Showing This Week
Reel Music Festival
Jewish Film Festival
Special Screenings
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Welcome to the Northwest Film Center's 22nd edition of Reel Music. We've kept our eyes peeled over the last year for new works, plus a few reprises, for our annual celebration of music and film. Whatever your musical tastes, we hope that there is something in this year's eclectic lineup to warm your soul and get your new year off on inspirational note. Special thanks go to The Oregonian, Music Millennium and Starbucks for helping make it all happen. Enjoy!
 

MILES ELECTRIC: A DIFFERENT KIND OF BLUE
US 2004 DIRECTOR: MURRAY LERNER

01.07.05 Friday 7 PM—
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
01.08.05 Saturday 7 & 9 PM—
GUILD THEATRE

When Miles Davis released ‘Bitches Brew” in 1970, the reaction was much like that of Dylan purists who recoiled at his going electric in 1965. Davis’ new direction, coming on the heels of his pioneering “In A Silent Way,” brought to full flower the influences of street funk, Jimi Hendrix, John McLaughlin and others experimenting in the intersection of jazz, blues, rock. Davis’s performance at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in front of 600,000 rock fans marked a key moment in his musical transition and provides the core of Lerner’s film, around which is interspersed contemporary reminiscences by musicians who were at Davis’ side —Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock, Keith Jarrett, Dave Holland, Gary Bartz— as well as Carlos Santana, Joni Mitchell and others profoundly affected by his innovations.
(87 mins.)

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BE HERE TO LOVE ME: A FILM ABOUT TOWNES VAN ZANDT
US 2004 DIRECTOR: MARGARET BROWN

01.07.05 Friday 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
“Steve Earle offered to ‘stand on Bob Dylan's coffee table in my cowboy boots’ to declare him the world's greatest songwriter. In concert, Lucinda Williams often dedicates ‘2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten’ to him. His songs have been recorded by artists as diverse as Emmylou Harris, Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard and The Meat Puppets. In other words, the late Townes Van Zandt (1945–1997) was a songwriter's songwriter, the kind of artist who is always more famous dead than alive. That Townes is so achingly present in this tender documentary portrait owes much to Austin-based filmmaker Margaret Brown's feel for his art and œuvre, expressed with an elegant assembly of lively archival footage and heartfelt interviews. Fans of Van Zandt's music will be pleased to find that the songs are at home here, impressively haunting this evocative biography. For those of us slackers new to the music and to the man, they are a revelation: sad and beautiful and perfect.”—TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL. (99 mins.)

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HANK WILLIAMS: HONKY TONK BLUES
US 2004 DIRECTOR: MORGAN NEVILLE

JAN 9 SUN 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
Hank Williams, the architect of country music, was a superstar at 25 and a dead icon at 29. Neville’s (MUDDY WATERS: CAN’T BE SATISFIED) engrossing portrait, narrated by Hank Williams III, sheds light on this mercurial singer-songwriter whose tender musings on love and ruin didn’t just embody the honky tonk ethos, but practically invented it. Loaded with spectacular archival footage and interviews with fellow Drifting Cowboys, family and friends, HONKY TONK BLUES provides an engrossing portrait of a life lived hard and a music that endures like no other. (90 mins.)

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DAVID HOCKNEY: THE COLORS OF MUSIC
FRANCE 2003 DIRECTOR: MARYTE KAVALIAUSKAS, SETH SCHNEIDERMAN

JAN 9 SUN 7 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
David Hockney has long been one of the more celebrated artists of his generation. Among his many passions has been a love of music and opera, which has led him to design stage sets for 11 operas. Through his imaginative use of lighting and color, Hockney has transformed opera into an experience audiences enjoy watching as well as hearing, the sad irony being that over the last decade he has slowly become deaf from a genetic condition that has curtailed his prized collaborations. THE COLORS OF MUSIC provides a rare, insightful look at the artistic process and one man's deep passion for linking sound and image. (85 mins.)

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FALLEN ANGEL: GRAM PARSONS
GERMANY/BRITAIN 2004 DIRECTOR: GANDULF HENNIG

JAN 11 TUE 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE—visiting artist
Hennig’s meticulously researched film traces the former Byrd, Flying Burrito Brother and solo artist’s life (1946–1973) from his privileged upbringing to the still-bizarre, controversial (to some) circumstances of his death from an overdose of morphine and tequila in the Joshua Tree Desert. Generally considered to be the pioneer of the country-rock genre, his groundbreaking style influenced everyone from the Eagles to the Rolling Stones to Wilco. Interviewees include family and numerous former bandmates including Chris Hillman and “Sneaky” Pete Kleinow, plus Keith Richards, Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris and notorious “Road Mangler” Phil Kaufman. Highlighted by great music rare footage and frankly told tales, FALLEN ANGEL is a bittersweet tribute to one of rock and country’s most influential musicians. (88 mins.) Gandulf Hennig will introduce the film.

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JANDEK ON CORWOOD
US 2004 DIRECTOR: CHAD FRIEDRICHS

JAN 13 14 THUR 7 PM, FRI 9 PM
GUILD THEATRE
The musician known only as Jandek has played live only ßonce, has only given one interview in 25 years—over the phone—and is the only artist on the Corwood Industries label, identified only by a Houston PO Box. Yet Jandek has released 35 albums and can count among his cult followers Kurt Cobain, Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore and Beck. His music is agonized, confessional and difficult to listen to—a cacophonous mix of rock and suicide-note blues with untuned acoustic guitar, cracked voice and occasionally a distant piano or skeletal percussion. Proclaimed one of “the ten most interesting musicians of the 1980s” by SPIN magazine, Friedrich’s assembles the scant evidence, rounds up celebrity fans and combines it all with haunting imagery to investigate the fanciful theories that swirl around one of music’s most enigmatic phenomenon. (89 mins.)

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THE NOMI SONG
GERMANY 2004 DIRECTOR: ANDREW HORN

JAN 14 FRI 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
Klaus Nomi, a cult figure in the New York underground club scene, was one of the early ‘80s most profoundly bizarre, yet extremely talented performance artists-musicians. With his stunning stage performances of such hits as Saint-Saën's “Samson and Delilah,” Donna Summer's “I Feel Love” and Chubby Checker's “The Twist,” Nomi became an icon in the downtown art scene beginning in the late '70s and an influence to musiciansas diverse as Morrissey and David Bowie. Horn’s film chronicles Nomi's life and early death from AIDS, incorporating footage from live performances as well as interviews with relatives, friends and colleagues to uncover the mysteries of a man whose fame, influence and visual style so captivated a generation. (96 mins.)

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BETTY BLOWTORCH (AND HER AMAZING TRUE LIFE ADVENTURES)
US 2003 DIRECTOR: ANTHONY SCARPA

JAN 14 15 FRI 8:45 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SAT 9 PM
GUILD THEATRE

For two years, director Anthony Scarpa followed the all-girl rock band Betty Blowtorch, documenting the band’s ferocious sound and dangerously low-tech pyrotechnic show, unaware of the turmoil and tragedy that he would ultimately capture. Betty Blowtorch quickly rose through the Los Angeles music scene, winning the LA WEEKLY’S award for Best Punk/Hardcore Band in 1999 and gaining a rabid fan base across the country. Scarpa captures their amazing story without ever letting you forget just how much the band rocked. "Meet the girls your parents warned you about dating. . .or turning into."—ALTERNATIVE PRESS. (98 mins.)

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WHOSE IS THIS SONG?
BULGARIA 2003 DIRECTOR: ADELA PEEVA

JAN 14 FRI 7 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
"In a nice little restaurant in Istanbul, we were having dinner with friends from various Balkan countries—a Greek, a Macedonian, a Turk, a Serb, and me, a Bulgarian. There I heard the song whose story is told in the film. As soon as we heard the song, we all started humming it, each of us in his own language. Everyone claimed that the song came from his own country. Then we started a fierce fight—whose song is it? I knew from my childhood that the song was Bulgarian. I wanted to find out why the others also claimed the song as their own."—AP. Full of irony and barbed humor, WHOSE IS THIS SONG? is a comic road movie across Greece, Turkey and the Balkans that offers a microcosm of the area's infamous ethnic and national rivalries through the story of a song in different guises—from love ballad to religious hymn to rousing march—that each, with cultural fervor, claims as their very own. (71 mins.)

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LAST OF THE FIRST
US 2004 DIRECTOR: ANJA BARON

JAN 15 16 SAT 7 PM, SUN 4:30 PM
GUILD THEATRE
In 1973 Al Volmer put together the Harlem Blues and Jazz Band to provide performance opportunities for legendary musicians of the Swing era. They have been playing ever since. Anja Baron’s infectious and touching tribute captures the joy and spirit that this cadre of 70-90 year-old greats bring to themselves and audiences worldwide. Among the legends: Al Casey (87), Fats Waller’s and Art Tatum’s guitarist; Lawrence Lucie (95), guitarist with Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong; Johnny Blowers (91), drummer for Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra; Ivan Rolle (85), string bassist with Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday; Laurel Watson (88), vocalist with Duke Ellington and Count Basie; and many more. The film follows band members from regular Harlem club gigs to Russian tour on which, in the sunset of their years, they remain heroes. (88 mins.)

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TRIBUTE TO ELMER BERNSTEIN:
MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM

US 1955 DIRECTOR: OTTO PREMINGER

JAN 16 SUN 6:30 pm GUILD THEATRE
“Drug-addicted poker dealer (Frank Sinatra) struggling to kick the 'monkey on his back' and to live on good terms with his crippled wife (Eleanor Parker) and the general assortment of drunks, cardsharps, and dope peddlers that inhabit his world. Excellently played (particularly by Sinatra) and with some finely realized backgrounds of the Chicago slums, although the things that stay in the memory long after the rest of the film has been forgotten are Elmer Bernstein's strident jazz score (played by Shorty Rogers) and the ingenious credit titles of Saul Bass who designed the titles for a number of Preminger's films. . ..”—Roy Pritchard. (119 mins.)

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TRIBUTE TO ELMER BERNSTEIN:
SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS

US 1957 DIRECTOR: ALEXANDER MACKENDRICK

JAN 21 FRI 7 PM GUILD THEATRE
J.J. Hunsecker (Burt Lancaster), a cynical, heartless New York gossip columnist (a loosely based composite of Walter Winchell and Ed Sullivan), will stop at nothing to prevent his younger sister Susan (Susan Harrison) from having a romance with jazz musician Steven Dallas (Martin Milner). He convinces blackmailing press agent Sidney Falco (Tony Curtis) to break up the duo, which proves to be more difficult than he anticipated. “By turns shrill and tragic, the film pulsates with Bernstein's discordant, jazzy score, which sends shrieking trumpets up dead-end alleys after characters and throbs deep bass ostinatos under scenes of agonized internal conflict. Even when Chico Hamilton's experimental jazz quartet takes a confident, thoughtful turn in the Elysian Room, it plays against the tense background of Sidney's Byzantine cloakroom intriguing.”—Kevin Jack Hagopian. (96 mins.)

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WITH
POWERS OF TEN
US 1968 DIRECTOR: CHARLES AND RAY EAMES

A trip into deep space and back—into the universe of the human body. (9 mins.)

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COLUMBIA PICTURES RESTORATIONS
ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK

US 1956 DIRECTOR: FRED F. SEARS

JAN 22 SAT 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
This year marks the 50th anniversary of Bill Haley’s rock and roll classic, which when it was featured in THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE (1955), ignited the teen rock and roll movie genre. Producer Sam Katzman’s quick capitalization on Haley’s popularity was the first time a rock star was at the center of a film. When a record promoter (Johnny Johnston) happens upon Haley and his band in rural Pennsylvania, he whisks them to New York and turns them into rock and roll stars. The thin plot allegorizes the meteoric rise of rock and roll from a down-home hybrid of blues and country music into a national phenomenon, but never gets in the way of invigorating performances by rock and roll pioneers such as Haley and His Comets and the Platters, among others (77 mins.)

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WITH
DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK
US 1956 DIRECTOR: FRED F. SEARS

Aimed squarely at the generation gap between rock-and-roll-loving teenagers and their parents, the follow-up to ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK probably didn’t convert many elders . When rock and roll star Arnie Haines (Alan Dale) returns to his hometown, he finds that his folks don't much care for the new sounds on the radio. With the help of the local teens and other musicians he tries to win them over by drawing the connections between rock and roll and 1920s jazz. It's a tough sell, but Little Richard belting out "Tutti Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally" is evidence enough to persuade anyone that rock and roll's was there to stay. (84 mins.)

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HITLER’S HIT PARADE
GERMANY 2003 DIRECTOR: OLIVER AXER, SUSANNE BENZE

JAN 22 23 SAT 7:30 PM—
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
SUN 2 PM—
GUILD THEATRE
When the Nazis came to power in the 1920s and1930s, Germany was one of the world’s most sophisticated, highly educated cultures, home to many of the world's pre-eminent artists, writers, composers, scientists and thinkers. How was it that this advanced society could unleash one of civilization’s greatest tragedies? HITLER'S HIT PARADE uses a collage of music and archival footage—from feature films, home movies, educational and propaganda films and commercials—to reveal the false idealism that characterized the Nazis' rise to power. Forgoing didactic narration, Axer and Benze’s sound and image track of the popular music culture of the era provides a meditation on the emotional undercurrent in a nation blithely preparing to destroy much of the world. (76 mins.)

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BRUCE HAACK: THE KING OF TECHNO
US 2003 DIRECTOR: PHILIP ANAGNOS

JAN 23 SUN 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
A musical visionary whose imaginative songwriting and arranging was only matched by his electronic wizardry, Bruce Haack (who died in 1988) left a legacy of almost unparalleled creative output. The 1950s and 1960s saw him producing imaginative children’s albums (DANCE, SING, & LISTEN), penning pop songs, and appearing on TV shows (even Mr. Rogers) to showcase homemade devices such as the Dermatron, a heat-sensitive synthesizer that made music by skin-to-skin contact. In the 1970s and 1980s, Haack expanded into darker areas (THE ELECTRIC LUCIFER) and his singular contribution to hip-hop (PARTY MACHINE). BRUCE HAACK: THE KING OF TECHNO reveals that the world is still catching up to this prolific and distinctive pioneer. (60 mins.)

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WITH
MOOG
US 2004 DIRECTOR: HANS FJELLESTAD

Bob Moog changed the sound of modern music. The inventor of the Moog synthesizer, this engaging portrait of a mad-scientist provides a fascinating history of the impact of his epochal, eponymous instrument, first used in TV commercials and electronic music before the smash success of “Switched-On Bach” catapulted it into the heart of pop music. The eclectic mix of performers and testifiers includes Keith Emerson, Rick Wakeman, DJ Spooky, Money Mark, and Mix Master Mike and the soundtrack features new music created on Moog instruments by Stereolab, Meat Beat Manifesto, Tortoise, and others. (70 mins.)

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DESPERATE MAN BLUES
AUSTRALIA 2003 DIRECTOR: EDWARD GILLAN

JAN 27 THUR 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
Obsessive record collector Joe Bussard parties like it's 1929! A cultural scavenger, he’s been collecting and preserving 78 rpm records—particularly blues, hillbilly and folk music from the ’20s and ’30s—for more than 50 years. Now in his mid-60s he has rescued more than 25,000 shellac artifacts from attics and basements across the US and he’ll happily spin them all day long with a running commentary on the music and perhaps the story of the find. With a soggy cigar perpetually clamped between his teeth, straddling his custom-built turntable in his basement in his home in Virginia and surrounded by his treasure trove, this is one man who truly waxes ecstatic. (83 mins.)

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FOLLOWED BY
LOSER’S CLUB
US 2003 DIRECTOR: PIERRE OUElLETTE

Born and bred in the age of hot rods and surf music, Portland guitarists and bandleaders Jim Mesi and Steve Bradley became local legends in the ‘70s Portland music scene. Mesi, who toured with BB King, cemented his position as a world-class blues guitar player while Bradley became an anchor in the local club scene with his quirky songwriting and inventive rock and roll bands. Over the years, both artists have honed their musical visions to polished perfection—playing on virtually every stage in Portland. Ouellette, a guitarist himself, affectionately explores the lives of these journeymen performers as they rock-on across the tides of pop music trends, the siren calls of fame and fortune, and audiences that inevitably change, but always love them. (60 mins.)

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BIG CITY DICK
US 2003 DIRECTORS: SCOTT MILAM, KEN HARDER, TODD POTTINGER

JAN 28 FRI 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
An engaging portrait of Richard (Big City Dick) Peterson, an autistic street performer in Seattle. A musical savant who plays trumpet and piano, Peterson grew up obsessed by ‘50s television music (particularly “Sea Hunt”) and various pop-culture fixations including Johnny Mathis, who he has managed to befriend in the course of traveling the country to see him. An endearing celebrity stalker whose friends range from local radio and TV personalities to Mathis and soul-mate , actor Jeff Bridges, Peterson has managed to produce four albums that quirkily incorporate his 50 years of memorized musical themes, as well as improbably play with Seattle’s The Young Fresh Fellows. “[This] rollicking, breathless documentary . . . an oddly touching tribute to a vanishing vaudevillian spirit . . ..”—VARIETY. (120 mins.)

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ARVO PÄRT: 24 PRELUDES FOR A FUGUE
ESTONIA 2002 DIRECTOR: DORIAN SUPIN

JAN 29 SAT 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
Estonian Arvo Pärt is one of the most popular and distinctive composers working today, his work finding new audiences through use in numerous films, including Tom Tykwer’s HEAVEN and Gus Van Sant’s GERRY. Supin captures the composer in short segments, as if trying to trace the source of his genius. Pärt copies out a score, recalls his childhood, argues with his wife about whether tomatoes are sweet or savory, comments on his trademark simple style, dubbed tintinnabuli, and on his turning-point composition, “Für Alina.” Pärt quotes a street sweeper he once met: “a composer should love every sound,” and says “When they announce the time on the radio, it sometimes sounds like one’s whole life is behind it.” Pärt spent 13 years in exile before returning to Estonia in 1993, where he accepts the gift of his supreme talent with a touching sense of wonder, responsibility, joy and melancholy. (87 mins.)

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TRIBUTE TO ELMER BERNSTEIN:
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN

US 1960 DIRECTOR: JOHN STURGES

JAN 30 SUN 7 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
In this remake of Akira Kurosawa ’s THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, seven gunfighters are recruited from the United States to defend a small Mexican village from bandits who terrorize the inhabitants each year. They teach the locals how to defend themselves, but when the lead bandit arrives he must survive the ultimate face-off against some equally bad hombres—Yul Brenner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Horst Bucholtz and Eli Wallach. Bernstein’s score remains one of the most memorable Western themes and Charles Lang’s great cinematography captures the stirring action scenes with flair. (128 mins.)

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SANTO DOMINGO BLUES
US 2003 DIRECTOR: ALEX WOLF

JAN 30 SUN 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
SANTO DOMINGO BLUES
tells the story of Luis Vargas and Bachata, the guitar blues of the Dominican Republic. Born in the bars and brothels of the poor, Bachata was infamous as the anthem of the hard-drinking, womanizing, down-on-his-luck everyman. Once looked down upon by the high culture, it is now eclipsing rap as the music of choice for Latino youth across the US. Thanks to Vargas and his contemporaries, who came to New York and popularized it among Dominican immigrants, the once scorned music has been transformed into an emblem of national pride. With performances by Luis Vargas, Raulín Rodríguez, Luis Segura, Eladio Romero Santos, Aridia Ventura, Ramón Cordero, Teodoro Reyes and Joan Soriano. (74 mins.)

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QUEEN OF THE GYPSIES: A PORTRAIT OF CARMEN AMAYA
US 2003 DIRECTOR: JOCELYN AJAMI

FEB 3 THUR 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
Carmen Amaya (1913–1968) transformed the art of Flamenco dance. From humble beginnings in a Barcelona gypsy slum, by her early teens, patrons were throwing plates and shattering china in appreciation after the great guitarist "Sabicas" (Augustin Castellon) introduced her at the Villa Rosa. By 1941, already a film star, she had begun touring the US where Carnegie Hall patrons threw mink alongside the roses. She moved to Hollywood where, despite being limited to stereotypical roles, she became the first Roma to gain international stardom. Weaving electrifying performance footage and music, along with interviews with scholars, family members, fellow artists and friends, Ajami celebrates the life of an astonishing legend. (81 mins.)

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WHY VIVALDI?
USA 2003 DIRECTOR: TEDDY GROUYA

FEB 3 THUR 7 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
Over the past decade there has been a surge in interest in Antonio Vivaldi's music; he has been outselling all the other classical composers. Grouya visits with scholars and devotees from different countries, backgrounds and tastes—all of whom are uniquely drawn to the great Italian Baroque composers masterworks. Along the way the journey leads to Venice and the rooms where Vivaldi, known as “The Red Priest,” lived and wrote his music. In Florence, as a Baroque ensemble plays Vivaldi's music on instruments from the time, the reasons for his enduring popularity are not hard to hear. (70 mins.) TEDDY GROUYA in attendance.

WITH
THE MAN WITH AN OPERA HOUSE IN HIS LIVING ROOM
UK 2003 DIRECTOR: MIRA ERDEVICKI

Erdevicki’s wry film documents one man's unusual fortitude in realizing his idiosyncratic dream in the middle of the serene (sometimes stodgy) English countryside. Former professional opera singer Richard White (a true eccentric) fights bravely against stifling parking regulations, the ill will of his neighbors, budgetary limitations and more in his determination to mount a fully-staged performance of a Mozart opera (literally) in his own living room. The quiet village of Claxton in Norfolk soon gains a reputation that attracts classical music enthusiasts from far and wide, something the entrenched, peace-loving inhabitants don't like at all. (60 mins.)

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DIFFERENT DRUMMER: ELVIN JONES
US 1979 DIRECTOR: ED GRAY

FEB 4  FRI 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE-visiting artist
Last spring saw the passing of jazz giant Elvin Jones, who powered one of the most extraordinary ensembles in jazz history, the John Coltrane Quartet. In Gray's film Jones demonstrates the fierce polyrhythmic approach of his impressionistic playing, touching musical philosophy and his evolution to what many considered him to be-the greatest drummer of his era. In addition to performance footage of his band at the time are clips from the Coltrane era, of which he says, "We didn't have to talk much. It was telepathy."  (30 mins.)

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WITH
STRANGER: BERNIE WORRELL ON EARTH
US 2004 DIRECTOR: PHIL DI FIORE

Since writing a piano concerto at age eight, Bernie Worrell has been acknowledged as a musical genius. He joined the Washington Symphony Orchestra at 10 and attended the Boston Conservatory of Music. Then, amazingly, he joined Geroge Clinton and Bootsie Collins in Parliament/Funkadelic, where, with his arranging skills, innovation with keyboards and synthesizers and monster chops, literally changed music forever. Through his work with Parliament, Talking Heads, Keith Richards, Warren Hynes (Govt Mule) and Mos Def, Worrell almost single-handedly shaped the electronic sound of the last four decades and has become one of the most sampled musicians in hip-hop. Yet at age 60, Worrell is struggling and anonymous. Phil Di Fiore captures the life and sound of an overlooked musical mastermind who deserves his place in the pantheon. "Bernie will be historically significant in the way that Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf were." -Warren Hayes. (40 mins.)  Director Phil Di Fiore will introduce the film.

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MUSIC FROM THE INSIDE OUT
DIRECTOR: DANIEL ANKER

FEB 5 6 SAT 7 PM, SUN 5 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
MUSIC FROM THE INSIDE OUT is a unique exploration of the magic and mystery of the musical experience, told through the stories and music of some of the 105 musicians of one of the world's finest symphony orchestras, The Philadelphia Orchestra. The Orchestra's first film project since 1940 when they rose to prominence after being featured in Disney's FANTASIA, it is a unique collaboration between Anker and the musicians themselves which started five years ago with a series of filmed workshops in which the musicians gathered to ponder the unanswerable in music. Does our musical personality reflect who we are? How do musicians find self-expression as part of an ensemble? Is it possible to put into words the intangibility of the musical experience? Intimately delving into the lives of the eclectically gifted musicians outside, as well as inside the concert hall, it reveals that for all, music is more than a job. Whether their passions lie with bluegrass, salsa, jazz, Middle Eastern music, or string quartet and symphonies, music offers solace, comfort, and a sense of belonging to those who follow its beat. (90 mins.)

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BODYSONG
UK 2002 DIRECTOR: SIMON PUMMELL

FEB 5 6 SAT 7 PM, SUN 5 PM
GUILD THEATRE
BODYSONG
is an epic story of love, sex, violence, death and dreams told entirely through archival footage from around the world and across 100 years of cinema history. A kaleidoscopic lifecycle journey experienced through striking imagery from a wide variety of silent films, newsreels, documentaries, and home movies, Pummell’s KOYAANISQUATSI-like meditation is accompanied by a hypnotic, electro-futuristic musical score by Radiohead's multi-instrumentalist wonder Jonny Greenwood. The result is a truly unique experience in music and moving image that explores the universal in human experience. (83 mins.)

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TEXAS TENOR: THE ILLINOIS JACQUET STORY
US 1991 DIRECTOR: ARTHUR ELGORT

FEB 6 SUN 7 PM
GUILD THEATRE
Jean Baptiste "Illinois" Jacquet died last July at the age of 81, leaving a fiery, bluesy musical legacy begun at age 19 in the Lionel Hampton Band with his famous solo on “Flying Home.” Noted fashion photographer Arthur Elgort's stylish documentary captures both the blazing swing player and the sensitive, master balladeer, who as sideman, bandleader, entertainer and teacher was the undisputed “King of the Texas Tenors” and one of the most influential bridges between the big band and rhythm and blues eras. Featuring interviews with Lionel Hampton, Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins and Les Paul among many others. (81 mins.)

WITH
MUSIC FOR ONE APARTMENT AND SIX DRUMMERS
SWEDEN 2001 DIRECTOR: OLA SIMONSSON, JOHANNES NILSSON
(10 mins.)

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CABALLÉ: BEYOND THE MUSIC
SPAIN 2003 DIRECTOR: ANTONIO FARRE

FEB 6 SUN 7 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
“Music is like vitamins which the blood distributes throughout the entire body.” So exclaims Montserrat Caballé in this engaging excursion through the life of Spain's greatest soprano. Featuring stunning concert footage and interviews with her peers, including Zubin Mehta, Mstislav Rostropovich, Placido Domingo, Joan Sutherland, Claudio Abbado, Renée Fleming, and Marilyn Horne, Farré traces her rise from humble beginnings in Barcelona, through her early years as a professional in Basel and Bremen, her career-defining 1965 Carnegie Hall performance in Donizetti's “Lucrezia Borgia,” to her rise as an international star of the first magnitude. Surveying her many historic performances and recordings, a personal as well as professional portrait emerges—of Montserrat, the person and Caballé, the diva. (98 mins.)

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PEPPER’S POW-WOW
US 1996 DIRECTOR: SANDRA OSAWA

FEB 12 SAT 5 PM
@ THE 5TH AVENUE CINEMA—visiting artist
For those who heard Portland tenor saxophonist Jim Pepper (1941–1992), he was an unforgettable jazz player. Of Kaw-Creek ancestry, Pepper was one of the innovators of jazz-rock fusion, a gifted composer who successfully melded Native American music with jazz, and an awesomely talented musician, equally at home with a ballad or playing burning, straight-ahead bebop. Seattle filmmaker Sandra Osawa’s fitting tribute traces Pepper’s life and musical association with such famed collaborators as Ornette Coleman, Don Cherry, Bob Moses, Larry Coryell and Charlie Haden, the impact of his songs such as “Wichi Tai To” and “Comin’ and Goin’,” and an astonishingly rich and diverse array of performances and recordings. (60 mins.) SANDRA OSAWA in attendance.
This screening is at the 5th Avenue Cinemas, 510 SW Hall and cosponsored by the Portland State University Film Committee. Presented in association with the Portland Jazz Festival, February 11–20, the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission, and the Leroy Vinnegar Jazz Institute—collaborators on a series of events celebrating Pepper’s legacy. For a full schedule of events go to www.pdxjazz.com and ochc.org.

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TOUCH THE SOUND
GERMANY/NETHERLANDS 2004 DIRECTOR: THOMAS RIEDELSHEIMER

FEB 13 SUN 1 PM
WHITSELL AUDITORIUM
Riedelsheimer, who brilliantly documented Andy Goldsworthy's ephemeral art in RIVERS AND TIDES, has made another captivating portrait. Almost totally deaf due to a neurological disorder, Scottish percussionist Evelyn Glennie has a rare ability to use her whole body to capture sounds and transform them into stunning music. Glennie performs in cities from New York to Kyoto with a variety of classical, found and experimental instruments, from which she is able to coax a startling variety of sounds. She entrances onlookers in Grand Central Station with her beloved snare drum, while in Japan she taps out a rhythm on detritus she finds in a café, while in an abandoned warehouse, she performs magical duets with guitarist Fred Frith. Filmed over the course of a year, TOUCH THE SOUND is a poetic exploration of the primal relationships between body, rhythm, and sound—a lesson in listening and allowing our senses to really sense. (99 mins.)

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Northwest FilmCenter | About us
Mailing Address: 1219 SW Park Avenue, Portland, OR 97205 | Street Address: 1139 SW 11th Ave. Portland, OR 97205
Phone: (503) 221-1156 | Fax: (503) 294-0874 | info@nwfilm.org