLAND
DIRECTOR: ULLI GRUBER
US 2004


One night in 1968, Miles Davis walked into a London club where 20-year old bassist Dave Holland was playing with Joe Henderson. Davis immediately bought him a ticket to New York to join his band, the start of career that has placed Holland at the pinnacle of acoustic bass players, whether as a soloist, or at the helm of his various quintets and big bands. Gruber captures the ups and downs of a remarkable talent, whose most recent accolades include winning Downbeat Magazine’s 2005 Critics Poll for Musician of the Year, Big Band of the Year and Acoustic Bassist of the Year. (23 mins.)

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THE BEST OF MIRRORBALL
DIRECTOR: VARIOUS

FEB 3 FRI 7 PM Guild Theatre
FEB 4 SAT 7 PM Guild Theatre


The Edinburgh Film Festival’s “Mirrorball” programs have showcased the latest in cutting edge music videos from throughout the world. This year’s 10th anniversary featured this special program of outstanding works from the past years, expansive, exploratory, inventive and incendiary works from the intersection of music and film. Included are videos by: Wax/Spike Jonze; Weezer/Sophie Muller; Cibo Matto/Michel Gondry; MC Solaar/Stephane Sedanoui; God Lives Underwater/Roman Coppola; Air/Mike Mills; Blur/Hammer and Tongs; Unkle/Jon Glazer; Quannum/Shynola; Baby Bird/Blue Source; Radiohead/Shynola; Dirty Vegas/Blue Source; The White Stripes/Michel Gondry; Unkle/Shynola; Johnny Cash/Mark Romanek; Audio Bullys/Walter Stern; Faultline/Vernie Yeoung; Chikink/Sutherland; and Charlotte Hatherley/Edgar Wright.(90 mins.)

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LOMAX THE SONGHUNTER
DIRECTOR: ROGIER KAPPERS

NETHERLANDS 2004

FEB 3 FRI 7 PM Whitsell Auditorium
FEB 5 SUN 5 PM Guild Theatre


Alan Lomax (1915-2002) devoted his entire life to recording music in danger of disappearing. For six decades he traveled tirelessly, documenting blues, bluegrass, jazz, Appalachian and Cajun music for the Archive of Folksong at the Library of Congress. Lomax made some of the earliest recordings of Muddy Waters, Memphis Slim, Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson and introduced U.S. audiences to such pivotal figures such as Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. After traversing America he set his sights on the rest of the globe, hauling his primitive recording equipment around remote Scottish islands and Spanish mountain villages documenting dying music. Kappers’ loving portrait retraces the song hunter’s steps, meeting up with some of the people recorded as far back as the 1930s. “All cultures need their fair share of the airtime. When country folk or tribal peoples hear or view their own traditions in the media something magical occurs. They see that their expressive style is as good as that of others.”-Alan Lomax. (94 mins.)

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WHEN STUMPTOWN WAS JUMPTOWN
DIRECTOR: SAMUEL ALLEN
US 2005

FEB 4 SAT 2 PM Whitsell Auditorium

The influx of African-American shipyard workers during World War II created a hungry audience for jazz and blues in Portland. That, in turn, led to a thriving club scene, regular appearances by all the musical luminaries of the era and the emergence of top-flight local musicians who called Williams Avenue their home. Inspired by Portland historian Bob Dietsche’s newly published “Jumptown: The Golden Years of Portland Jazz, 1942-1957,” Adams uses stories told to him by Portland jazz artists “Sweet Baby James” Benton, Ray Horn and Mel Brown, as well as author Dietsche, as he takes us to the locales around what is now the Rose Garden district on a search for the musical ghosts of the past and the celebration of a glorious era when Portland was a 24/7 jazz oasis. (60mins.)
DIRECTOR SAMUEL ALLEN AND AUTHOR BOB DEITSCHE, WHO WILL SIGN BOOKS, WILL BE ON HAND TO TALK ABOUT PORTLAND JAZZ HISTORY.

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COLTRANE LEGACY
DIRECTOR: BURRILL CROHN
US 1985

FEB 4 SAT 4:30 PM Whitsell Auditorium
FEB 5 SUN 8:30 PM Guild Theatre


During a 12-year span, from joining Miles Davis’ band in 1955 until his early death in 1967, saxophonist John Coltrane revolutionized modern jazz. Crohn’s essential COLTRANE LEGACY profiles his stunning career via interviews and television clips, capturing virtually all of the existing television performances between 1959 and 1964 with Davis, Eric Dolphy, McCoy Tyner, Reggie Workman, Elvin Jones and Jimmy Cobb. Highlighting this year’s Portland Jazz Festival, February 17-19, is “Chasin’ the Trane—Remembering John Coltrane,” a series of events, including performances (McCoy Tyner and Ravi Coltrane) and related educational programs, honoring John Coltrane as one of the most influential figures in 21st Century music. After seeing this film you’ll enjoy it all the more. (60 mins.)
FOR A COMPLETE FESTIVAL SCHEDULE GO TO WWW.PDXJAZZ.COM.

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MY NAME IS ALBERT AYLER
DIRECTOR: KASPER COLLIN
SWEDEN 2005

FEB 4 SAT 7 PM Whitsell Auditorium
FEB 5 SUN 7 PM Guild Theatre

John Coltrane called saxophonist Albert Ayler the most important innovator in jazz. One of the leading figures in the avant-garde of the 1960s, his radical music left most perplexed and Ayler frustrated by the lack of acceptance for his music. Born in Cleveland, Ayler recorded his first album in Sweden in 1962, but only eight years later, at age 34, was found dead in New York’s East River, a mystery still unsolved. Collin’s film is filled with rich and rare archival material along with intimate recollections with family, friends and colleagues. “One of the most starkly beautiful and moving documentaries ever made about a jazz musician.”-Thomas Conrad, JAZZ TIMES. (79 mins.)
www.mynameisalbertayler.com

 

WITH
DAVE HOLLAND
DIRECTOR: ULLI GRUBER
US 2004


One night in 1968, Miles Davis walked into a London club where 20-year old bassist Dave Holland was playing with Joe Henderson. Davis immediately bought him a ticket to New York to join his band, the start of career that has placed Holland at the pinnacle of acoustic bass players, whether as a soloist, or at the helm of his various quintets and big bands. Gruber captures the ups and downs of a remarkable talent, whose most recent accolades include winning Downbeat Magazine’s 2005 Critics Poll for Musician of the Year, Big Band of the Year and Acoustic Bassist of the Year. (23 mins.)

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THE DEVIL AND DANIEL JOHNSTON
DIRECTOR: JEFF FEUERZEIG
US 2005

FEB 12 SUN 8 PM Guild Theatre

Winner of the Director Award for Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival, Feuerzeig captures the soul of a troubled artist. According to Kurt Cobain, Daniel Johnston was the greatest songwriter on earth. Musician, cult outsider artist and manic-depressive, Daniel Johnston’s wild behavioral fluctuations, downward-spirals and delusions of grandeur have ensured that he remains an enigma to the music industry, but to others he is simply an unrewarded genius. As a reclusive teenager, Johnston showed signs of unusual artistic ability, creating intuitive super-8 films and expressive comic-book-style drawings in the basement of his family home. After falling out with his fundamentalist Christian family, he literally ran off to join a carnival, before landing in Austin, Texas, broke and alone. It was here that he began to hone his musical career and primitive, poetic songs. But just as he was making a name for himself locally, Johnston’s inner demons began to take hold. Featuring interviews with Johnston and those closest to him—as well as amazing concert and home super-8 footage—Feuerzig’s film is a haunting portrait of an unusual talent. (94 mins.)

 

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